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General Lee Will Cease Production; Three States Plan To End Specialty Plates

Whether its emblazoned on bumper stickers, license plates or vehicles themselves, the Confederate flag has been a fixture of the automotive landscape for as long as cars have been on the road. This week, that's changing.


Supreme Court Rules On Free-Speech Case Involving Motorists

States have the right to reject controversial specialty license plates, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday.


Delays Could Infringe Upon Motorists' Fourth Amendment Rights

Police officers cannot detain motorists for any longer than necessary during ordinary traffic stops.


Supreme Court Examines Free-Speech Case That Could Open Vehicular Floodgates

Texas won't let a group of Confederate supporters have a specialty license plate. An upcoming decision from the Supreme Court in that case could have unforeseen implications.


A New Hampshire man who was denied the vanity license plate COPSLIE because it was insulting to police is having his case taken to the state's Supreme Court. The man, who changed his name from David Montenegro to "human," argues that the plate doesn't violate any of the New Hampshire DMV's regulations.


The Third Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a pervious Supreme Court ruling stating federal authorities must seek out a warrant before equipping suspects' vehicles with GPS monitoring devices.


The Supreme Court will be offering up its thoughts on emissions, as the highest court in the land will hear a challenge to greenhouse gas regulations that were instituted by the Environmental Protection Agency in 2007. The New York Times refers to the case being heard by SCOTUS as "a sequel" to an earlier case, which mandated that the EPA would regulate greenhouse gases emitted by new cars and trucks, if it were proven those emissions posed a danger to public health.


Toyota is surely readying its trial lawyers, as the Japanese giant is officially headed to court in a pair of cases relating to its unintended acceleration fiascos of 2009 and 2010.


Refusal to hear case paves the way for expanded use of the ethanol blend

The U.S. Supreme Court will not hear a case that attempted to thwart the sale of fuel containing a higher percentage of ethanol, a decision that could clear the way for the more widespread use of E15.


The US Supreme Court has effectively rejected an effort to block sales of gasoline blended with 15-percent ethanol content (E15), refusing to hear a lawsuit and leaving in place an earlier ruling by a federal appeals court that confirms the fuel is legal to sell.


Big Oil's flagship trade association – the American Petroleum Institute – and eight other industry groups have filed with the US Supreme Court to stop higher blends of ethanol (specifically, 15 percent, or E15) from entering the US gasoline supply. They're asking the Supreme Court to overturn a federal appeals court's ruling that they lack standing to legally challenge the US Environmental Protection Agency's waivers that gasoline with 15 percent ethanol can be sold in the US.


Jonathon Friedman had his day in a San Francisco court, then Jurist Frank Drago had his say, declaring Friedman guilty. The case centered on a sheaf of corporation papers that Friedman used to make a statement about corporate 'personhood.' Driving in a carpool lane in the Bay Area, Friedman was pulled over for not having at least two people in the car. His response was to show the officer his business papers and, citing US Supreme Court decisions that have affirmed that corporations are people,


A driver in San Rafael, California is attempting to appeal a traffic citation for driving alone in a High Occupancy Vehicle lane. Jonathan Frieman and his attorney, Ford Greene, argue that since Frieman had corporate incorporation papers in his car when he was stopped by an officer, he was actually carpooling at the time. Technically, the state of California's definition of personhood includes both "natural persons and corporations." But Frieman's out to do more than just skirt a $478 traffic ti


The conservative movement in the U.S. has taken a decidedly negative approach to the Affordable Care Act (or ObamaCare, as some call it). What we didn't know was that the law is like having to buy a Chevrolet Volt.


Almost a year to the day after the second-generation Kia Sephia was hit with a $40 million jury award in a faulty seatbelt case, the inexpensive Korean is on the wrong side of another court verdict. This time it has to do with the brakes on the 1997-2000 Sephias, which were accused of wearing out too quickly. An owner in Pennsylvania sued, led to a class-action case against Kia and a Pennsylvania court awarding each of the 9,400 plaintiffs $600 in reimbursement, with the judgment totaling some $


Law enforcement agencies are now required to obtain a warrant before attaching a GPS device to a vehicle. The Detroit News reports the Supreme Court unanimously ruled today that the Justice Department was wrong when it argued that its agents didn't need permission to track private citizens without their knowledge.


The Supreme Court has long maintained that police can not forcibly enter someone's home without a warrant on the suspicion of driving under the influence, but a federal appeals court recently upheld a case in which a Virginia officer did just that.


Getting a ticket can ruin even the best of days, but at least American motorists have the ability to fight moving violations in court. Challenging a ticket at least gives drivers a shot at avoiding or reducing fines and/or points charged to their records.


The Supreme Court is set to rule on whether or not law enforcement officers need a warrant in order to track a suspect's vehicle with a GPS device. The case centers around Antoine Jones, whose vehicle was bugged for a month without his consent or a go-ahead from the justice department. The police have argued that such tracking shouldn't require a warrant because the location of Jones' vehicle on public streets is public knowledge. Advocates arguing against that stance say that the comprehensive


New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg has fought long and hard to uphold a local law requiring all city cab companies to replace their gas-guzzling Ford Crown Victoria sedans with more efficient livery vehicles. A noble goal, no doubt, but the Supreme Court is having none of it.


New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg has fought long and hard to uphold a local law requiring all city cab companies to replace their gas-guzzling Ford Crown Victoria sedans with more efficient livery vehicles. A noble goal, no doubt, but the Supreme Court is having none of it.

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