154 Articles
1 / 8
NEXT
2

Daimler, BMW, and Audi are teaming up to submit a bid for Here, Nokia's mapping division. However, they are taking on some some very powerful tech companies, including Uber and possibly Apple.

1

TomTom is hoping to become a major player in licensing maps to automakers. The company thinks its latest tech could be a competitive solution for autonomous cars.

7

Project Overlord promises to bring tracking software specifically to your vehicle's wheels, whether they're on a passenger car, bicycle or practically anything else, with a new, patent-pending device and smartphone app. When the wheels are tampered with, the system starts tracking them, sounds a loud tone and alerts the police. The company begins an IndieGoGo campaign on January 21 to fund the product.

Add

GPS device used to locate cars when risky borrowers miss payments

A woman snatched off the streets was rescued with the help of a GPS tracking device that had been installed on the suspect's car by the dealer in case it needed to be repossessed, authorities said Thursday.

39

Apple's Find My iPhone app locates California woman

​A tech-savvy cop in California saved a missing car-crash victim's life yesterday with a little know-how and an iPhone.

5

For the most part, plug-in hybrids rely on the power stored in the battery until that charge is depleted. Unless the switch can be changed manually, it's only then that the cars fire up the internal combustion engine and begin using the fossil fuels on board. This is ideal, of course, when one's drive isn't long enough that the car needs to start sipping gasoline at all. On longer commutes, when it's certain that the route is longer than the car's all-electric range, this isn't necessarily the m

55

Speed cameras are something of a foreign curiosity for many drivers in the US. Sure, there is sporadic use of red light cameras here, but the cams to catch speeders are much more popular in Europe. However, Hyundai might have created a way to end that scourge for our foreign auto enthusiast compatriots. The Korean automaker recently showed off a system on the Genesis at its headquarters in Seoul that could detect and automatically slow down for the nefarious devices. It could make many speeding

157

Here's some advice that will help prevent you from becoming a victim

Go ahead. Enjoy your BBQ. But lock your car in a safe place, because Memorial Day is the second-worst day of the year for car theft.

30

Did you know that GPS doesn't work underwater? Neither did we. But apparently it's a big enough problem that the United Kingdom's Ministry of Defense is working on a futuristic solution that will allow more precise navigation by the Royal Navy's submarines and surface ships, while eventually trickling down to consumer-grade mobile devices. That all sounds great, but its abilities aren't anywhere near as cool as its name – the quantum compass.

3

Google Maps, especially its Street View function, has redefined the way we use maps. The tech giant just launched an update for its mobile app on Android and iOS with a variety of useful, new features.

44

Ford marketing head honcho Jim Farley made waves at CES this week by telling show attendees, "We know everyone who breaks the law, we know when you're doing it," according to a report by Business Insider. Farley continued by saying, "We have GPS in your car, so we know what you're doing. By the way, we don't supply that data to anyone."

9

Tracking the cruisers could improve safety and response times

Contract negotiations between the Boston Police union and the city has resulted in an interesting development: The pending use of GPS tracking devices on police vehicles.

47

In the face of rising auto insurance premiums, insurance companies have been responding with potentially cheaper, pay-as-you-drive plans that, for billing purposes, track when, how, how much and where drivers use their vehicles instead of basing rates on statistics and past trends, The Detroit News reports. The practice isn't yet mainstream, but the National Association of Insurance Commissioners predicts 20 percent of insurance plans will be pay-as-you-go in five years; right now they account f

219

Gary Bojczak used the jammer intending to hide his whereabouts from his employer

A New Jersey man trying to hide his whereabouts from his employer inadvertently interfered with operations at Newark Liberty International Airport.

Add

We recently reported that a growing number of cars are offering head-up display units from the factory, but Garmin has come up with an innovative device to add this helpful technology to just about any vehicle. For just $129.99, the Garmin HUD unit is small, portable and can display navigation commands on the windshield (or an attached reflector lens) so the driver doesn't have to look away from the road.

2

Tony Stark isn't the only one with a heads up display (HUD) in his helmet.

Add

For cyclists, the road can be a dangerous place, and it can become all the more dangerous when you have to look up directions to where you are going on your phone while pedaling away. That's why bike-tech startup Helios created Helios Bars, handlebars that turn your ride into a smart bike.

77

Your home, contacts and even garage door opener can stay programmed in a car after trading it in

Cars have gone from being simply modes of transportation to rolling personal electronic devices. You wouldn't resell your computer or smartphone with all of your personal information on it, shouldn't your vehicle get the same treatment?

3

Self-drive touring is one of the fastest-growing trends in travel, according to a recent article in the magazine published by the American Society of Travel Agents. A Portuguese company, ToGuide is ahead of the curve here, and is offering a way to tour European cities by renting small, two-seat all-electric Renault Twizy vehicles outfitted with an audio guide and GPS.

66

Apple Maps is the beautiful but flawed pile of poo that just keeps on steaming. Not long after it appeared in the company's latest operating system, people noticed that it had a habit of showing destinations in the wrong locations, like a museum located underwater, or refusing to show locations at all, like the town of Stratford-Upon-Avon and most of a few world metropolises. The CEO apologized once, was met with hilarious rejoinders, then apologized again and recommended other map solutions, an

1 / 8
NEXT