Beginning in the immediate aftermath of World War II, the Honda Motor Company sought to fill a desperate need for affordable and reliable 2-wheeled transportation. And within fifteen years Honda was well on its way to reinventing the global motorcycle industry and identity. Launched in the U.S. with 'you meet the nicest people on a Honda' messaging, the ad campaign neutralized the negative images of motorcycles and their riders. Honda followed its successful launch of motorcycles with motorcycle competition, and planted the seed for Honda passenger cars with a successful entry into Formula One. Honda's first car for sale in the U.S. was the 600, propelled - after a fashion - by a two-cylinder, 600cc aircooled powerplant powering the front wheels. That was followed by the launch of the Civic, and while Honda management couldn't have predicted the OPEC crisis that same year, a front-wheel drive compact with high quality and an affordable price was just what the U.S. market ordered.

Today, Honda offers an essentially complete lineup of competent sedans, practical crossovers and a still-unconventional pickup, its new Ridgeline. The least expensive Honda is a toss-up between a base Fit and its newish crossover, the HR-V. The redesigned Civic is wildly popular, and the Accord is invariably the best-selling sedan in the marketplace, but on the Honda showroom the CR-V - due for a redesign in 2017 - commands comparable sales. The fun-to-drive descriptive is affixed to performance variants of the new Civic hatch, while 'most expensive' would be found on a heavily optioned Pilot crossover or Odyssey minivan.


2018 Honda Odyssey
2018 Honda Odyssey
MSRP:
$29,990
Engine:
3.5L V-6
MPG:
19 City / 28 HWY
2017 Honda Civic
2017 Honda Civic
MSRP:
$19,150
Engine:
2.0L I-4
MPG:
28 City / 39 HWY
2017 Honda Odyssey
2017 Honda Odyssey
MSRP:
$29,850
Engine:
3.5L V-6
MPG:
19 City / 27 HWY
2017 Honda Fit
2017 Honda Fit
MSRP:
$16,090
Engine:
1.5L I-4
MPG:
29 City / 36 HWY
2017 Honda Ridgeline
2017 Honda Ridgeline
MSRP:
$29,475
Engine:
3.5L V-6
MPG:
19 City / 26 HWY
2017 Honda CR-V
2017 Honda CR-V
MSRP:
$24,045
Engine:
2.4L I-4
MPG:
26 City / 32 HWY
Which car companies are creating new jobs in America?

Taking a look at which automakers are creating jobs and how many

Who's hiring and how many jobs have been announced.
Clarion Builds 1991 Acura NSX Review | Restored to greatness

Meet your hero.

Who doesn't want a Honda with more torque?
Honda aims to put Torro Rosso into top three in F1 next year

Team boss Franz Tost counters with more realistic expectations.

"Our spirit, Honda's spirit, is going to come back and for next year our goal is to fight for the top three at the front of the grid."
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For Sale

2012 Honda Accord
$13,888 / 51,875 miles / CA
2015 Honda CR-V
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2016 Honda Civic
$21,495 / 21,491 miles / CA
Watch two Acura NSXs scorch the Nurburgring

Why test the cars now, when they've been on sale for a while now? Could a performance variant be on the way?
2017 Honda Accord Hybrid First Drive
We get our first drive of the 2017 Honda Accord Hybrid, and while this thing is decent, we wonder if the highly touted MPG numbers will be reachable.
Watch us put the 2017 Honda Ridgeline through its paces
Autoblog Consumer Editor Jeremy Korzeniewski puts the 2017 Honda Ridgeline to the test and finds that it's a great truck for certain buyers.
‚Äč2017 Honda Ridgeline First Drive
Autoblog reviews the 2017 Honda Ridgeline and finds that it's comfortable, efficient, and a solid choice for rational pickup truck buyers.
Honda and NHTSA report 11th death linked to Takata airbags

If you receive a recall notice, please make repairs a priority.

This latest fatality brings the human toll of Takata's faulty airbag inflators to at least 100 injuries and 11 deaths.
Takata airbag victim urges consumers to head to the dealership

Corey Burdick lost an eye after an airbag in his Honda exploded during a low speed collision.
Honda audit says Takata manipulated airbag inflator data

Honda models not affected by the recall are still safe.

Former IIHS president Brian O'Neil says Takata selectively edited reports to make them shorter, prettier, and more favorable.