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Featuring An Interview With Ford's Doug Scott

Competition in the heavy duty truck segment heats up as we get our first look at the 2017 Ford F-Series Super Duty lineup. Autoblog's Adam Morath reports on this edition of Autoblog Minute. With commentary from Autoblog's senior editor Greg Migliore and an interview with Doug Scott of Ford Motor Company.


The Obama administration has proposed tough new fuel economy standards to improve fuel efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide pollution from trucks and vans.


The Workhorse Shows Its New Polish

In excess of 475,000 heavy duty pickups were sold in the United States last year – the capable workhorses represented more than 25 percent of the year's full-size pickup volume. But unlike the passenger-car segment, where dozens of makes and models are constantly competing for supremacy, the heavy-duty segment consistently boils down to a four-way battle between the Ford F-250 Super Duty, Ram 2500 and the Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD/GMC Sierra 2500HD twins. And, while today's automobile sho


Lithium-ion battery maker EnerDel is trying to broaden its sales into the secondary-battery-storage market as a way to help give the struggling company a second life of its own.


The Ford F-Series Super Duty pickup truck is a pretty big deal. Not only is it physically large and imposing, it's also a huge seller for Ford and a vehicle that practically generates its own weight in gold profit. That being the case, it's no surprise that Ford is keen to make some noise about a new trim level for the 2013 Super Duty.


Numbers like maximum horsepower, torque and tow ratings are the heart and soul of the full-size heavy duty pickup truck segment. No shocker there. But how much reliance can consumers actually put on figures provided by the manufacturer? And, keeping in mind that the average test drive doesn't include hooking up a ten-ton trailer, how might we all get a proper frame of reference when judging one massive diesel beast with another?


2011 Ford Super Duty pickup – Click above for high-res image gallery


2011 GMC Sierra Denali 3500 – Click above to enlarge


2011 GM HD Trucks - Click above for high-res image gallery


2011 Chevrolet Silverado HD – Click above for high-res image gallery


Passenger cars and light-duty trucks will be subjected to stringent new emission standards in the near future. Heavy-duty vehicles are not being left out of the mix and will have their own regulations intended to slowly lead to cleaner vehicles delivering goods across the nation. That's a good thing.


2011 GMC Sierra Denali HD – Click above for high-res image gallery


2011 Chevrolet Silverado HD – Click above for high-res image gallery


In Parts 1 and 2 of his 2007 Heavy Duty Shootout, Mike Levine and his cohorts from Pickuptruck.com compared the acceleration of gas three-quarter ton and diesel one-ton pickups from Dodge, Chevy/GMC and Ford on flat surfaces, both unloaded and loaded with 10,500-lb trailers. For the third and final report, however, Levine introduced grades of 7% and 15% to the equation.


Mike Levine from PickupTruck.com is our go-to guy for truck news. His brain is like the bed of a Ford F-450 filled with the esoteric details of heavy duty diesel pickups and 3/4-ton gassers. Plus, he's from the old school of automotive journalism and has made a successful transition to the web, which means his reporting is always knowledgeable and balanced despite it being delivered digitally. When Levine told us he was planning on doing a comprehensive comparo of today's heavy duty pickups, how


Click the Tundra for a high res gallery suitable for wallpaper


We're fired up about a few things for episode #61. We eventually get to an enthusiastic discussion of the American LeMans Series, but we wind our way through a few subjects to get there. We start off with the snub to Chrysler by some DCX shareholders who suggest a return to Daimler-Benz AG name. Not only is that a kick in the pants to the Chrysler group, but it's incredibly arrogant and illustrates that it was never really a merger of equals. In a froth, we move on to the anti-surprise that Niss


More powerful than a locomotive? That's what the folks over at Diesel Power are predicting for the future of trucks. Cars and trucks have become more powerful over the years, with today's torque figures dwarfing the 420 ft.-lbs. of torque figures commonly seen in trucks in the mid-1990s. While many factory numbers hit above 500 ft.-lbs. and aftermarket parts can launch drivers above 1,000 ft.-lbs., we have to be nearing the threshold of how big and bulky the transmissions can get and still be ef

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