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7Automakers forming consortium to combat hackers

The evolution of the connected car is raising one big, overwhelming concern: the threat of hackers compromising a car's systems. To counteract this, the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers and the Association of Global Automakers are teaming up to prevent black hats from trying to crack a vehicle's security systems.

14NHTSA closes book on Jeep 'trailer hitch' recall after all

After much debating and hand-wringing, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration now says it has "no reservations" with Chrysler's plan to recall certain Jeep Liberty and Grand Cherokee models over concerns that their fuel tanks, which are located behind the rear axle, could rupture or leak in the event of a rear impact. The longstanding argument between the two entities saw Chrysler openly defy the Feds after a request to recall 2.7 million units back in June.

177 months later, Jeep 'trailer hitch' recall still stalled

For the past few years, Chrysler and its CEO, Sergio Marchionne, have gone head-to-head with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and its boss, David Strickland, over the government safety agency's request for Chrysler to recall almost three-million Jeep vehicles due to what NHTSA says is a safety issue that has caused at least 51 deaths. After a three-year investigation and Chrysler's initial refusal to issue a recall because it deemed the vehicles safe and built to the day's fede

50NHTSA wants ignition lockouts for first-time DUI offenders [w/poll]

There could be additional crackdowns on first-time drunk drivers if the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration gets its way. The regulatory body wants all states to fit alcohol-detecting ignition interlocks the first time someone is charged with drunk driving in order to prevent them from getting behind the wheel while intoxicated again.

49NHTSA chief David Strickland leaving position

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration chief David Strickland, 45, is stepping down after heading the agency since January 2010, The Detroit News reports, but his plans after NHTSA haven't been announced. It's expected that he'll leave within the next couple of months, after which David Friedman, NHTSA's deputy director, will head the agency until a new chief is appointed.

71NHTSA claims power to regulate smartphones in cars, will issue guidelines next year

Back in April, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released voluntary guidelines covering the use of in-car infotainment and communications in the hopes that automakers would reconfigure their systems to make them safer. But on Tuesday, NHTSA administrator David Strickland said at a congressional hearing that the administration has the authority to set vehicle smartphone guidelines and will release new voluntary guidelines next year, casting a wider net than the ones released in A

99NHTSA denies Tesla asked for Model S fire probe

The Tesla Model S is being investigated by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration after three of the models caught fire; two of the electric cars impacted debris on the road, and one was involved in a single-car accident. This much we know for sure. Just exactly how the investigation came to be, though, is up for debate.

69Feds decide against investigating Tesla Model S fire

Despite earlier reports, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has announced it will not be filing a formal investigation into the fire that engulfed a Tesla Model S earlier this month, as the agency says there was no evidence to suggest the fire was due to a manufacturer defect or that the car was in violation of government-mandated safety standards, according to Automotive News.

29NHTSA may test recalled Jeep to see if trailer hitch fix works

Despite the fact that Chrysler and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration have compromised on last month's heated recall situation involving the Jeep Grand Cherokee and Liberty, it looks like the matter is still far from over. The Detroit News is reporting that NHTSA could end up crash testing the repaired vehicles, some of which are receiving Mopar trailer hitches to better protect the rear-mounted gas tank from being damaged during an accident.

115NHTSA looking for power to fast-track 'noncontroversial' auto laws

When it comes to any new regulation that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration deems "not controversial and therefore unlikely to receive adverse comment," it would like the power to implement the regulation without the standard period of public comment. It seeks the change in order to be able to clear and finalize "routine" rules in a matter of days. If NHTSA is granted the power it seeks, people could still comment on such regulations and request changes, but the agency could igno

32NHTSA mulling adding small-overlap and angled crash tests

For the sake of safer cars, it sounds like the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration could be moving to create stricter crash tests that are similar to (and potentially even more rigorous) than what the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety recently instituted. In an interview with Automotive News, chief NHTSA administrator David Strickland said that the agency is looking into adding a new offset test as well as an angled impact test.

30Feds ironing out rules for autonomous cars

With the increasing development of autonomous vehicles, and even some states issuing licenses for self-driving cars, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration decided it was high time to lay out a set of rules for these advanced vehicles. According to a Detroit News report, NHTSA is embarking on a research project that could take two to three years, at the conclusion of which, the administration will write rules to govern driverless cars.

44House Republicans urge White House to delay 2017-2025 fuel economy standards

Representatives from the Republican Party have asked President Obama to delay pushing through strict new automotive fuel economy regulations. The trio of top GOP legislators consists of auto dealer Mike Kelly of Pennsylvania, Jim Jordan (also of PA) and House Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Darrell Issa of California (pictured). The three legislators are calling for further review of the 2017-2025 Corporate Average Fuel Economy targets. According to a report by The Detroit News, Issa sa

136House Republicans urge White House to delay 2017-2025 fuel economy standards

Representatives from the Republican Party have asked President Obama to delay pushing through strict new automotive fuel economy regulations. The trio of top GOP legislators consists of auto dealer Mike Kelly of Pennsylvania, Jim Jordan (also of PA) and House Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Darrell Issa of California (pictured). The three legislators are calling for further review of the 2017-2025 Corporate Average Fuel Economy targets. According to a report by The Detroit News, Issa sa

35NHTSA head Strickland defends Toyota unintended acceleration probe

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Administrator David Strickland has released a letter defending the agency's handling of investigations into claims of unintended acceleration by Toyota owners. Republican Senator Charles Grassley has said questions remain about what caused unintended acceleration instances in the Japanese manufacturer's vehicles, specifically whether or not the trouble was caused by electronic glitches. Grassley specifically questioned whether NHTSA had the experien

18Gov't unsure on who can establish distracted driving laws

Turns out the federal government's attempts to create enforceable oversight of cellphone use in vehicles has hit a Swiftian snag: it seems there isn't a government agency specifically empowered with the authority to do so. The legislative boundaries of the Federal Communications Commission end at the phone itself, those of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration end at the vehicle itself. Neither is equipped to address how people combine the two while driving.

9NHTSA working with automakers to accelerate vehicle-to-vehicle communication

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration head-honcho David Strickland is big on emerging vehicle-to-vehicle communication, according to The Detroit Free Press. As a keynote speaker at the Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress in Detroit this week, Strickland lauded the technology, saying it could eliminate up to 80 percent of crashes.

18NHTSA wants to issue larger fines for safety and recall infractions

Toyota made all kinds of news during its recall woes, with one headline item being the record-breaking $32.4 million civil penalty it paid to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The charge was levied by NHTSA because it considered Toyota tardy in announcing its recalls, and was almost twice the additionally record-setting $16.4 million fine that Toyota paid to address the recall itself. According to a report in Reuters, though, NHTSA Administrator David Strickland believes that s

45GM CEO Akerson asked to testify at Volt hearing

It's a safe wager that no one expected the report of the Chevrolet Volt fire after a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration crash test to turn into a Congressional dressing-down. The short story: NHTSA crash-tested a Volt in May, that car caught fire in June while in storage, and NHTSA alerted the public about the fire in November. Certain politicians have wondered if politics played a part in waiting until November to report the fire, and now a House panel is holding a hearing called "V

28Report: NHTSA chief looking to augment safety arm's powers

Thanks to the barrage of Toyota recalls in recent months, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration has its eyes on more power. According to The Detroit News, David Strickland (pictured), who heads up the government safety agency, recently met with the Senate Commerce Committee to discuss his agency's need for the ability to order immediate recalls, halt production or stop the importation of vehicles that pose an imminent and significant safety risk. The House of Representatives

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