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In the global battle to reduce emissions, automakers have made considerable strides in boosting the fuel efficiency of internal combustion engines thanks to fuel-saving gadgets like turbochargers.

Hybrid and battery electric cars get most of the attention from drivers looking for more efficient transportation. Toyota has done a masterful job of marketing the benefits of hybrids and, for a great many people, hybrids are an excellent means of saving on fuel and reducing emissions (not everyone, though). The trouble is that hybrid systems add hardware, cost and a lot of complexity, especially for the control systems.

With the overall automotive market at best stagnant in recent years and in complete free fall in the past year, one way for suppliers to expand their revenues is to get into new product areas. Thus Continental, long known for tires, brake systems, fuel systems and more is getting into turbochargers. Over the next several years, turbos are expected to be a major growth area as automakers move to smaller displacement engines in pursuit of reduced fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.

Turbocharging is likely to be all the range in the next few years as automakers try to improve the mileage of high volume vehicles with downsized engines. Ford has already announced big plans for its EcoBoost engines starting with the 3.5L V6 that launches next spring. Across town at GM, the upcoming Chevy Cruze will get a new 1.4L turbocharged and direct injected engine. Ford will buying turbos from Honeywell for the EcoBoost engines and the supplier is apparently also talking to GM about a sup

Ford is planning to make a huge push for turbocharged engines starting in April 2009 with the introduction of the first in its line of EcoBoost engines. Honeywell Turbo Technologies will be supplying Ford with turbochargers for the 3.5L V6 and the followup four cylinder EcoBoost engines. Honeywell is estimating that turbocharged engines will go from 30 percent of global vehicle installations to 38 percent over the next five years. Ford and other manufacturers are adding direct injection and turb

Automotive supplier Bosch is now set to follow arch-rival Continental Automotive systems into the field producing turbochargers. Robert Bosch GmbH has received German regulatory approval to team up with MAHLE GmbH in a 50-50 joint venture called Bosch Mahle Turbo Systems GmbH & Co. KG. The new company will start operating on June 2 out of offices in Stuttgart. About 50 employees from each company will move over to the new company.

Car makers the world over are looking for the most cost effective ways to increase fuel economy as fuel prices continue to climb and CO2 limits and fuel economy standards come into force. One approach that seems to be appealing to most is adding direct fuel injection and turbocharging to smaller displacement engines. Continental Automotive Systems sees the trend and is jumping on the bandwagon. Continental has announced their intention to build their first turbocharger plant for production begin

With internal combustion engines set to continue playing a major role in automotive drivetrains for some time to come, technologies that can help improve efficiency are growing in demand. Two of the most popular at the moment are turbochargers and dual clutch transmissions (DCT). Both are seen as means to achieve significant improvements in efficiency at much lower cost than alternatives like hybrids. One of the chief suppliers of both of these components is BorgWarner.

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