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And so ends a chapter of Toyota's life in the U.S. it probably wants to forget.

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A rare 5000 from the post-unintended acceleration era.

Known as the Audi 100 outside of the United States, the 5000 sold pretty well — until 1986. Here's one of the 1987 models that sold, even after the "60 Minutes" report that doomed the model, found in a San Francisco Bay Area wrecking yard.

Commuters in Syracuse, NY, got a nasty surprise when an out of control pickup truck barreled down a ramp embankment last month and crashed through their bus.

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The notorious 5000 of the 60 Minutes debacle was an automatic. This one is a manual.

The Audi 5000 with automatic transmission was the car that brought the term "sudden unintended acceleration" into everyday use. Here's a rare 5-speed-equipped example in a Denver wrecking yard.

Recalls

Maserati is calling in over 28,000 Quattroporte and Ghibli sedans for unintended acceleration.

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Regulators Cite Pedal Error As Causes of Recent Toyota, Lexus Accidents

US safety regulators have rejected an electrical engineer's request to investigate low-speed unintended acceleration in Toyota and Lexus cars.

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NHTSA is considering whether to open an investigation into unintended acceleration claims in the 2009 Lexus ES350. An owner claims the sedan surged forward while pulling into a parking space in February 2015 and caused a crash.

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Following months of investigation, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has decided not to launch a deeper analysis or recall of 2006-2010 Toyota Corolla for alleged unintended acceleration.

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Toyota has been found 60 percent at fault for the unintended acceleration of a 1996 Camry, which was involved in a 2006 crash that killed three and sent a man to jail.

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Where General Motors and Takata have grabbed many auto safety-related headlines this year with their problems with ignition switches and airbag inflators, a few years ago, a similar sort of scrutiny fell on Toyota for unintended acceleration. After multiple settlements with various parties totaling billions of dollars, the issues seem largely behind the Japanese automaker now. Owners are actually starting to receive their money, but it isn't exactly breaking the bank. Payouts are expected to be

NHTSA inquiry covers about 1.69 million of the Corolla compact cars from the 2006 to 2010 model years

A U.S. safety agency is looking into a consumer's petition alleging that older Toyota Corollas can accelerate unexpectedly at low speeds and cause crashes.

Covers 360,000 Nissan Versa small sedans and hatchbacks

The U.S. government's road safety agency is investigating complaints that a trim panel can cause unwanted acceleration in Nissan Versa small cars.

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Depending on how you want to look at things, the US Attorney's Office $1.2-billion dollar settlement with Toyota in March over its unintended acceleration recall was either a big blow to the company or completely inconsequential. From January to March, net income fell five percent to 297 billion yen ($2.89 billion), compared to 313.9 billion yen ($3.05 billion) a year ago. However, the automaker still posted record full-year profits worldwide.

Official

UPDATE: Just like that, Toyota has released an official statement confirming its $1.2-billion dollar settlement with the US Attorney's Office. Our story has been updated to reflect this development and the automaker's official statement has been added below.

The criminal investigation focused on Toyota's reporting of unintended acceleration problems

The U.S. has reached a $1.2 billion settlement with Toyota Motor Corp., concluding a four-year criminal investigation into the Japanese automaker's disclosure of safety problems, according to a person close to the investigation.

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According to those all-too-nebulous "people familiar with the matter," Toyota is close to a settlement with the US federal government to end a criminal probe over its long-running unintended acceleration fiasco. Though Toyota has never admitted guilt, the deal could reportedly crest a billion dollars and would likely include a criminal deferred prosecution agreement, and while we're not legal experts, The Wall Street Journal explains that such a deal would "[force Toyota] to accept responsibilit

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So far, the lawsuits brought forth against Toyota for unintended acceleration have gone both ways: the automaker was found not at fault in a 2009 California crash and liable for a 2007 crash in Oklahoma. Both cases involved a Camry and resulted in fatalities. With a big chunk of these UA cases (around 200) set to his the docket of US District Judge James V. Selna in Santa Ana, California, Bloomberg is reporting that the judge has halted the lawsuits until March after Toyota and its lawyers have

Official

A jury has decided that faulty software was to blame for a crash involving a 2005 Toyota Camry that killed one woman and injured another. This is the first time Toyota has been found liable by a jury in a lawsuit involving sudden acceleration claims. Toyota has maintained that driver error is the most likely cause for cases of sudden acceleration.

Followup

Toyota has already paid out millions and billions of dollars in settlements surrounding unintended acceleration, but the first lawsuit in the matter, which headed to a California court in July, has reached a verdict. Following the 2009 death of Noriko Uno, whose 2006 Camry was hit by another car and then sped out of control before crashing into a tree, the jury found that Toyota was not at fault in the crash.

"bellwether" case could influence other unintended acceleration lawsuits

A verdict clearing Toyota Motor Corp. in the death of a California woman whose 2006 Camry apparently accelerated despite her efforts to stop could bode well for the Japanese automaker as it faces similar cases.