222 Articles
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Lyft now lets you pay for your Tinder date's ride

Lyft and Tinder hope this will jumpstart dating

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Uber and Lyft face challenges as they steer back toward profitability

Ongoing driver shortage and the spreading Delta variant are clouding their outlook

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Opinion
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Uber, Lyft want more public subsidies to meet California EV mandates

CARB wants 90% of ride-hailing miles to be electric by 2030

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Analysis: U.S. labor secretary likely to investigate gig employers like Uber

Millions of workers could ultimately become eligible for, say, OT or minimum wage

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Toyota acquires Lyft's self-driving unit for $550 million

It will be folded into the new Woven Planet subsidiary

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Drivers for Uber, Lyft and delivery services sue to overturn California Prop. 22

They say the ballot measure denying them employee status is unconstitutional

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California appeals court rules Uber, Lyft must reclassify drivers as employees

That is, unless the companies' Prop 22 ballot measure passes

While the ruling does not take effect before a Nov. 3 company-sponsored ballot measure that will give voters the chance to decide over the future status of gig workers, it narrows the companies' options should their ballot fail. The case emerged after California implemented a law, known as AB5, aimed at reclassifying ride-hail, food delivery and other app-based workers as employees entitled to benefits such as unemployment insurance and minimum wage. California in May sued Uber and Lyft for no

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Uber and Lyft spend big in California to oppose gig worker law

The companies claim most of their workers don't want to be full-time employees

The two ride-hailing companies would each face more than $392 million in annual payroll taxes and workers' compensation costs even if they drastically cut the number of drivers on their platforms, a Reuters calculation showed. The companies say they would need to significantly hike prices to offset at least some of those additional costs, which in turn would likely cause a decrease in consumer demand, but cushion the blow of the added costs to the bottom line.

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Judge grants Uber and Lyft a reprieve in California

The two ridesharing companies had threatened to shut down operations on Friday

Lyft in a blog post on Thursday said it would suspend its California operations at midnight. Uber in a blogpost said it would have to temporarily shut down unless the appeals court intervenes. Lyft shares dropped 6.2% to $26.41, while Uber shares were down 2.3% to $28.74.

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Uber may be forced to shut down California ride services over new driver ruling

Judge granted request for injunction preventing independent contractor classification

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Uber, Lyft blocked from classifying drivers as contractors in California

California is Uber’s and Lyft’s largest U.S. market

Rideshare drivers face difficult decision between physical and financial health

The loss of the extra $600-per-week unemployment benefit pushes some into a challenging situation

Uber driver Johan Nijman faces a difficult decision as federal unemployment aid expires: risk failing to pay for groceries and even lose his home, or resume driving and potentially catch COVID-19. Nijman is among thousands of Uber Technologies Inc and Lyft Inc drivers across the United States choosing between physical and financial health risks as $600 in additional weekly unemployment assistance expire. While drivers are not the only workers struggling, they are particularly vulnerable as the

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Lyft partners with rental group Sixt to target carless city dwellers

Rent a car through the ride-hailing app, bypass the rental counter to pick it up

Lyft users can book a designated car through the ride-hailing app, add insurance and extras and directly pick up the car from the rental lot without waiting at the counter. Lyft already runs a limited rental car program in Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area without the involvement of any car rental companies. "COVID has caused a change in behavior and people need different transportation options," Cal Lankton, Lyft's vice president of Fleet & Global Operations, said in an interview.

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Know your rights as a rideshare passenger

Especially in the time of coronavirus

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