5 Articles
EPA Administrator declares that CO2 CAN'T be considered for power plants!

With just weeks to go before the Bush administration cedes power, executive orders and regulatory decisions gutting all sorts of federal rules are flying out from Washington. One of the most recent has come from the office of EPA administrator Stephen Johnson. Johnson has decreed that the agency CANNOT consider greenhouse gas emissions in determining whether to grant permits for new power plants. This goes well beyond the Agency's previous neglect of the issue and actively prevents considering t

'Splain Yourself: Senator invites EPA chief to California

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Stephen Johnson (shown above) has found himself with few friends after denying California's request for a waiver to regulate its own emissions. The denial was issued shortly after President Bush signed the new energy bill into law, leaving some to wonder if the auto industry struck a deal with the White House - we'll give you your energy bill if you give us one national emissions standard to follow, i.e. don't allow California to set its own set of s

Congress scrutinizes EPA decision to deny states' rights over regulating emissions

Any celebration over having passed a new national energy bill with requirements to raise Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards to 35 mpg by 2020 was instantly tempered when the EPA denied the right of California and 16 other states to set their own emissions standards. California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger immediately vowed to fight back and sue the EPA over its decision.

Clearer skies through NOx legislation, smog levels down in East

In an annual report, the Environmental Protection Agency stated that smog levels have dramatically dropped for 19 Eastern states covering roughly 1/3 of the nation's population. The reduction is primarily due to fewer emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from industrial plants and manufacturing facilities. According to the report, NOx emissions went from 1.2 million tons in 2000 to 530,000 tons in 2005. Other major sources of NOx are vehicle exha