4 Articles

The last in our series of reports from the discussion panels from last week's Austin Alt Car expo focuses on the panel that had the broadest possible appeal: an overview of plug-in hybrids. Taking place on the Saturday, and therefore more accessible to the working public, the free-form panel featured Ron Johnston-Rodriguez of PluginCenter.com and the Port of Chelan County in Washington State, and Chelsea Sexton of Plug-In America. Austan Librach, who works for Austin Energy and Plug-in Partners

When the U.S. Congress passed H.R. 1424 and President Bush signed it into law today, not everyone was paying attention to the part about plug-in vehicles. Sure, this got a little play - and green car sites like ours were on it - but what's a few $7,500 tax credits in a $700 billion bill? Still, there are a lot of parts to the bill (read one take here) to digest and we're happy to explore the green car-related details a bit.

AutoblogGreen reader Michael V. is worried. With all of the work being done on plug-in vehicles by automakers large and small, he thinks a slew of propriety batteries, chargers and plugs will effectively kill (well, at least hurt) the widespread adoption of plug-in vehicles. Instead of just worrying, though, Michael wrote an open letter to the auto industry, which he sent to us and we've pasted after the jump, about this issue.

Many of you were critical of USA Today for publishing an article recently about a study on the relative cleanliness of plug-in vehicles. Those of you who joined the criticism have something in common with the Electric Drive Transportation Association, which has sent a letter to USA Today's editor that calls the article misleading and