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Mitsubishi Chemical has responded to the expected rise in demand for hybrid and electric vehicles by announcing its intentions to boost supply of anode materials for lithium-ion batteries by 130 percent by next May. The company's current anode material output, listed at 3,000 tons, should reach 5,000 tons by the end of December and 7,000 tons in eight month's time.

By now we're all aware that the environmental impact of cars and trucks goes well beyond the emissions produced during operation. There is the energy used to produce and dispose of the vehicles and their components, for example, and the cost of getting the fuel for the vehicles out of the ground and into the tank. The impact of making nickel metal hydride batteries for hybrid and electric vehicles (EVs) was the center-piece of a controversial study published by CNW several years ago. That study

Norwegian electric vehicle builder Think has finally launched production of the lithium-ion battery version of its City EV. The 22 kilowatt-hour battery pack is being supplied by Indiana-based Enerdel which owns an equity stake in Think. Enerdel is now in full volume production of the new battery pack which, should allow Think to ramp up vehicle production and expand into continental Europe and then the United States later this year.

Massachusetts-based A123 Systems has been one of the rising stars of the lithium battery field in the last several years. In spite of that, the company that was started by a team of MIT researchers has struggled to raise cash to manufacture automotive cells in the United States.

Not too long ago, some analysts were predicting a big oversupply of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles. Yeah, that sounded strange to us, too. Oliver Hazimeh, the director and dead of Global E-Mobility Practice for global management consulting firm PRTM, has now issued a statement saying that these estimates are "largely unfounded," and warns that there are "potential shortfalls looming." Those words might be just as unfounded, but Hazimeh's numbers predict that the market will be askin

Over the last decade, billions of consumer electronics devices have been built and powered by lithium ion batteries and cars appear to be the next big li-ion applications. Even with all the lithium ion battery production that exists today however, capacity remains nowhere near where it needs to be to power all the plug-ins that are coming. Just think of the Tesla Roadster, which relies on standard 18650 cells like those used in laptop computers. A laptop typically uses six to nine of these cells