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According to The Detroit News, the U.S. House of Representatives has voted to block the Environmental Protection Agency from moving toward a higher blend of ethanol in America's gasoline. Representatives voted 286-135 against allowing the EPA to issue a waiver that would allow gas stations to sell E15. Currently, fueling stations are only allowed to sell E10, which contains up to 10 percent of the biofuel. The new legislation would allow a 50-percent increase in the amount of ethanol sold in eac

Now that we've covered the ethanol-related debate surrounding a move from E10 to E15 from almost every angle, it's time to move on to a discussion about E12. With the Environmental Protection Agency choosing to postpone its decision regarding E15 until further testing can be conducted, an interim move to E12 is now the suggested solution by farmers, ethanol blenders and proponents of renewable fuels.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) governs the amount of ethanol usedd in gasoline. The current standard blend stands at ten percent (E10). With farmers wielding pitchforks in anger, the EPA agreed to consider raising the ethanol blend to 15 percent (E15), a move that would avoid hitting the blend wall. As Green Car Advisor reports, the time to decide whether to move to E15 has come, but once again, the EPA has postponed, saying that more testing is needed before a final decision can be m

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets rules about the amount of ethanol found in gasoline that flows from the nation's pump. The current standard for blending ethanol with gasoline stands at ten percent (E10). With farmers holding pitchforks in the air in anger because they want to put more corn into cars, the EPA agreed to consider raising the ethanol blend to 15 percent (E15), a move that would avoid hitting the blend wall. As Green Car Advisor reports, the time to decide whether or

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be faced with a decision on the future of ethanol soon and no matter what choice is made, it won't be a popular one. Ethanol producers are pushing the EPA to raise the blend level in gasoline to 15 percent (E15), but automakers and oil companies are pushing back with hopes of keeping the current 10 percent level (E10).

Ethanol has been blended with gasoline for years now in a fuel typically called E10 (which is made with 10 percent ethanol). E15 could soon become the new norm if, as industry experts predict, the U.S. reaches the "blend wall" and changes come soon.

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