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Let them drill, says the U.S. Department of the Interior. On Monday, regulators approved Shell's offshore plan that calls for the drilling of three exploratory wells in the Gulf of Mexico. Then, on Tuesday, Exxon Mobil was granted approval to drill in the deep waters of the Gulf, marking the fourth deepwater permit issued since the disastrous BP oil spill.

It's near impossible to forget that back in April of 2010, the Deepwater Horizon burst into flames, sunk into the sea and spewed oil for months. In early May, President Obama declared that no additional deepwater drilling efforts would commence until measures were in place to prevent this type of disaster. Then, in October of 2010, U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Ken Salazar, announced that deepwater drilling would resume. Earlier this month, Salazar said that he expects to sign off on a "signif

Back in April of 2010, the Deepwater Horizon burst into flames and sank into the sea. For months, clean-up crews worked to contain the oil that spewed out at a rapid rate. In early May, President Obama announced that no additional deepwater drilling efforts would commence until measures to prevent the recurrence of this type of disaster were in place. Well, last October, the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Ken Salazar, announced that deepwater drilling would resume.

In response to BP's catastrophic oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, President Barack Obama immediately placed a six-month moratorium on deep-water drilling efforts, a move which affected 33 deep-water drilling projects. While many people initially applauded Obama's decision, public sentiment in the U.S. has now changed. The numbers from a recent Bloomberg National Poll paint a vivid picture of American desires to continue extracting the black gold from under the sea bed despite the accident that t