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Improvements in fuel economy of up to 22.4 percent on the ARTEMIS test cycle (pdf), which represents typical real-world usage, have been demonstrated by a research vehicle fitted with a flywheel hybrid system that includes stop-start technology.

Adding an electric motor and battery to a vehicle is just one of many ways to create a hybrid. We've seen hydraulic hybrids being tested in a variety of commercial vehicle applications. Torotrak has an altogether different mechanical system based on flywheels. The Torotrak system first came to our attention a couple of years ago when the FIA proposed allowing kinetic energy recovery systems on Formula One cars. Subsequently, at least two F1 teams licensed the Torotrak system for use, but none ar

Future vehicles from Jaguar Land Rover could use a flywheel-based hybrid powertrain now that the automaker is reportedly working with British transmission specialist Torotrak, the same company that helped develop the KERS hybrid system that's currently being tested in Formula 1 racing. Most hybrid vehicles recapture energy that would normally be lost to braking by using the electric motor(s) as a generator, sending power back to the batteries. In Torotrak's system, the recaptured braking forces

Do your remember the hybrid system that stores braking energy not as electricity but in a rotating flywheel as kinetic energy? Well, the system is going to be mated to a special CVT transmission able to change 6-to-1 ratio within one revolution. That is, in 50 ms, the transmission can go to almost zero to full power.

For the past several years the governing body of Formula One racing has been pondering rule changes that would, among other things, make the sport more environmentally friendly. One of the proposals that has popped up several times is using hybrid drivetrains. Transmission builders Torotrak and Xtrac have agreed to a license agreement that will let Xtrac build continuously variable transmissions based on Torotraks design for Formula One hybrid drive systems.