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One recent accident in upstate New York may have been the ultimate crash test for the Chevrolet Volt extended-range plug-in vehicle.

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Early reports are filtering in this morning of an explosion at a General Motors Technical Center battery research lab in Warren, Michigan. According to The Detroit News, a battery exploded injuring one or two people.

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General Motors has launched an advertising campaign touting the safety of the Chevrolet Volt extended-range plug-in electric vehicle, just as its CEO testified to Congress that a recent Volt fire that took place after a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration crash test would never occur under real-world circumstances, Bloomberg has reported.

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What a surprise. Today's Congressional hearing over the Chevrolet Volt fire and the resulting investigation by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration turned out to be contentious.

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What a surprise. Today's Congressional hearing over the Chevrolet Volt fire and the resulting investigation by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration turned out to be contentious.

Official

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's official word on the Chevrolet Volt fire incident is out, and it's all good. Following a two-month investigation into the crash test that resulted in a fire three weeks after the fact last summer, NHTSA says it "does not believe that Chevy Volts or other electric vehicles pose a greater risk of fire than gasoline-powered vehicles." Going further, NHTSA said the the Volt is safe to drive because, "no discernible defect trend exists and that the

Official

The National Higway Traffic Safety Administration has officially closed the book on its investigation into the Chevrolet Volt. The result finds that "no discernible defect trend exists" and "Based on the available data, NHTSA does not believe that Chevy Volts or other electric vehicles pose a greater risk of fire than gasoline-powered vehicles."

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It's a safe wager that no one expected the report of the Chevrolet Volt fire after a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration crash test to turn into a Congressional dressing-down. The short story: NHTSA crash-tested a Volt in May, that car caught fire in June while in storage, and NHTSA alerted the public about the fire in November. Certain politicians have wondered if politics played a part in waiting until November to report the fire, and now a House panel is holding a hearing called "V

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General Motors has prepared an advertising campaign that would be launched in the event that more reports of Chevrolet Volt fires generate public interest or a Congressional hearing, USA Today reported, citing GM Chief Marketing Officer Joel Ewanick. The advertisements are "honest" and "straightforward" and would direct people to a website that would spell out why the automaker believes the extended range plug-in hybrids are safe, Ewanick told the newspaper.

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The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has confirmed the Obama administration didn't ask the government agency to delay announcing potential safety issues with the Chevrolet Volt. According to The Detroit News, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood was briefed about Volt fires that occurred after two crash tests in September, three months after the first extended-range hybrid began smoldering. According to the report, the office of the president was then informed of the fires shortly t

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The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has confirmed the Obama administration didn't ask the government agency to delay announcing potential safety issues with the Chevrolet Volt. According to The Detroit News, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood was briefed about Volt fires that occurred after two crash tests in September, three months after the first extended-range hybrid began smoldering. According to the report, the office of the president was then informed of the fires shortly t

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The Chevrolet Volt is about to get safer. That's the big message from GM today as the company announced structural and cooling system "safety enhancements" that are intended to better distribute the car's energy load from a crash and, thus, better protect the battery from potential fires.

Official

The Chevrolet Volt is about to get safer. That's the big message from GM today as the company announced structural and cooling system "safety enhancements" that are intended to better distribute the car's energy load from a crash and, thus, better protect the battery from potential fires.

Nissan representatives have long been proud of the durability of the air-cooled, 24-kWh lithium-ion battery pack that stores energy in the Leaf. Given the recent troubles that the liquid-cooled pack in the Chevy Volt has given GM, it's perhaps not surprising that Nissan wants to reassure – carefully – the public that it still believes the Leaf pack is safe.

The latest article we've found about the Chevrolet Volt/NHTSA crash test fire incident mentions a word we've not heard uttered before: recall.

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Regular readers probably know the story of the Chevrolet Volt NHTSA post-crash fire by heart, but here are the important details as a refresher: The original car that triggered the investigation was crash tested by NHTSA in May. Three weeks later, in early June, the same car caught fire while in storage. The outside world first heard about the incident in November.

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Regular readers probably know the story of the Chevrolet Volt NHTSA post-crash fire by heart, but here are the important details as a refresher: The original car that triggered the investigation was crash tested by NHTSA in May. Three weeks later, in early June, the same car caught fire while in storage. The outside world first heard about the incident in November.

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Spontaneous combustion concerns weeks after a crash may prompt General Motors to spend about $1,000 per Chevrolet Volt to fix, according to a report from Reuters. The proposed fixes, which would cost a total of $9 million, would likely include reinforcements around vulnerable areas of the car's battery pack, lamination of electric circuitry and better protection for the coolant system to stop leaks.

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Spontaneous combustion concerns weeks after a crash may prompt General Motors to spend about $1,000 per Chevrolet Volt to fix, according to a report from Reuters. The proposed fixes, which would cost a total of $9 million, would likely include reinforcements around vulnerable areas of the car's battery pack, lamination of electric circuitry and better protection for the coolant system to stop leaks.