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A Softer, More Civilized Coupe, But At What Cost?

Has BMW lost its edge with this more civilized 228i xDrive Coupe? We test one for a week to find out.


A Smooth Diesel Covers Up Some Wrinkles

Will a beloved diesel engine be enough to kickstart the heart of BMW's aging flagship luxury sedan?


Drop The Top And Raise The Bar

The 2015 BMW 228i Convertible is a more grown-up take on the small premium convertible than was the outgoing 128i... though it may be a bit less special, too.


Things Are Getting Weird, Quickly

BMW's fast and funky X6 M is staggeringly capable at getting from point to point, but requires a unique person to get behind the wheel. We drive the new-for-2015 version of the sporting crossover coupe, and report in.


The Art Of Polarization, Take Two

BMW's X6 has proven to be an unlikely hit – so much so that the Bavarians have followed up with this kid brother X4 for 2015, a genre-splitting model that promises to be all things to all people. We spent a week with it to find out if it's worth the extra dough over the X3 upon which it's based.


Bavaria's High-Riding Hunchback Stays The Course

Most everyone would agree that BMW offers a range of very attractive and well-proportioned coupes, sedans, crossovers and wagons. Yet there is one member of its family that has always struck us as a bit odd: the X6.


Building A Better Bimmer

The last time the Dinan name graced the pages of Autoblog, Michael Harley was waxing poetic about the S3-R BMW 1M Coupe, a car that still stands in his ranks as one of the best cars he's ever driven. And that wasn't just because it was, you know, amazing. It's because as far as tuners go, Dinan produces some seriously well-executed products. Harley said of the 1M, for example, "It was so fully formed and well-rounded that it felt like BMW itself had made it."


Germany Goes Cafe Cool, Finally Embraces Customization

BMW is taking a page from the Harley-Davidson playbook with its groundbreaking R NineT. A retro cafe racer with an urban hooligan twist, the bike is fully customizable from fork to exhaust. Of course, any motorcycle can be customized, but the fact that BMW has built its newest bike to encourage modification using parts that can be swapped with simple tools is a radical move for a motorcycle maker best known for its plug-and-play touring bikes.


Latest To Challenge The Term 'Coupe' Is A Pretty One

It's hard to say what a coupe is anymore. Is it merely a car with two doors? Does it have to have an arching roofline? Do frameless windows count for anything? Can a five-door hatchback or even an SUV be a coupe? At some point in the last few years, nearly everything we thought made a coupe a coupe has been challenged by something that calls itself a coupe, but to most people isn't. Our friends at BMW have led most of this line of questioning.


After A Quarter-Million X6 Sales, Munich Goes Back To The Well

BMW has been in the line-blurring business of late, with the original X5 "Sports Activity Vehicle" muddling the line between SUVs and sport sedans in 1999, the 5 Series Gran Turismo challenging what our definition of "Gran Turismo" means in 2009, and pretty, low-roofed four-doors like the 6 Series Gran Coupe and the fresh new 4 Series Gran Coupe broadening the meaning of the word "coupe."


Say Hello To The 198-MPH Cure For The Common M6 Gran Coupe

Alpina has been lovingly modifying BMWs for half a century, but as we learned during a tour of the company's HQ in Buchloe, Germany, Alpina has been in the wine distribution business for nearly as long. The company has an estimated million bottles on reserve in two warehouses and a beautiful wine cellar/tasting room on property in western Bavaria, just yards from where its 1,500 hand-crafted automobiles per year are produced.


The No-Compromise Four-Door M

BMW's all-new M3 Sedan is dynamically nearly identical to its two-door M4 Coupe sibling: a stopwatch reveals that both are sub-four-second cars to 60 miles per hour, a racetrack proves that the mechanical twins are equally as adept on a road course and a full afternoon of driving on public roads demonstrates that each possesses talented everyday adaptability.


Rising To The Next Rung Up The Ladder

Launched out of the seat by a huge, unexpected dip in the road, yet still held largely in place by the smooth webbing of my safety belt, I clench my teeth waiting to come back to earth. A tenth of a second later, the M4 Coupe touches down and my body is slammed into the leather seat cushion. All of the air is forced out of my lungs upon landing, but the BMW's chassis, suspension and steering appear unfazed. Pleasantly surprised, I mash the accelerator to the floor in giddy pursuit of the car in


Sensual Design Complements Technical Brilliance

The most important thing to keep in mind while driving BMW's all-new i8 is that it's not a product of the company's vaunted M division.


Grand Stature Yes, Ultimate Driving Machine No

"The Ultimate Driving Machine" has been BMW's tagline for nearly 40 years. Launched in the 1970s, the marketing campaign was a stroke of genius by ad firm Ammirati & Puris, as the phrase helped differentiate the imported Bavarian cars from their fellow European rivals by subtly pointing out that Mercedes-Benz and Audi were offering luxury models, while BMW was selling sporty and youthful driving dynamics. The campaign worked – some would argue that stands among the most effective ad ca


Form, Function, And Frugality

There's a running joke among auto writers that the perfect car would be a diesel-powered, rear-drive wagon with manual transmission and no power accessories whatsoever. It would only be available in brown and would somehow be as fun to drive as a Mazda MX-5 Miata. Makes total sense, right?


Diesel Power Makes For A First-Class Five

I absolutely love to travel, but man, do I hate flying. Not the act of flying itself, but air travel in general – slogging through the airport, dealing with security, fighting with delays, only to finally be crammed like cattle into a too-small airplane seat where you're offered $8 sandwiches that are half-frozen. (Okay, it's not always that bad, but still.)

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