Ford announced today that it has determined the problem and has worked up a fix for the engine fires that have resulted in recalls for 2013 Ford Escape and Fusion models equipped with the 1.6-liter EcoBoost engine. Ford says the fires are being caused by an issue with the cooling system software that fails to properly manage engine temperatures during "unique overheating conditions," which are allowing the engines to get hot enough to start a fire while running. This is the third link to engine fires with faulty fuel lines being the culprit back in July and leaking coolant in September.

To prevent the overheating, Ford will be updating the software for the cooling system, but until then, the automaker says that owners of affected vehicles should not drive their vehicles and contact the dealer to arrange alternative transportation. According to Automotive News, this means that 73,320 owners are still in rental cars costing Ford up to $55 per day. None of the other engines used in these vehicles are involved in the recall.

Scroll down for more details on this recall including contact information for affected owners.
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Ford Produces Fix in Voluntary Safety Recall of 2013 Escapes, 2013 Fusions with 1.6-liter Engines

-Ford today announced a corrective action to address potential engine overheating that could result in engine fires in 2013 Ford Escape SE and SEL models with the 1.6-liter engine and 2013 Ford Fusion SE and SEL models with the 1.6-liter engine

-Ford will make updates to the cooling system software to better manage engine temperatures during a unique overheating condition. Original cooling system design was not able to address a loss of coolant system pressure under certain operating conditions. The new software will resolve this issue

-Escapes equipped with the 2.0-liter and 2.5-liter engines are unaffected as are Fusions equipped with 2.5-liter and hybrid engines

-Ford remains absolutely committed to continuously improving and providing the highest-quality vehicles to its customers. When a potential issue is identified, Ford acts promptly on behalf of customers


DEARBORN, Mich., Dec. 10, 2012 – Ford Motor Company today announced a corrective action to address potential engine overheating that could result in engine fires in SE and SEL models of the 2013 Ford Escape and Ford Fusion models equipped with 1.6-liter engines. The vehicles were subjects of a voluntary safety recall announced Nov. 30.

An intensive, cross-discipline engineering team at Ford worked to identify the root cause of the extreme engine overheating condition.

To fix the condition, Ford will make software updates to the cooling system of the 1.6-liter engine available in the SE and SEL models of the 2013 Ford Escape and 2013 Ford Fusion. The software updates will better manage engine temperatures during a unique overheating condition that could occur under unique operating conditions. The original cooling system design was not able to address a loss of coolant system pressure under certain operating conditions, which could lead to a vehicle fire while the engine was running.

"We remain absolutely committed to continuously improving and providing the highest-quality vehicles to our customers. When a potential issue is identified, we act promptly on behalf of our customers, as we did this time," said Raj Nair, Ford Group Vice President, Global Product Development.

Ford is now working to deliver the software and repair procedure to its dealers. The company will begin notifying customers so they can schedule service appointments with dealers.

Beginning early next week, customers will be able to get the software update at their dealer. The time needed for this repair is less than one-half day. However, due to service
scheduling requirements, a dealer may need the vehicle for a longer period of time.

Until the cooling software is updated, customers driving 2013 Escape vehicles equipped with the 1.6-liter engine and 2013 Fusion models equipped with the 1.6-liter engine have been advised to contact their dealer to arrange for alternative transportation at no charge.

Some drivers who have experienced high engine temperatures followed by engine fires have said that their clusters have shown the message "Engine Power Reduced to Lower Temps" or "Engine over temp, stop safely." Some also indicated that their instrument clusters sounded a chime and illuminated a red light.

Ford advised drivers who see any of these indications to safely pull off the road as soon as possible, turn off the engine and exit the vehicle.

Notifications have been sent to customers affected by the recall. Customers also can see if they are affected by the recall by:


-Checking their 17-digit VIN, located on a label on the driver door opening, at the base of the windshield on the driver's side of their vehicle, or on their vehicle registration. In vehicles with 1.6-liter engines, the eighth character will be "X" on Escapes or "R" on Fusions;
-Logging onto Ford.com, click "View Notices and Recalls" in the "Support" tab and inputting their VIN;
-Calling 866-436-7332 in the U.S. or 888-222-7814 in Canada;
-or Contacting a Ford dealer

2013 Escapes equipped with 2.0-liter and the 2.5-liter engines are unaffected. 2013 Fusions equipped with the 2.5-liter and hybrid engines are also unaffected – as are all Titanium models.

About Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 172,000 employees and 65 plants worldwide, the company's automotive brands include Ford and Lincoln. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford and its products worldwide, please visit http://corporate.ford.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 136 Comments
      Colbert
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hate the fact that I have to deal with this recall, but I really like my 2013 Excape.
      j.because1
      • 2 Years Ago
      Have owned the new Escape for about 2 months before the recall and knew about the previous recalls. Fell in like before it was released and was sold after the test drive. Even rented one for about a week during the summer. At the start of the latest recall, the first rental I was given was a Mazda 2 which I kept for a few days. I really needed a bigger vehicle since the holidays are forthcoming. So the Enterprise Gods gave me a 2013 Ford Escape as a rental, same color as my vehicle. Lucky me? This one must have a different engine since it was not affected by the recall. It is a SEL model as well. I still like the Escape but I thought that the software fix may have seemed a little convenient as an solution. Since the fire issue is a global one then I hope Ford does the necessary testing. For owners who want to Ford to buy back their vehicles, it should be allowed without any additional expense. The same courtesy for owners who want a different engine. I knew during its first year out there may be issues but this is major and seems embarrassing. Some say the issue is minor? Not sure if I am totally comfortable with the solution. Week 3 is upon us and I am missing my Escape. It has more technology. I've made calls to the service dept at the dealer but have heard nothing from Ford except for the recall letter. Never given a definite timeframe. The service department was clueless about the timeframe but was told it would be at least two weeks. The recall was reported as early as Nov. 30. I turned in my vehicle on Dec. 4th and did not hear from Ford until the 5th officially, recall letter followed a week later.
      CJ_313
      • 2 Years Ago
      This issue seems to have affected people who don't even own these vehicles. I've been trying to rent a car for over a week here in Metro Detroit, most rental car agencies have been completely fresh out of vehicles due to this recall. A representative for Enterprise told me that they lost a few vehicles out of their fleet due to it, and have been sold out of their remainding cars at most locations since the recall began. Interesting domino effect.
      whofan
      • 2 Years Ago
      Overheating is a real concern given a modern engine is mostly aluminium and plastic. The old engines were cast iron and steel with very little aluminium they could take some abuse. What are the engine bay temperatures with these new small turbo charged engines? I wonder if Ford is expecting too much from too little?
      Ricardo
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ford is on fire with new model lineup! Ecoboost models are HOT! Ford sales heating up! One more. Ford customers all fired up with new models!
        Jared Schwager
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ricardo
        I don't know why people are voting you down. I thought this was pretty funny and I own a Ford and love it!
          hgeorgech
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jared Schwager
          yes, that '72 Maverick of yours is a winner ...
          Jesus!
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jared Schwager
          Probably because its already been said and done again and again and again.
      Monthra 77
      • 2 Years Ago
      I've posted this before, and it seems the evidence is stacking in my favor. It's too small of an engine being asked to move too big of a vehicle. It has both weight acting against it and being force inducted which adds heat. The 2.5 and the 2.0 ecoboost are not having this problem. If I was Ford, and I'm armchair CEO'ing here. I would drop the 1.6 Ecoboost out of anything bigger than the Focus. Keep the 2.5 as the base for the Fusion and Escape. The 2.0 Ecoboost as the midrange motor and reintroduce the 3.7L V-6 as the top dog motor. Problem solved.
        Neouka
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Monthra 77
        Alternate solution: 2.0L Duratorq diesel. That engine would suit the Escape perfectly, and help its highway fuel economy greatly. Diesel is cheaper than gas here in Canada too, I'd buy one the second it comes out! I have a mk3 Focus right now but I love the new Escape.
          Monthra 77
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Neouka
          Diesels don't sell in the US. Ford needs all the sales they can get.
        Brandon Allen
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Monthra 77
        Keep in mind, tiny, tiny engines have been put in larger cars in Japan and Europe for ages. It's nothing new to put a 1.6L engine in a 3,500 lb car there. There's less metal in a smaller engine which makes it actually easier to cool. It's engine wear you're concerned about when you put smaller engines in larger vehicles making more power. Fewer pistons, rods and bearings means each take a higher % of the stress exerted on the engine and go through more combustion cycles per RPM. A Piston in a V8 will see roughly 1/2 as many combustion cycles as an equally powered and equally geared ecoboost 4 cyl engine for a roughly equivalent amount of miles. Usually, you wind out a smaller engine MORE than a larger one so I bet there's closer to 2.5x the number of combustion cycles per cylinder on an ecoboost 4cyl per mile than the V8. THAT is cause for concern, the heat can easily be dealt with.
          chanonissan
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Brandon Allen
          You hit the nail head, this has nothing to do with the engine size as in Japan and Europe has small engines. Nissan Juke With a small 1.6 turbo engine and is a cuv, and it being around more than two years started in Europe, now present in USA more than a year with no heating issue.
      404 not found
      • 2 Years Ago
      The software fix is a cheap band aid. Engines this day in age should not be overheating. Period.
        icemilkcoffee
        • 2 Years Ago
        @404 not found
        Cars will overheat every so often. But a car should not catch fire every time it overheats. That is the real problem.
        Jesus!
        • 2 Years Ago
        @404 not found
        You have no clue. You do realize as new technologies emerge issues will happen. New cars should not rattle, squeak, or fail in any way but guess what? They all still do and always will. They will never be perfect. I don't see any other automaker putting their balls out creating a lineup of all new engines for fuel efficiency. Can you tell me anyone else doing that at the moment? Did not think so.
          chanonissan
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jesus!
          New cars does have problem, but to what level? This is the most outstanding one, that the engine catches fire.
      michigan
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ford never bothered to recall the CVH engine like they should have. Such an embarrassment to them they just swept it under the rug and hoped everyone would forget about it. A garbage product and they know it, they refuse to stand behind it and correct their errors.
        Tiberius1701
        • 2 Years Ago
        @michigan
        OK...having been with Ford dealers for over 20 years and was with them when the CVH was in it's infancy..what are you referring to?? The fact that if you didn't service the timing belt at the appropriate interval (on pre 19851/2 engines) it might break and bend valves?? This is like sooo many European (read far superior /sarc ) engines that still are interference design. Please explain. Other than this (which ford did have an extended repair policy that would cover early failures) they were pretty darn reliable, albeit a bit on the gutless side.
      Toronto St. Pats
      • 2 Years Ago
      We have determined how to fix our exploding engines: have Honda build everything. lol
        Jesus!
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Toronto St. Pats
        Because Honda never did anything wrong..**cough faulty transmissions cough**
          merlot066
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jesus!
          Ummm, I'm not even a big racing fan and I know Ford has plenty of awesome racing engines. Ford is an excellent engine maker. There is nothing wrong with the design of this engine, just bad fuel lines from the supplier, incorrectly installed coolant plugs (on very early production models), and a software bug.
          Toronto St. Pats
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jesus!
          Honda builds motorcycles that rev at 10,000 rpm that go past 100,000 km without a as much as a hiccup, much less a cough. Guess which company I'm going to trust more to build a reliable and fail-proof vehicle? Objectively speaking the one with a better record. Sure they've also had problems, if they hadn't, I'd be seriously frightened because that would border on the supernatural.
          chanonissan
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jesus!
          It does not look good on Ford's part, this engine should have been tested in every condition, yes we can under stand the faulty lines with one recall, but to have several recalls of two vehicles in such short times, total to about 5 recalls on both the Fusion and the C-max, latest recall head lights, that is awful. Nissan has a 1.6 turbo, Hyundia have an 1.6 turbo, Bmw has a 1.6 turbo and none of these engines have this problem.
          chanonissan
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jesus!
          And I know the Nissan Juke had ONE recall for stalling without warning, but no fires.
        Brodz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Toronto St. Pats
        You mean the company that was so obsessed with air cooling at one stage? So much so, they made a car in the seventies with an aircooled inline 4. The engine would get so hot that you could cook on the hood. Yeah... that company, gotcha.
        ghass.greg
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Toronto St. Pats
        You mean the Honda Co. that just recalled 870,000 vehicles?! They all do it. Wake up snapperhead.
      greenz1977
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ford designs some great looking cars that probably should have spent more time in the testing phase to catch any design flaws. This has been the issue with their diesel engines in their trucks since about 2004. Ford usually fixes the problems within the first couple of years, but who wants to beta test cars for Ford when it should have been right to begin with?
        • 2 Years Ago
        @greenz1977
        [blocked]
      Zoom
      • 2 Years Ago
      Note to self: never buy an initial run of a new Ford model. They can't seem to introduce a new car without a host of recalls.
        Dean Hammond
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Zoom
        rubbish....although YES, theres been a few too many black eyes...
          Dean Hammond
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          Al, you do relize they make more than just the 203 Escape and Fusion correct? aside from that there have been pretty much zero mechanical issues that will leave you carless..... I WILL say though, as cars "progress" with more and more software you WILL be seeing more issues with things such as infotainment and electronically controlled transmissions, which are annoyances for sure, but that will apply to ALL manufacturers, I dont think anyone is safe from all the complexity apparently being demanded by consumers.....computers can be fickle....witness all the recalls THIS year alone, I cantr remember it ever being this exstensive...
          Dean Hammond
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          over9000, not sure that was directed at me , however ive personally owned several initial release vehicles, and YET to have any issues....ANY issues....so , if it was directed at me , then please, provide something that baacks the comment up....name callings not an issue, that doesnt bother me
          Al Terego
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          Rubbish but yes...mmmkay
        Walt
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Zoom
        As opposed to buying anything from Toyota that will have at least 4 defects the day you drive it off the lot. The only difference is, with Ford you'll hear about them right away and they'll be fixed. With Toyota you won't know for years about the defects. They'll eventually be recalled, provided you don't die in your Toyota first!
          Dean Hammond
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Walt
          Walt, main issues have been MFT, and programming of the Focus and Fiesta trans,..all were software issues, thus my point about computers as a whole......and the more complex vehicles become, the more "software issues" we will experience, mechanically the cars have been mostly excellent....MOSTLY.....
          ghass.greg
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Walt
          Amen Walt. Toyota had engines blowing up at 10K miles and blaming the customer. Media ignored it almost completely.
        Jesus!
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Zoom
        Explorer, F150, Flex, Mustang, last gen Fusion and one before it all went well. Edge as well.
        ghass.greg
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Zoom
        Another note to self: Bank at least $5000 for BMW repairs by 70,000 miles. Then keep saving $$
      m_2012
      • 2 Years Ago
      So this is software to control the engine during an overheat condition? That is nothing new and complex - cuts cylinders, runs rich, and shuts the engine down if things get too hot. Think 90's Northstar. The question is - why is the engine overheating in the first place? This software is out of the loop until there is a physical problem. What are they doing to fix the overheat situation in the first place.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @m_2012
        [blocked]
          Dean Hammond
          • 2 Years Ago
          uh huh....not exactly a post that exudes common sense.....
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