Hagerty Insurance, which specializes in covering cars already deemed classics, is out with its annual Hot List predicting this year's ten cars that will be future collectibles. Even though it stays under $100,000, it spans almost $74,000 in MSRPs starting with the $23,700 Ford Focus ST on the affordable end and peaking with the $97,395 SRT Viper.

Other notables include the Chevrolet Corvette Convertible 427, what with 2013 being both the 60th anniversary of the brand and the last year of the C6, the 505-horsepower 427 special edition being a send-off to the sports car that always does well in the last model year of a particular generation. The Tesla Model S collects yet another award for delivering a welcome and overdue shock to the electric-car game and is the only sedan to make the list, and the Subaru BRZ also adds to its trophy chest, the lightweight coupe doing so much with so little that it might be worth a packet after Father Time has waved his staff a few times.

You can check out the rest of Hagerty's picks in the press release below.
Show full PR text
HAGERTY ANNOUNCES ITS ANNUAL 'HOT LIST' OF FUTURE COLLECTOR CARS
The World Leader in Classic Car Insurance Predicts the Ten Most Collectible 2013 Model Year Cars of Tomorrow


TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (January 29, 2013) – The launch of a new vehicle always causes excitement and debate among car enthusiasts, and the models debuting at the recent North American International Auto Show were no exception. While automakers raved about the latest technology and performance statistics, the vehicles' long-term desirability among future collectors was rarely mentioned.

Always in search of future collectibles, Hagerty has unveiled its annual "Hagerty Hot List" of cars that speak to driving enthusiasts. Chosen by its team of experts, the selections are made up of mass-produced vehicles available for sale as a 2013 model with an MSRP of less than $100,000. Special consideration was given to newly launched versions not appearing on previous Hagerty Hot Lists that will likely become collectible in the next 20 years.

"This year's Hot List is comprised of vehicles from a wide variety of market segments and manufacturers, but they all share one thing in common – a certain 'cool' factor that will be remembered by car enthusiasts for many years to come," says McKeel Hagerty, President and CEO of Hagerty. "Well-preserved examples will be sought-after well beyond their contemporary peers have been used up and recycled."

The 2013 Hagerty Hot List (along with base price):
  • SRT Viper ($97,395) – The redesigned coupe has more power than ever with its 8.4 liter V10 engine, 640 horsepower and absurd 600 lb-ft of torque – "the most torque of any naturally aspirated engine currently produced," according to Chrysler. We applaud the Viper as one of the last living examples of the once-celebrated mantra of "there is no replacement for displacement."
  • Chevrolet Corvette Convertible 427 ($75,925) – 2013 marks the 60th anniversary of the Corvette and Chevrolet is celebrating with its "fastest and most capable Corvette convertible yet." Nothing screams "American Muscle" like a 505 horsepower beast that will do zero-to-60 in 3.8 seconds, coming from a good old fashioned pushrod V8 engine. Corvette values tend to favor the last model year of each generation making the 60th anniversary year a worthy example to keep in your garage.
  • Audi RS5 ($68,900) – It's purely subjective, but we think the basic Audi A5 is one of the handsomest coupes on the market. It just oozes good taste in the way that big BMW coupes like the 3.0CS and 635 CSi used to. Add to that a potent 414 horsepower, 4.2 liter V8 and you've got the makings of a truly great coupe.
  • Porsche Cayman S ($63,800) – For Porsche purists, the introduction of the Cayenne Diesel (2013 SUV) was a departure from everything Porsche felt the brand stood for. The Cayman S is Porsche's atonement for the sin of the diesel Cayenne. This version is more powerful, more efficient and lighter than previous versions of the Cayman. Say hello to the 911's little brother.
  • Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 Convertible ($59,545) – Make no mistake, we are living in a modern day horsepower race led by American pony cars. Priced near the top of its segment and equipped with a 580 horsepower supercharged V-8, Chevrolet's "most powerful production convertible ever" will likely be limited to hardcore enthusiasts and command a premium when they surface years down the road.
  • Tesla Model S ($58,570) – Electric cars themselves are nearly as old as the light bulb. The Model S defies the stereotype that electric cars are just for people trying to kick the petroleum habit. A nearly-silent zero-to-60 time of five seconds gives new definition to a "sleeper" car.
  • Mini John Cooper Works GP ($39,950) – With a top speed of 150 mph, the John Cooper Works GP is being hailed as "the fastest Mini ever built," according to the company. The turbocharged engine boasts 211 horsepower and will reportedly hit 60 mph in only 5.9 seconds. Mini enthusiasts will need to secure theirs quickly as merely 500 units will be sold in the United States.
  • Subaru BRZ ($25,495) – One of the lightest sport coupes in the current market, the Subaru BRZ's precision handling sets it apart from the crowd. Often thought of as a 'quirky' carmaker specializing exclusively in all-wheel drive models, the rear-wheel drive BRZ injects some tire-smoking adrenaline into the Subaru brand. Its twin is the equally impressive Scion FR-S.
  • Volkswagen GTi ($23,995) – If sales hadn't flourished so much over the years, we would describe the GTi as having a cult-like following. The most successful compact sports car in the world has come a long way since the debut of the first Golf GTi in 1976...and the 2013 version may be the best yet. Fun, cool and practical for less than $25K. Ja, Bitte!
  • Ford Focus ST ($23,700) – Ford used to save its best small cars for the European market. Thankfully, those days are over. We believe this four-door hatch with over 250 horsepower and performance handling is an undeniable bargain under $25K that will attract collectors many years down the road.
Hagerty is the world's leading insurance agency for classic vehicles and host to the largest network of classic car owners. Hagerty offers insurance for classic cars, motorcycles and motorcycle safety equipment, tractors, automotive tools and spare parts, and even "automobilia" (any historic or collectible item linked with motor vehicles). Hagerty also offers overseas shipping/touring insurance coverage, commercial coverage and club liability coverage. For more information, call (800) 922-4050 or visit www.hagerty.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 67 Comments
      Chris
      • 1 Year Ago
      Are we talking about classics or collectibles here? I consider the two to be different. The way I see it, anything can be widely regarded as a classic one day, while in order for something to be a collectible, it has to be something a little more exclusive. A 1969 Chevrolet Chevelle SS is a classic while a 1987 Buick Grand National GNX is a collectible. Chevelles, like Mustangs and Camaros, were a dime a dozen in their day, and still are at car shows. With the 1987 GNX, whatever remains of the 1, 542 that were ever made are quite sought after by collectors and enthusiasts.
      wrxfrk16
      • 1 Year Ago
      While there are plenty of factors in what makes a collectible car, it does seem there is one major factor in the (relatively) newer vehicles appreciating in value. They are all the cars kids wanted but couldn't afford, or had and wrecked in their teens. Once they have the money to actually own them, they go back and pay insane markups to have the clean, unmolested or restored examples. In that sense, it'll be RX-7's and Supra's, STi's and Evo's. The new Boss Mustang, the higher end Vette's, the Viper. The M3, RX-8's, S2000's, 350 and 370Z's, etc. The current 911's, perhaps the Boxster Spyder. Sadly, even some of our gaudiest SUV's will likely be collectible. Some people will probably look back and pine for an Escalade, H2, Navigator, or Excursion years down the road...
        Chris
        • 1 Year Ago
        @wrxfrk16
        Good points!! I didn't even think of the SUVs. I can see those becoming one of those weird cases where people are wanting the vehicles that their parents drove. After all, these weren't just the vehicles that their parents took them to camp, soccer practice and the mall in, they were also the vehicles their favorite rap artists and pro athletes tooled around in as well. Unlike the mundane family sedans, station wagons, and minivans that preceded them, SUVs actually had a sort of cool, pop culture appeal about them. I can totally see some guy, 20 years from now, out cruising in his mint 97' Suburban, listening to some Nelly, Eminem, and Kid Rock while telling his kid how all about the early 2000s, and how none of the current tv shows even hold a candle to "The Sopranos" and "South Park", and where he was on 9/11 etc.
      Brian Rautio
      • 1 Year Ago
      "I can't believe the new SRT viper is going to be a classic one day!" -No one, ever.
        Bud
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Brian Rautio
        Never will be....didn't stretch far enough in any way.....and if fact never will under corporate guidance. It needs to reviewed and evaluated by an outside house....
      Ben Lee
      • 1 Year Ago
      the "new" Viper is just a trace of the old one. Yawn. whats with the black mask thing around the rear lights? The old rear looked better and I thought the Corvette rear was bad
        Bud
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ben Lee
        Ben....The Chrysler SRT folks are onto your posts....marking them down...lol
      Sir Duke
      • 1 Year Ago
      The only car I disagree with here is the Focus ST. In a vacuum the ST a fine car, but as a car guy who knows that the RS exists, just not here in America, I consider the ST a lukewarm effort that leaves a lot to be desired.
      MTU 5.0
      • 1 Year Ago
      That really is a beautiful Viper. I would choose that, in that exact color combo, over a C7.
        Bud
        • 1 Year Ago
        @MTU 5.0
        It was a classic 15 years ago.....and it is still the same now, so why would it be a classic now when it is essentially the same as the previous classic ? I don't it....dumb!
      goatcars
      • 1 Year Ago
      This reminds me of when the Wall Street Journal predicted the 1978 Corvette Pace Car would be worth 100K in a few short years.....Chevrolet built 6,502 of them which were promptly purchased at full or over list price by eager greedy buyers .......Today a perfect 1978 Pace Car with ultra low miles might bring 22K.....a little more than the original purchase price 35 years ago !!!!!!!!!!!!!
        Chris
        • 1 Year Ago
        @goatcars
        Good point, however you must take into consideration that 1978 was in the midst of a pretty dark period in automotive history. It was a time when performance cars had fallen victim to skyrocketing gas prices and insurance premiums and ever more stringent federal and state government mandates. The ones that did survive, like the Corvette, were mere shadows of their former selves. By contrast, the old muscle cars from the 60s represented a relatively care free time when it seemed as though the sky was the limit. 1970 is when the muscle car era reached its peak, 1972 is when it all of that started to come crashing down, and 1973 was the final nail in the coffin. It wasn't until the mid 80s that performance started to become respectable again. The only car that I can think of that seemed to escape the "Automotive Malaise Era" stigma is the 1977-1981 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, and I suspect that had more to do with Burt Reynolds and the 'Smokey and the Bandit' movies than its performance capabilities. Today, we are living in some pretty good times to be an automotive enthusiast. Much like the 60s, cars are faster, and better in almost every conceivable way, and there seems to be no end in sight. Now, do I think the cars from this era will be as sought after as the ones from the 60s and early 70s are today? I would like to say yes, but my gut tells me no. However, I don't think we will be looking back at this era as some depressing era like the 70s.
      Andyz
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think future collectables will also include anything odd, quirky or low volume, just look at what crosses the block these days. So you will Jaguar XK8, Mini, maybe Fiat 500, Golf GTi, CTS-v, and anything that is convertible. Looking at current engine trend anything with a huge V8 will become a curiosity and for some the reason the buy/restore or invest. Collectable does not mean necessarily a good car.
      hollowalls
      • 1 Year Ago
      Cayman? You have got to be kiding.
      iquniverse
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wake up grasshoppers ! These so called experts and auction houses selling classics and so called collectibles are taking all of you for a ride. Having built 32 cars including "America's Most Beautiful Roadster" and Ridller engineering award winners including special effects for James Bond Aston Martins and Dukes of Hazard stunt cars, here is a wake up call. The most revered Corvette of all time might well be the 1967 427 convertible. This has to be one of the worst cars ever built ! The Model A Fords had crossed leaf springs and so did the Corvette 50 years later. Front engine heavy, handling was lethal and made from thick fiberglass they were heavier than a Camaro. Nothing on the car worked for very long. The ignition/electrical controls were mounted above the front tire where water soaked them. You could crank the engine or activate the left turn signal but not both at the same time. The car cost $7500 new and we tried for a year to dump one for $2500 > no takers. And yet they sell today at auction to the uninformed with more money than sense for upwards of $600,000.00 Then there is the current crop which are obvious copycats (VW's Viper Wannabees) of the new Vipers. Nuff sed !
      iquniverse
      • 1 Year Ago
      Another wake up call grasshoppers ! The new Corvette is one again a VW- A Viper Wannabee. Look at the front end of ten years of Corvette's and the previous year Vipers. Total copycats which extends to the current models. The Viper is a hand assembled automobile just like the Rolls Royce or Bentley. The Corvette is a mass produced "cookie cutter" off an assembly line. A new ZR-1 cost over $122,000.00 and looks just like the $50,000 model ! For far less than that you can get a new custom Venom Viper twin turbo with 1200 HP. that is a reliable every day driver. The over supercharged Corvette has limited torque and has proven totally unreliable (check the almost non-existent warranty) and is no match in any category for the Viper. And when is the last time you saw a Viper owner trading in his prize for a cookie cutter Corvette? Nuff Sed !
        Monkaroo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @iquniverse
        Hand assembled and ugly. People don\'t just buy horespower. They want design too. Chrysler could have gone in so many different ways to advance the design and tech of this car but chose to give us an updated 1993 Viper. I will give it to Ralph that it has a nicer interior than the vette but I would still take the vette over this Viper. BTW just because the headlights are similar doesn\'t mean a thing. I doubt the tech in this viper matches the new vette whether you like the Vette or not.
          iquniverse
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Monkaroo
          Monkaroo, Take it from someone who has owned many Corvettes and in desperation, several Vipers, they are two different cars in quality, workmanship, performance and there is absolutely no way to compare them since they are simply not in the same category and anyone who thinks so needs to spend some time in a Viper. I've had almost everything including Ferraris, Porches and Lambos in over forty years and the Viper is hands down, the best sports car and the most dependable. And if it is so ugly, why does GM continue to copy it ? Updated 1993 Viper ? You are kidding of course ! And of course the Corvette is not an updated earlier version of the Corvette ? ? ? Look at the front of the last ten years of Corvettes. They are almost exact copies of the previous year Vipers. And now the new one is a copy cat of the Viper grill, side and hood scoops. Even Corvette owners admit the new Corvette looks like a copy of the 2013 Viper and maybe thats why the bought it ? And don't ever get a ZR1 $122,000 over supercharged 500 HP Corvette near a Viper Venom twin turbo with 1200 HP unless you want to be embarrassed. Nobody and I mean nobody with a Viper is ever going to trade it in on a Corvette. Nuff Sed !
        Thipps
        • 1 Year Ago
        @iquniverse
        ok so tell me why a corvette zo6 holds its value better than a viper? or why the outgoing ZR1 is not only faster but the better handling car? And dont flatterer yourself with the idea that corvette is "coping" the vipers design, Its crystal clear that the C7 is a evolution of previous generations and its looks undeniably like a corvette. Corvette looks forward to meeting Viper in the 24 hours of La Mans
          iquniverse
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Thipps
          Thipps, Maybe I misunderstood. So let me get this straight. I've owned multiple Corvettes and even when less than a year old, couldn't give them away starting with the 1967 model. And you're comparing a Z06 Corvette to a 1200 HP Venom Viper. Really ! A car that held the track record at Nurburing and also won LeMans, Sebring, and almost every race it entered, blowing away (non stock) Corvettes, Ferraris, Porche, Lambo's etc. ! I sure wouldn't want to "flatter myself" so just send me some of what you are smoking ?
        Bernard
        • 1 Year Ago
        @iquniverse
        The Viper stole from the C6, the C7 borrowed from it's past. That's why the Viper looks similar. Regardless, anyone with decent eyesight can tell the difference from a football field away. I suggest you have your cataracts fixed...
      Bloomsbury
      • 1 Year Ago
      What a load of garbage. Can't believe you got conned into promoting this company off such a weak press release.
        Andre Neves
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Bloomsbury
        Between this and the multiple articles about the Super Bowl ads, it's a slow news day at AB.
          chirowolf
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Andre Neves
          just a word of advice. Never \"say slow neeews day\" in a post on Gawker media sites like Jolopnik. It will get you banned for life. No kiding back a couple years ago when the NewYork area had thier super small earth quake all Gawker would post is thinkgs about the \"earthquake\". Just stupid. so I posted the fatefull \"slow neeeeews day\" adn was banned for life. Have never been back to a Gawker site since
          Bud
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Andre Neves
          @Chiro....any site that applies censorship like this should not be encouraged to be visited. Thanks I will avoid...
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