• Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
  • Image Credit: Formula E
What can we learn from Formula E's preseason testing data so far? Laps completed, lap times, and times broken down by sector lead Current E to a few conclusions for the 2016/17 season. Renault might have fiercer, closer competition this year. Buemi and di Grassi both look good, but Jean-Eric Vergne with his Donington Park record, plus Bird, Rosenqvist, and Lopez are all serious contenders. Evans and Carroll are likely picks for permanent Jaguar seats, and the new team could be reserving outright performance for efficiency. NextEV's prowess in the twisty bits could make them more competitive on certain circuits. Andretti, as a team, appears to be a bit behind where it should be, and should be interesting to watch during the second round of testing. Get the full breakdown of the data from Current E.

Cummins and Peterbilt are working together toward common goals in the DOE's Supertruck II program. In order to make Class 8 freight trucks more efficient in an affordable and commercially viable way, the Cummins–Peterbilt team will build upon their breakthroughs in Supertruck I, some of which are making their way onto roads for the 2017 model year. Compared to a 2009 baseline truck, Cummins intends to improve brake thermal efficiency by 55 percent at a 65 mph cruise. Both partners will work to reach a 100 percent improvement in freight-ton economy, which is a way to measure how heavy and how far freight is transported per unit of fuel. They are working with suppliers, laboratories, and universities to achieve this goal. Read more at Green Car Congress.

Tesla's fine for a breach in a non-disclosure agreement reveals a Korean supplier for the Model 3. While it's unclear exactly which supplier it targets, a Korea Herald report says that Tesla is fining a "major Seoul-based supplier" $1 million for the breach. Inside EVs points to Mando or Posco as the likely contract holder that leaked information in spite of the NDA. Mando supplies components for the Model S, but Tesla denies a relationship regarding the Model 3. Steelmaker Posco has denied previous reports of ties to the Model 3. The Korea Herald also says that other South Korean suppliers "received verbal warnings for revealing information to the media here about a possible deal." Read more from The Korea Herald, and from Inside EVs.

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