Despite previous reports, General Motors may not have sought the help of NASA in confirming that cars suffering from the ignition switch defect are safe to drive in certain conditions. The reports, which first began surfacing on Thursday, has been very widely circulated by a number of publications.

"NASA is not working with General Motors on its ignition switch issue," NASA's deputy associate administrator for communications, Bob Jacobs, told TheDetroitBureau.com. Seems pretty unequivocal, right? Not exactly.

According to TDB, an unnamed source claimed there are some unofficial "low-level" chats going on between the largest US automaker and the people that put men on the moon. And if the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration or another federal body approached NASA, it could very well get involved in the situation.

"Obviously, we would provide (assistance) as we have in the past," Jacobs told TDB, referring to the agency's assistance in the Toyota unintended acceleration issue.

As for GM actually requesting assistance, Jacobs says it wouldn't be as easy as just saying "yes," noting that NASA would need the permission of both NHTSA and the Justice Department.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 26 Comments
      jebibudala
      • 8 Months Ago
      Of course NASA wouldn't assist. They've been re-purposed to providing Muslim outreach programs.
        Jerry
        • 8 Months Ago
        @jebibudala
        Lol WTF are you smoking?
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Jerry
          [blocked]
          dzizwheel
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Jerry
          NASA being used for "Muslim outreach" were words right out of Obama's mouth and the sound bytes are there to prove it.
          jtav2002
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Jerry
          2010 wants it's news headline back.
      Famsert
      • 8 Months Ago
      In Toyota's situation, there was an electronic boogeyman that no one could find and no one ever did. In this case, GM used a 50 cent ignition switch instead of choosing something with a little more quality. We don't need NASA to work on that.
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Famsert
        [blocked]
          jtav2002
          • 8 Months Ago
          You're still missing the fact yonomo that Toyota was trying to eliminate the possibility that there was an electronic problem. They could have just said nope, just floor mats, user error, not our fault. There is a big difference in them genuinely not knowing what was wrong and needing assistance and GM selling a vehicle they KNEW had a specific default before the vehicle ever went on sale to the public. People can hate on Toyota all they want, that's fine, but these two situations are vastly different.
          Famsert
          • 8 Months Ago
          Except not a single case was linked to sticky pedals and ONE case was linked to stacked floor mats. NASA was used to find electronic boogeymen like I said, not to find out how to not stack floor mats.. They didn't find it.
          • 8 Months Ago
          [blocked]
          John
          • 8 Months Ago
          Famsert is correct. Neither of the investigations found any connection to faulty accelerator pedals. Perhaps more importantly, the one culprit they did find was improperly stacked floor mats, a problem which can affect any vehicle, no matter how well constructed.
      Renaurd
      • 8 Months Ago
      The temporary solution to this problem is, DO NOT HANG AN ANVIL FROM YOUR KEYCHAIN and it will be fine. My niece has a new Cruze, she had everything but a refrigerator hanging from a long chain with it swinging at every turn. Her dad made her remove everything but the keys. Keychains are for keys, not tennis balls or your boyfriends picture in a frame.
        Famsert
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Renaurd
        Actually there has been many reports of mere potholes turning cars off... with regular ol keychains. Read up on it before criticizing the owners.
        Chelcie Carmen Ratin
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Renaurd
        Exactly! Everyone is freaking out about this recall and the hype is relatively unnecessary. I work at a Chevy dealership in the service department, and the parts and recall bulletins were not even made available to us until Monday April 7th. Our dealership still does not have the parts available. We are also a brand new dealership with a very limited loaner car fleet available for dispersal. People have had expectations of us because the media told them that they were entitled to loaner vehicles until their cars were fixed. We simply don't have the resources to support this media hype. For anyone who owns a vehicle affected by this recall, simply take everything, including the key FOB off the key chain and the vehicle will be safe to drive.
      Doug
      • 8 Months Ago
      Unlike a certain other maker who ran to them to cover their flaw - TOYOTA!
        jtav2002
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Doug
        Which flaw was covered exactly? Why do you call GM hiding a problem they knew existed in their vehicle for over a decade. God you people are morons.
      PTC DAWG
      • 8 Months Ago
      One key. Nothing more..it is all I have ever done....
        jtav2002
        • 8 Months Ago
        @PTC DAWG
        I have 5 including the key to start my vehicle. All necessary keys. One shouldn't have to carry a separate key chain because it might damage their ignition.
        John
        • 8 Months Ago
        @PTC DAWG
        Honestly, over the years I have had cars that I could start without a key, pull the key out while driving, etc., etc. Maybe there is something I don't understand about the current situation, but I don't personally consider an ignition key sliding out to be a safety issue.
      autoworker2014
      • 8 Months Ago
      Why would GM seek the help of NASA? NASA is in bed with Toyota. That's why they didn't find anything wrong with Toyota's crappy death traps. NASA should have their engineers shot as traitors. How dare they lie for Toyota!
      Jerry
      • 8 Months Ago
      Uh what is there for NASA to do? It's a defective key switch. Do the GM published wiring diagrams indicate that the peer steering, brakes, and air bags shut off when the key is off? Yes? End of discussion.
      Gregg Alley
      • 8 Months Ago
      Perhaps I'm missing something, but why would GM contact a space agency for assistance?
        b.rn
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Gregg Alley
        For the same reasons Toyota did, which were...ummm...I've no idea.
      Pat
      • 8 Months Ago
      would it be so difficult to put the "run" position of the switch in the vertical position? or would this be too simple?
      Andrew Ramos
      • 8 Months Ago
      You don't own space. NASA does.
      William
      • 8 Months Ago
      NASA...LOL
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