56 Articles
Official

WASHINGTON(Reuters) - General Motors has agreed to pay $120 million to resolve claims from 49 U.S. states and the District of Columbia over faulty ignition switches, state attorneys general and the company said on Thursday. The largest U.S. automaker had previously paid about $2.5 billion in penalties and settlements over faulty ignition switches that could cause engines to stall and prevent airbags from deploying in crashes. The defect has been linked to 124 deaths and 275 injuries, and prompt

Report
Official

General Motors neither admitted nor denied any wrongdoing.

This fine is a drop in the bucket compared to the total costs of the ignition switch scandal.

Report

Federal appeals court reverses bankruptcy judge's decision.

The decision allows drivers injured before 2009's bankruptcy and owners who claim their cars lost value due to the ignition switch scandal to sue New GM.

Report

The plaintiff in the first federal trial for GM ignition switches dismissed the case and received no settlement from the automaker.

Followup

Proposed Law Would Allow Dealers To Share TSBs With Car Buyers

In the wake of the General Motors safety crisis, the mother of one ignition-switch victim is working with lawmakers to ensure motorists receive more information on vehicle defects from dealerships.

Report

A civil trial over defective ignition switches will begin January 11, and the case's outcome could decide if the automaker will fight other suits.

Report

General Motors paid out $594.5 million in its ignition switch claims resolution program, and on average the people with eligible cases got $1.5 million.

Report

A District Court Judge rules that attorney-client privilege protects certain documents between GM and law firm King & Spalding over the ignition switch defect.

Report

The bankruptcy judge deciding whether New GM is responsible for ignition switch cases from before 2009 is putting all of the suits on hold until the US Court of Appeals decides whether to uphold his ruling.

Official

The US Department of Transportation has decided to extend its regulatory supervision over General Motors for an additional year. The government agency believes that the oversight is a proactive way to address possible safety defects.

Followup

The attorneys at the GM Ignition Compensation Claims Resolution Facility are now reporting a total of 90 confirmed deaths and 163 injuries in their latest progress report.

Followup

In the latest release from the GM Ignition Compensation Claims Resolution Facility the number of deaths grows to 87 people, 3 more than the previous week, and injuries remain at 157.

Report

The GM Ignition Compensation Claims Resolution Facility continues its weekly release of deaths and injuries caused by the automaker's bad ignition switch. In the latest tally, it records 84 deaths and a total of 157 people harmed.

Report

In the latest tally released by the General Motors Ignition Compensation Claims Resolution Facility, the number of cases offered compensation for fatalities has risen to 74 people. There have also been 126 injuries linked to the automaker's faulty part.

Official

General Motors received 33 more claims to its ignition-switch claim facility this week, which pushed the total to 4,345. The number of accepted cases increased by eight, including one fatality and seven injuries.

Official

General Motors received 75 more claims from people about the automaker's faulty ignition switches. The number of eligible claims jumped up by 12, including four more for deaths and eight more for injuries.

Report

Michael Mikkikin, the general council for General Motors, announced his retirement from the automaker last year. However, he now might not leave until July, while the company searches for a successor.

Official

The General Motors ignition switch compensation fund received 57 more reports this week that were postmarked before the January 31 deadline. The number of accepted claims ticked up slightly by one additional death and two more injuries.

Report

As the appeal process closes for General Motors' ignition switch recall compensation fund, the tally of claims stands at 4,180. That number might climb, though, because claims postmarked January 31 are still being accepted. As of the latest total, the attorneys found 51 deaths and 77 injures caused by the faulty parts.