Some background: one of the more scandalous international incidents of he-said/he-said from 2012 was when Swedish magazine Teknikens Varld put the Jeep Grand Cherokee through its "moose (or elk) test" and reported that the SUV nearly rolled over. That lead to a whole lot of accusations and rebuttals: more than one website and Chrysler's own blog reported that the Jeep was overloaded; Chrysler said Teknikens printed the magazine then let Chrysler respond, Teknikens answered all of the charges in a lengthy post and said Chrysler was given a chance to comment before it went to print; when Chrysler sent investigators to oversee the test and the Jeep didn't go up on two wheels as it did in the first test, furthermore all four wheels stayed on the ground when Auto Motor und Sport tested a Grand Cherokee in the same way.

Teknikens then re-ran the test with a new vehicle and said it's been doing this test since the 1970s, uses the loading information that Chrysler provides to the Swedish motor authority and the previous Grand Cherokee passed with no problem. In the second test, the Jeep failed again, then it gave Chrysler engineers access to the car's electronics and ran the test again. In that second round the Grand Cherokee didn't repeat the lurid two-wheel action, but in eleven runs it blew out front left tire seven times. Chrysler still objects to the results of all of those tests and maintains that vehicle was safe.

The 2014 Grand Cherokee was given its shot at the gauntlet in the latest round of moose tests, and Teknikens Varld reports that it passed without any problem at all, its stability control working perfectly, controlling motion at low speeds and all the way up to 44.1 miles per hour. You can watch the video of the new test and read the press release from the magazine on the updated Grand Cherokee below.


Show full PR text
This is how the new Jeep Grand Cherokee 2014 handles the moose test

Perhaps you remember Jeep Grand Cherokee in Teknikens Värld's moose test summer 2012? The car went up on two wheels and was about to roll over. The dangerous behavior in the avoidance maneuver quickly became world news. Now we take the new Grand Cherokee, model year 2014, to the moose test track to see if it is better than its predecessor.

In summer 2012 the previous generation of the Jeep Grand Cherokee went up on two wheels in Teknikens Värld's famous moose test. Already at low speed, 61 km/h (37.9 mph), the wheels on the inside left the ground and at 63.5 km/h (39.5 mph), the car was about to roll over. Neither did the electronic stability system or the anti-rollover system respond – very strange.

We repeated the tests, with different drivers and different Jeep Grand Cherokees, but the result was always the same. Except when Jeep's American engineerers had been given access to the cars and the tests were run on their premises – then the result instead became seven front wheel punctures.

You can read all about the moose test behaviour of the Grand Cherokee in 2012 at teknikensvarld.se, where you also find the film that has been seen by over 2.5 million people worldwide.

In Teknikens Värld issue 2/2014 we test the newly updated Jeep Grand Cherokee 3.0 CRD model year 2014, where it is compared against the new BMW X5 and Range Rover Sport. With summer tires mounted and the cars loaded according to their Swedish certificate of registration, in the case of Jeep Grand Cherokee a total weight of 2 949 kg (6 501 lbs), passengers and luggage included, we go for the test track.

We are delighted to point out that our test results from 2012 have led to a comprehensive development work by the Jeep engineerers, the old behavior is completely gone. The main difference is that the traction control system begins to work really early and it slows down the speed of the car dramatically, even at such low entry speed as 61 km/h (37.9 mph). When we increase the speed the system actually works even more, making the behavior of the car just as safely as it would have been that early summer day in 2012.

At 71 km/h (44.1 mph) the car reaches its limit, the car cannot master more than that. But it is a good result for a SUV vehicle, no doubt about that. It is also a clear sign that Jeep understood the seriousness of the previous generation's severe flaws and did something to it.

Read the full story and watch the film at: http://www.teknikensvarld.se/jeepmoosetest-2014/


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  • 26 Comments
      RobbieAG
      • 11 Months Ago
      Somebody made a quick programming change...
        Patrick
        • 11 Months Ago
        @RobbieAG
        Yeah, it appears the system allowed for too much yawing before. I wonder if they also upgraded the tires to a higher max load or increased the minimum tire pressure, because the left front was being overwhelmed.
      Bill Burke
      • 11 Months Ago
      I believe the original tests were rigged or flawed to cook up the results. This new closely watched test proves, again, that the Jeep Grand Cherokee deserves it's consensus recognition as the best SUV on the planet. Millions of satisfied customers agree, just check the sales for 2013-2014.
        omgcool
        • 11 Months Ago
        @Bill Burke
        Bill, even as a fellow person preferential to Chrysler vehicles, I have to point out that sales do not always correspond to superiority. Plenty of sub-par vehicles sell better than their superior counterparts. Classic example: the Camry is the best selling midsize sedan in the US. Is it the overall "best?" Not at all. Public perception is the most powerful tool. That said, I personally agree that the GC & Durango are currently the best-overall SUVs on the market.
        icerabbit
        • 11 Months Ago
        @Bill Burke
        Sales <> Safety Plenty of satisfied customers don't know the inherent safe or unsafe aspects of their vehicles. One such an example is a pickup truck sold by the millions in the US, which fails certain crash tests miserably. Doesn't mean its drivers aren't happy. The sales of the revamped JGC are indeed good, but that doesn't mean there could not have been an electronic or build issue. Tires blowing might have something to do with the fitted rims and tires. Anyhow. If previous versions of the JGC and same year versions of its brother/sister ML had no issues, then clearly something was up. And, I would never call it a "rigged" test when a vehicle fails. Whether performed by a government, insurance or private organisation. Tests are there to find issues and weak points. Sadly for Jeep, they found one in an emergency scenario ... which two years later they seem to have fixed. Combination of different rims? tires? pressure? shocks? software? ...
        Bill Burke
        • 11 Months Ago
        @Bill Burke
        Advice received with appreciation. I'd go with defective mounting as opposed to an inherent defect. I still think the original tests were, perhaps not deliberately, flawed.
      carnut0913
      • 11 Months Ago
      My 2011 passed the similar 'a-hole' test, dodging a guy racing through traffic at 85+mph. Went to change lanes at 55-60 and some guy came across 2 or 3 lanes of traffic for a last second attempt to exit. Quick swerve back and adjust and the jeep stayed upright with 5 people intact. Bring on the moose.
      bleexeo
      • 11 Months Ago
      How the heck could any car maker fail this simple test in 2012? Embarrassing.
        omgcool
        • 11 Months Ago
        @bleexeo
        The Grand Cherokee never failed within the functional capacities of the vehicle. Controversial stories like that, whether true or not, are simply how ratings are accrued. I bet you hadn't heard of Teknikens Varld before this story. I bet you have now. I also bet that is no coincidence.
      KAG
      • 11 Months Ago
      All those SUV's are so top heavy that without computer controlled stability controls taking over in emergency turns they would flip over. So imagine that same test in Ice, be afraid.
      m_2012
      • 11 Months Ago
      All the way up to 44MPH. Wow, I'm impressed. Takes a lot of stability control and electronics at those high speeds. /s off
      S40Powered
      • 11 Months Ago
      Fantastic SUV.
      nd4spdsrt
      • 11 Months Ago
      ...The original 'test' in which the car failed was cooked. That was proven by both REPUTABLE journalists and chryco itself. Think about it; a journalist nobody has ever heard of suddenly pops up with a hot story about how one of the best selling suvs fails the moose test, but nobody else can duplicate their results?..
        aaab.baaa
        • 11 Months Ago
        @nd4spdsrt
        Remember, Jeep's OWN GUYS could not make the car behave safely, neither probe the test was "cooked": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaYFLb8WMGM Good that Jeep improved that
      AE86
      • 11 Months Ago
      Epic fix
      dmg
      • 11 Months Ago
      Sweden has strict safety requirements.. they should be heeded. And it looks like it paid off. Good for everybody
        Slizzo
        • 11 Months Ago
        @dmg
        The "tests" were done by an independent magazine, and was not sanctioned by the Swedish government. There really wasn't a problem in the first case, just a magazine trying to shore up it's readership by publishing a sensationalist "review".
          clquake
          • 11 Months Ago
          @Slizzo
          By failing a GC, but passing hundreds of other cars?
      Schuckert
      • 11 Months Ago
      You should know that the tarmac on swedish roads are VERY coarse which increases the grip a lot.
      groingo
      • 11 Months Ago
      Well done guys!
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