Audi drivers, listen up. If you bought or leased a 2002-06 model-year A4 or A6 with a factory-installed Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) that failed, you may be entitled to reimbursement under a recently settled class-action lawsuit with corporate parent Volkswagen.

According to Automotive News, the settlement covers about 64,000 vehicles and alleges that "manufacturing and design problems caused the transmissions to fail and left owners stuck with repair costs." While the suit also argues Audi was aware of these issues (going so far as to hide that knowledge from consumers), the settlement stops short of acknowledging any wrongdoing by the German automaker.

Audi drivers are eligible for a cash reimbursement if their CVT repairs occurred within 10 years or 100,000 miles of the date they bought or leased the vehicle before June 19, 2013. To be eligible for compensation, drivers must submit a claim form (found here) with supporting documents by November 18.

Drivers who fail to meet the cash criteria may still be eligible for free repairs or replacements of their CVT, or a trade-in reimbursement for lost value. However, the settlement excludes those claiming personal injury or property damage.


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  • 36 Comments
      Shiftright
      • 1 Year Ago
      Also, scary to drive due to its inconsistent and often glacial response to the accelerator pedal, like when you're trying to get out of the way of an oncoming semi. Nearly soiled my shorts in a borrowed A4 Cabrio CVT.
      alex_leiva
      • 1 Year Ago
      Keeping the 5 speed as long as possible.
      BG
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wow, some.one would gamble on early-vintage CVT transmission? Let someone else be the guinea pig. Clearly, the manual trans. would have been the intelligent choice.
      knightrider_6
      • 1 Year Ago
      "Audi drivers are eligible for a cash reimbursement if their CVT repairs occurred within 10 years or 100,000 miles" Whoa! That's like three times the average life span of an Audi.
        Rick
        • 1 Year Ago
        @knightrider_6
        Wow, an ignorant Audi hater. My 2006 A4 w/CVT has 96k miles on it. So that's 3x times your wit.
          Eric
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rick
          Hopefully you got that timing belt changed at 75k or it's not going to last much longer
          The Wasp
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rick
          @Rick -- I bet you're hoping that CVT gives out pretty soon. Any idea how much it'll cost after the compensation period passes?
          FIDTRO
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rick
          More like 6x times lol.
      GR
      • 1 Year Ago
      Audi down. Nissan next? CVTs really seem like transmissions for the corporation's sake, not the consumer.
        Seal Rchin
        • 1 Year Ago
        @GR
        Oh LOOOOOOORRRRD. I drove many cars with CVTs they feel exactly the same as any car with any automatic tranny, just stop this already. JUST STOP
          GR
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Seal Rchin
          I wasn't necessarily talking about the driving dynamics (although I have heard more of the opposite from CVT owners than what you are claiming. In fact, off-the-line sluggishness and having to get used to it are COMMON complaints). CVTs apparently have reliability issues as this article highlights. The same issues are well known with JATCO CVTs found in Nissans. If two entirely different brands using different CVTs are experiencing similar problems, could it possibly be the design of the CVT? Also, it's no secret that performance-minded brands avoid CVTs like the plague. Why do you think Mazda's SkyActiv autos are not CVT? They don't want their cars to drive like Sentras and Altimas. Obviously, CVTs don't drive just like any automatic transmission. People and some companies go out of their way to avoid them. The main reason CVTs are getting popular is because they inflate corporate MPG figures for CAFE standards. They are more efficient than conventional automatics so this looks good for the company despite there are setbacks to performance and reliability. Meanwhile, newer conventional automatics with more gears are offering better driving dynamics while being just as efficient.
        Cruising
        • 1 Year Ago
        @GR
        Well I would not discount CVT's just yet, their new Jacto CVT7 units now feature a auxiliary gearbox so you have both a conventional CVT and a gearbox. They are using this new design in their smaller FWD cars. Since it just came out it will be hard to say about reliability but it seems like it will improve reliability greatly having a auxiliary gearbox in there taking some of the stress off the conventional CVT so it's not always in use. There is almost 30% friction reduction with the new CVT7 design according to Jacto.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Cruising
          [blocked]
        • 1 Year Ago
        @GR
        [blocked]
        carlotta
        • 1 Year Ago
        @GR
        Ford's CVT's were among the worst, did buyers get cash for that debacle? Ecoboosts next up.
      knightrider_6
      • 1 Year Ago
      "Audi was aware of these issues (going so far as to hide that knowledge from consumers)" That's how Audi got it's new slogan: Audi. Truth in Engineering
        lazybeans
        • 1 Year Ago
        @knightrider_6
        I noticed how Audi/VW don't have many recalls compared to other manufacturers. And this isn't because their cars are well engineered for durability. In fact, it's the opposite. I've had many unexpectedly failed coilpacks on my Audi and a host of other problems the 6 years I had it. They fight tooth and nail not to fix your car for free.
        Seal Rchin
        • 1 Year Ago
        @knightrider_6
        Fix It Again Adolph.
        FIDTRO
        • 1 Year Ago
        @knightrider_6
        Hyundai/Kia would know about lying to consumers, right?
      Dss10
      • 1 Year Ago
      Another reason to insist on the third pedal when you buy a car...
        BG
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dss10
        The obvious intelligent choice for most internal combustion-powered cars (note, exclude hybrids and electrics here).
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dss10
        [blocked]
          • 1 Year Ago
          [blocked]
      mbukukanyau
      • 1 Year Ago
      would not mind owning a new Audi, but an old one is the last thing I'd want, unless its the classic 1980's quattro coupe
      ferps
      • 1 Year Ago
      Down with CVTs! Everything about them is terrible. I'll never understand why the company that pioneered the use of twin clutch gearboxes continued to use these awful things.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ferps
        [blocked]
      Teleny411
      • 1 Year Ago
      I can guarantee that I will never buy a CVT equipped car.
      Andi
      • 1 Year Ago
      do anyone no if i can still to get my transmission fix
      foxtrot685
      • 1 Year Ago
      Its important to note whats going on that caused these, and many other CVT's to fail. The problem is the secondary solenoid and valve assembly. This is the part of the transmission that allows the input pulley to release clamping force once the car is accelerating from a stop. Once this part fails, it sends the CVT into a limp mode. The CVT can have as much as 1,000 PSI in the various lines and pumps at a given time, so early vintage CVT's had WAY too much pressure on this solenoid causing them to fail. The CVT components themselves, as far as the belt, the pulleys, and the stepper motors rarely fail, its that solenoid assembly that usually takes a dump and destroys torque converters in the process.
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