• Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
Just as there continues to be a horsepower war in the realm of performance cars, there's an ongoing battle over driving range among electric vehicles. Both the Tesla Model 3 and Chevrolet Bolt are promising around 200 miles for a relatively affordable price in or around 2017. Plus, Nissan is reportedly nearing a 250-mile Leaf for about the same time and Ford might be joining the game, too. Volkswagen might be the latest potential challenger with some extra distance possible from its future EVs.

According to Hybrid Cars, Volkswagen Chairman Martin Winterkorn tells Bild in Germany that the company is developing a new generation of battery tech with major gains, and it could reportedly provide a range of around 186 miles. That's more than double the current 83-mile EPA certified range for the e-Golf but falls short of the projections from competitors. Winterkorn didn't indicate exactly when this innovation would be ready for production, though.

Especially in recent months, the German automaker is making serious moves towards big advancements in battery tech, and the company's platforms are largely already prepped to become EVs. The entire VW Group is reportedly considering moving to a single, unified lithium-ion cell design, and that switch could cut component costs by as much as 66 percent. In late 2014, the German automotive giant also bought five percent of the US-based startup QuantumScape. That business has claimed a staggering 430-mile range from its fireproof, solid-state lithium batteries, but the proof will need to be seen on the road – and in whatever the competition is able to accomplish whenever a car is finally available.

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