When Nick Murray took delivery of his 2013 Porsche 911 Carrera S in June 2013, he had saved for it for the past five years. He didn't just pluck a random 911 off a dealer lot. He specially ordered his car with thousands of dollars in extras tailored just to him, and he captured all of the options on his YouTube channel. The love affair didn't last long. Eventually the channel became a place for Nick to air his growing list of grievances about his deteriorating 911. Eventually, his mix of righteous indignation and sarcasm went viral.

Nick Murray Porsche 911By late December, he had already had four warranty repairs done on the car. Things got much worse in March. The computers began resetting whenever Nick drove over large bumps. There was also an acrid, electrical smell that occasionally permeated the cabin. Murray filed for Lemon Law protection. ‚ÄčPorsche Cars North America contacted him for the first time to fix the problem, but it didn't help.

Things culminated in April when Murray put up a new video that showed more troubles. He began arbitration with Porsche and asked for either his full purchase price back or an exact replacement. The company countered with a portion of what the car was worth, based on its mileage. Murray refused and turned to his YouTube watchers for help. He asked them to spread the word, and the video went viral with over 800,000 views as of this writing. Supporters posted it multiple times on Porsche's Facebook and Twitter sites.

The pressure may have worked. Murray posted on the 6 Speed Online forums: "Good news! I have been contacted by PCNA to settle this. This whole mess will end today hopefully. Good that they are doing the right thing. Good for them." Later, he added another note on the forum and Facebook that the situation was resolved without going into detail.

Nick Twork, Product Communications Manager Porsche Cars North America, told Autoblog the that company was "very aware of these videos." He confirmed that the Customer Care Department had been in contact with Murray, and it met "with him one-on-one." He promised that PCNA would work with him until "everyone is satisfied."

Scroll down to watch the last three videos starting from the most recent to see what he went through. Warning, there is some occasional salty language.






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  • 148 Comments
      The Tourmaster
      • 8 Months Ago
      This is *very embarrassing* for Porsche. I applaud Nick Murray for his patience, restraint, and professionalism.
      Matt
      • 8 Months Ago
      For the cost of the lawyers, the lost sales due to these videos, and all the warranty repairs, Porsche could have given this guy 100+ replacement cars. When will businesses learn that doing the right thing, right away is ALWAYS the most profitable option?
        GVIrish
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Matt
        You're absolutely right, especially when you're talking about big ticket purchases like cars. Part of the reason people buy Porsches over other sports cars is because of their reputation for reliability, especially with the 911. If the perception becomes that Porsches are not more reliable than other sports cars that is going to cost Porsche a lot more in sales than the replacement cost of giving this guy a new car. A damaged reputation for reliability will also negatively affect resale value which will in turn raise lease rates. PCNA should've been especially motivated to help this guy out in light of the embarassing GT3 engine failures.
      swissfreek
      • 8 Months Ago
      Squeaky wheel gets the oil? It's cool that Porsche did right by him but they only did it after they felt he severely embarrassed them (and decided he might be costing them sales). Not what I would call customer service, just self preservation and damage control. I hope we don't get to a point in this world where the only way to get a problem fixed is to make a video clever enough to get 800,000 people to watch it and complain on Facebook.
        ashwats
        • 8 Months Ago
        @swissfreek
        Absolutely, that is not customer service!
      jonnybimmer
      • 8 Months Ago
      I admire Murray's professionalism with in the videos. It's so easy to be overly dramatic, exaggerate and make broad generalizations. In these videos, he never claimed Porsche built shoddy cars or that the 911 was a poor car, only that his specific car is a lemon (because, well, it is). I don't blame him or anyone else who are vocal about their problems to YouTube or other social medias so long as they do so in an open and honest manner (*ahem* Megna vs Tesla). Shame Murray has had such a tough time with what's supposed to be a great car and I hope Porsche is done wasting money and time protecting their ego and just give the guy a new car/full refund. With both the GT3 recall and problems like this, Porsche had the opportunity to rise above the likes of Ferrari in terms of customer service but has failed miserably. Automakers, especially those with prestigious brands, need to realize CS is more important nowadays with social media than it has ever been before and cannot afford to ignore a problem like Porsche has.
      akitadog
      • 8 Months Ago
      Went through a somewhat similar issue with my 2005 Cooper S. Saved up enough for a down payment of half the price, ordered it exactly to my specs. It ended up giving me an ownership period filled with the same recurring issue as well as random other issues. The trouble started at about 6700 miles and it was back to the shop about every 2 to 3 weeks after that. Lemon-lawed it with an open-and-shut case, and took the money (mileage deducted to when the issue started, as opposed to when I finally turned it in), as I knew that even if a replacement was only half as bad, it would still be a nightmarish experience. Eventually replaced it with a new MkV GTI and it has been virtually bulletproof. I'm ready to move onto something else, but I'm kind of scared that the next car won't be as reliable (can you believe I just said that about a VW?).
      ksrcm
      • 8 Months Ago
      Horrible customer relations. But there is something else that sends chills up my spine. I don't have money for Porsche, but I do own a BMW I bought new. Last two times it went to dealership for other than oil change, it stayed there for 7 days each time. I don't know what happened, but I can't shake the feeling that today no car company/dealership has competent service department anymore. It all looks like plug it in, read what's on the screen, check approved procedure, start throwing parts at it and hope it will fix the problem. As much as it is true that there was no better time than now to be car enthusiast in terms of power, choices and features available, so it is true that there was no worse time to be owning expensive machinery that needs a good mechanic than today.
        superchan7
        • 8 Months Ago
        @ksrcm
        This is only one car, and every manufacturer has lemons. The vast majority of Porsches are relatively reliable (do not confuse that with "cheap to maintain"). I've heard way more Honda lemon stories, so it's at least somewhat related to the number of cars on the road, and Japanese brands are no exception.
        D E S I G N
        • 8 Months Ago
        @ksrcm
        I have worked in many dealerships through out my life with many different brands. I can safely say that each situation is individually based. I have seen happy customers and ones that were beyond upset. The fact of the matter is that customers expect dealerships to make miracles happen with their vehicles, forgetting that it is a machine, it will breakdown, diagnoses will be mistaken, wrong parts will be ordered etc. But, on that one or two occasion where everything goes perfect for the client, it will seem like it's the best dealership, brand, service in the whole world. Clients can not expect top notch service going in to the dealership, they need to understand that it's a give and take. The customers that were most understanding of a situation and the problem with their car, who listened to the diagnosis and proposed solutions, who treated the service people with respect, were often the ones who had a good experience as it was reciprocated to them. It is just like anything else in the service industry and the world in general, you are dealing with your own kind, humans. Doesn't matter what you drive, where you live, how much money you have or who you know and how you look. Treat other as you would treat yourself. What goes around comes around. I'm sure you've heard it all by now, act on it and it will follow you. Peace.
      Gorgenapper
      • 8 Months Ago
      How does a company like Porsche not realize what would happen in this age of digital media? If I was the guy in charge of all of this, I'd have given him a replacement after that long list of fixes. Anything to avoid the inevitable YouTube video.
      Armand
      • 8 Months Ago
      Good for the guy, but kind of shows the level of customer service at Porsche. It didn't have to come to this.
        skablaw
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Armand
        In fairness, this is largely a dealership issue. The Porsche dealer in my hometown was phenomenal to work with. I had a lot of problems with my car, and I lay that blame at the feet of the manufacturer, but the local guys who wrenched on it, brought me coffee and picked me up in Panamera loaners weren't at fault. The Lexus dealership here, however, is obnoxious and I'm simply blessed that my current car requires virtually no service because I can't stand talking to the heels that work there.
      Steve Landon
      • 8 Months Ago
      I hope when expensive problems like this crop up that companies don't just destroy the car when they take ownership but rather disassemble it meticulously because it is very possible that the cascade of issues resulted from a very small handful of initial causes, like perhaps the rubber seals keeping out water and corrosion were out of spec from the supplier and stuff like that.
        Eggmania
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Steve Landon
        at this point how can you trace every individual problem back to what was originally manufactured and what was done during repairs. the pool of water starting appearing only after the techs got their hands on it.
        superchan7
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Steve Landon
        My bet is a damaged central ECU. He exposed some worn wiring insulation; that may have been slowly cooking the ECU.
        Christopher Anderson
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Steve Landon
        There is a massive Mercedes-Benz building in Jacksonville, FL where I live, that houses a group dedicated to learning the cause of frequent warranty repairs and lemon cars (among other departments). I used to know a guy who worked there. I assume Porsche has a similar group.
      KingTito
      • 8 Months Ago
      I know what happened. He drives it in the rain! Porsche never anticipated that their customers would do such a tragic thing. They only anticipated gentle spritzes of water and wiping with a diaper.
      Oglesby Thomas
      • 8 Months Ago
      All brands have a lemmon from time to time. I'm a huge Porsche fan and absolutely hate what happened to this man, but in the End, he got whys he wanted and Porsche learned a lesson. It is what it is.
      Rr778
      • 8 Months Ago
      By and large quality is pretty standardized across the industry. Parts manufacturers and brand engineering across manufacturers leads to that outcome. Obviously machines fail and drivers should be aware that a car can break or stall or get a flat at any moment. Lemons will always be produced, hopefully manufacturers will be more responsible about helping those individuals , but no brands like admitting they sold a lemon. Anyone who has had a dealer tell him the reason her transmission failed is because of his cold air intake understands how warranties work. BUYER BEWARE!
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