Ford has partnered with St. Petersburg Polytechnic University for three years to research various kinds of connected vehicle communications. The university tie-up is part of its study of space robots, NASA systems created to enable space-to-Earth communication, and the university's own development of systems that enable communication between the International Space State and Earth.

The objective is for Ford to engineer layers of robust networks and redundancy systems that will allow your car to speak to other cars, to emergency vehicles, to infrastructure like traffic lights and buildings, and to the cloud. Benefits would come in just about every area of transit, from avoiding accidents, to getting medical workers to an accident more quickly, to improving the flow of traffic during rush hour.

Check out the press release below for details on what Ford wants to learn from the JUSTIN Humanoid and NASA Robonaut R2, and a video of technical leader Oleg Gusikhin discussing his interest in the project.



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Ford Studies Space Robots for Connected Vehicle Communications

• Ford begins three-year research project with St. Petersburg Polytechnic University in Russia to observe the communication models of robots in space, with potential for connected vehicle communications applications

• By studying communication between robots on the International Space Station and with Earth, the project aims to improve the reliability of connected vehicle communications and aid in the advancement of emergency vehicle communication methods

• Ford is analyzing the most robust and reliable global telematics networks to help reduce traffic accidents; ease congestion; and provide faster, more accurate EMS response through vehicle-to-cloud, vehicle-to-infrastructure, vehicle-to-vehicle and other communications


DEARBORN, Mich., Aug. 21, 2013 – Ford is studying communications between space robots and Earth to enhance future applications of the connected car communications protocol. The research furthers the company's commitment to industry leadership in the development of connected vehicle communications to help reduce traffic congestion and aid in the advancement of emergency vehicle communication methods.

Just one way Ford is making good on this commitment is through the launch of a three-year research partnership with the telematics department of St. Petersburg Polytechnic University in Russia in its association with that country's space industry. The goal of Ford's relationship with the university is to analyze space-based robotic communications systems for vehicle mesh networks to aid in mobility solutions.

The development of connected vehicle communications has the potential to reduce traffic accidents and ease congestion by enabling vehicles to communicate with each other, and to communicate with buildings, traffic lights, the cloud and other systems to deliver a message or detect and respond to imminent collision warnings.

"Ford has been committed to the research and development of connected vehicle communications for more than a decade," said Paul Mascarenas, chief technical officer and vice president, Ford research and innovation. "Our participation in this research can aid in the development of next-generation Ford driver-assist technologies. These technologies will globally benefit Ford customers, other road users and the environment."

Emergency situations
One promising development from Ford's research project with St. Petersburg Polytechnic University is the advancement in emergency vehicle communication methods. Ford is analyzing how emergency messages should be sent to ensure delivery if network failures were to occur, identifying the systems and methods that provide redundancy in case of primary delivery failure.

For example, if an accident were to cause vehicle-to-cloud communications (V2C) to be broken, a vehicle may still have access to a vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications network. An emergency signal message could potentially be sent through V2V to a vehicle nearby, and then between vehicles and infrastructures until it reached EMS.

"The research of fallback options and robust message networks is important," said Oleg Gusikhin, technical leader in systems analytics for Ford. "If one network is down, alternatives need to be identified and strengthened to reliably propagate messages between networks."

Space telematics
Telematics – the long-distance transmission of digital information – developed for use on space stations provide excellent potential for improving the reliability of future vehicle-to-cloud, vehicle-to-infrastructure, vehicle-to-vehicle and other forms of communication (V2X). The communications blend multiple networking technologies including dedicated short-range communication (DSRC), cellular LTE wireless broadband and mesh networking to ensure robust and reliable connectivity for optimum signal strength for critical messages.

Using the knowledge accrued from analyzing the space robots, Ford engineers could then develop an algorithm that is integrated into the V2X system resulting in a message that would route through the appropriate network depending on the level of its importance. An emergency message, for example, may be communicated through the faster mesh network, whereas an entertainment-related message would route through a vehicle-to-infrastructure application, an embedded device or a brought-in device network.

"We are analyzing the data to research which networks are the most robust and reliable for certain types of messages, as well as fallback options if networks were to fail in a particular scenario," said Oleg Gusikhin, technical leader in systems analytics for Ford. "In a crash, for example, a vehicle could have the option to communicate an emergency though a DSRC, LTE or a mesh network based on the type of signal, speed and robustness required to reach emergency responders as quickly as possible."

The specific space robots leveraged for Ford's telematics analysis include the JUSTIN Humanoid, EUROBOT Ground Prototype and NASA Robonaut R2.

Blueprint for Mobility
Findings from this work could potentially enhance Ford's wireless communication technologies and Blueprint for Mobility. Ford's Blueprint for Mobility details the company's vision on how to tackle the issues of mobility in an increasingly crowded and urbanized planet between now and 2025.

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About Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 177,000 employees and 65 plants worldwide, the company's automotive brands include Ford and Lincoln. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford and its products worldwide, please visit http://corporate.ford.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 2 Comments
      flychinook
      • 1 Year Ago
      This wouldn't be necessary if we could improve human-to-car communications (or brain-to-human communications, for that matter).
      btulliani
      • 1 Year Ago
      How's about human-to-human communication by looking at a driver and providing hand signals of common courtesy, using a turn signal, flashing your high beams.....oh, wait that doesn't sound right......what the hell you guys know what I mean!