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Disability Rights Activists say that Uber is 99.9% inaccessible to people with mobility disabilities.

A wheelchair-bound freelance journalist was left at the curb by a heartless Uber driver this month and he got it all on video.

CES

Over two million people rely on wheelchairs in the US alone.

Featured Video

This mobilization device from Matia Robotics helps paraplegics go from sitting to standing.

Autoblog Minute

The Ripchair 3.0 is the most accessible ultimate off-road wheelchair ever

Is this the most extreme wheelchair ever built?

Video

It may not be a two-wheeled, self-balancing car, but it's still pretty cool.

Motorsports

BMW is hitting the track with two very different kind of wheeled machines: an M4 GTS converted to safety-car duty for DTM, and a wheelchair for the US paralympics team.

Official

BraunAbility unveils the MXV, a wheelchair-accessible version of the Ford Explorer with a sliding door, a ramp, and removable seats.

Translogic

Translogic heads to Lincoln, NE, to check out the Rocket Mobility Tomahawk, an all-terrain tracked wheelchair that can help people with disabilities get out to explore the trails. We chat with Rocket Mobility President Brice Crawford, then go for a ride with Tomahawk user Alex McKiernan.

Video

That wild looking vehicle that you see above is called Der Ziesel. It's hardly the first wheelchair designed to go off road, but it has to be one of the coolest. This product of Austria is basically a tracked ATV that lets disabled people go anywhere, or it could just be a wild personal mobility device, if that's what you need.

ETC

Meet the Whill Type-A. The product of a small group of engineers who worked at Japanese electronics companies and automakers - they started off with a motorized add-on for conventional wheelchairs three years ago - it's not a wheelchair, but a four-wheel-drive personal mobility device focused on style and maneuverability.

Video

Can you imagine how uncomfortable it would be to drive a car without a suspension? Now, think about being stuck like that everyday. That is the situation for many people in wheelchairs. A company from Israel has come up with an ingenious solution that goes on sale later this year, though. The Softwheel combines a suspension and wheel into a single unit.

Remember the Kenguru electric car, the little city EV that was designed with wheelchair users in mind? It was supposed to be available by now, since deliveries were reportedly "imminent" in the middle of 2012. Unfortunately, things haven't worked out quite as they were supposed to, which means that the cars have not started being hand-assembled by Community Cars in Pflugerville, TX.

When we first introduced you to the Kenguru wheelchair-accessible EV in 2012, Community Cars founder and CEO Stacy Zoern was still seeking funding for her Texas-based startup. The company was struggling to meet demand due to a lack of capital to purchase inventory. "It's an interesting problem to have as a startup company," explained Zoern. "We can't meet the demand there is out there because we don't have enough money to buy the inventory to build the cars."

Report

The Kenguru electric car is unlike any other EV, if for no other reason than it doesn't have a seat. That's because the Kenguru is designed to be driven by people in wheelchairs, and they bring their seats with them. With the Kenguru, you roll up, open the one door (the back hatch), then roll on down the road.

When it comes to getting around in a wheelchair, options are limited. There are wheelchair-accessible vans, but over that past 10 years the costs to convert a vehicle to accommodate a driver and their chair has gone up to about $80,000. Wouldn't it be great if there was a less bulky, more stylish option for getting around town?

Video

The people behind the subway-friendly, all-electric Kenguru have experienced many of the ups and downs that other start-up EV companies are all too familiar with. In fact, when you first go to the Kenguru website, it doesn't ask if you want to buy a car, it says "Investors Wanted!"

Video

The people behind the subway-friendly, all-electric Kenguru have experienced many of the ups and downs that other start-up EV companies are all too familiar with. In fact, when you first go to the Kenguru website, it doesn't ask if you want to buy a car, it says "Investors Wanted!"

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