As General Motors gets ready to start 2015 Volt production Monday, Chevrolet is looking back at some of the numbers that got the car to where it is today. The headline number is that Volt owners have collectively put more than a half-billion electric miles on their cars. The unsurprising upshot is that, if you went out and bought a Volt, you're pretty keen on getting as many electric miles out of it as possible.

90 percent of all Volt trips are done purely on electric power.

The typical Volt driver goes 970 miles between fill-ups, GM says, and that means that 63 percent of all miles are done on battery power. General Motors executive director Larry Nitz gave AutoblogGreen a few more details on the usage habits of Volt drivers, including that 81 percent of commuting miles are electric. Two-thirds of US Volt drivers charge their vehicle 1.4 times a day, a clear indicator of drivers trying to maximize electric miles through opportunity charging. In fact, Nitz said, 90 percent of all Volt trips are done purely on electric power. GM also says that the Volt's official 35 miles of electric range is still doable for many owners who have had their car for more than 30 months.

Looking ahead, we know that one upgrade for the 2015 Volt will be 4G LTE connectivity that can turn the car, like others in the GM family, into a mobile wifi hotspot. We're of course much more interested in when GM is finally going to start production of the next-gen Volt, but GM officials would only tell us that they're very excited about the still-secret vehicle, promising we'll be learning more "soon." Nitz did confirm that today's Volt drivers are most interested in three things from the next-gen model: more range, a lower price and a fifth seat. He did not say whether or not GM will be able to deliver on those requests.
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Chevrolet Volt Owners Surpass Half a Billion Electric Miles
After 30 months of use, a sampling of Volts shows consistent all-electric range


2014-06-19

DETROIT – Since its launch in late 2010, Chevrolet Volt owners have accumulated more than half a billion all-electric miles.

Additionally, based on a General Motors' study of more than 300 Volts in service in California for more than 30 months, many owners are exceeding the EPA-rated label of 35 miles of EV range per full charge, with about 15 percent surpassing 40 miles of range.

"The fact that most of the folks who purchased the Volt at launch are still enjoying EV range performance on target with when they took delivery is testament to the attention to detail our team paid to delivering on our promise of most people driving all electrically most of the time," said Pam Fletcher, Chevrolet Volt executive chief engineer.

Volt owners are doing more than 63 percent of their overall driving in EV mode. While the driving range in EV mode can be greatly impacted by temperature, driving technique and terrain, the ease with which Volt drivers are avoiding gasoline use further shows the Volt's suitability for almost any lifestyle.

Volt owners who charge regularly typically drive more than 970 miles between fill-ups and visit the gas station less than once a month. The 2014 Volt provides owners with fuel economy of EPA estimated 98 MPGe (electric) and 35 city/40 highway on gasoline power, saving $1,450 in annual fuel costs with no change in daily driving habits.

In an independent study conducted between July and December 2013, Volt drivers who participated in the Department of Energy's EV Project managed by Idaho National Labs totaled 1,198,114 vehicle trips of which 974,692, or 81.4 percent, were completed without the gasoline-powered generator being used.

Since the Volt was launched in 2010, owners have helped to reduce gasoline consumption by more than 25 million gallons, the equivalent of no gasoline being used in Washington D.C. for 2½ months.

The Volt continues to attract new buyers to Chevrolet with 69 percent of Volt buyers new to GM. The Toyota Prius is the most frequently traded-in vehicle for a Volt.

General Motors traces its roots back to 1908. GM has 10 joint ventures, two wholly owned foreign enterprises and more than 58,000 employees in China. GM and its joint ventures offer the broadest lineup of vehicles and brands among automakers in China. Passenger cars and commercial vehicles are sold under the Baojun, Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Jiefang, Opel and Wuling brands. In 2013, GM sold nearly 3.2 million vehicles in China. More information on General Motors in China can be found at GM Media Online.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 120 Comments
      paulwesterberg
      • 6 Months Ago
      > 63 percent of all miles are done on battery That means volt drivers have gone 315million miles on electricity. Tesla vehicles have traveled 344million miles on electricity. Tesla FTW! http://insideevs.com/elon-musk-344-million-miles-serious-permanent-injury-death-tesla-model-s/
        scraejtp
        • 6 Months Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        No, the Volt has gone 500 million miles on electricity. 63% of total Volt miles are electric. So Volts have traveled almost 800 million total miles.
        Jim
        • 6 Months Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        Sure, but how about the stats for the $30k Tesla? Oh right, there isn't one. (crickets....)
      jebibudala
      • 6 Months Ago
      The title is misleading. It should exclude government fleet vehicles - which own like 99.999999% of the Volts out there. I know of 4 sitting in a parking garage owned by a local government agency collecting dust that haven't moved in nearly a year.
        Tweaker
        • 6 Months Ago
        @jebibudala
        So, in all your brilliance with the stats, you did not think about the fact that those 4 Volts supposedly sitting there collecting dust are also not collecting miles and as such, would not be represented in these numbers? You are too smart. By half.
        carney373
        • 6 Months Ago
        @jebibudala
        It's a long debunked myth that fleet buyers are significant, let alone a majority, of Volt buyers. If anything, when the Volt became a political lightning rod fleet buyers have shied away.
        Jim
        • 6 Months Ago
        @jebibudala
        When you invent a statistic and then use 8 significant figures in your number, you just look like a silly buffoon that has a lying problem.
      Tesla Fan
      • 6 Months Ago
      My dad barely makes it home on electric. Needs more EV range obviously.
        TopGun
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Tesla Fan
        Or a Volt. :)
          Naturenut99
          • 6 Months Ago
          @TopGun
          It reads like his dad has a Volt. "... barely makes it home on electric..." meaning it about to switch to gas, or would if he wasnt more careful with his range. I also say it needs more EV miles. Yes I am a Volt owner. Most of us consider the range extender to be there if needed/long distance. We prefer to not have to use it on a normal/daily basis. I bought it to be electric, not to use gas. There were only 2 options for me. The Volt and Model S. I could only afford the Volt (within reason). Would prefer a long range EV. But price is the current obstacle.
      johnnythemoney
      • 6 Months Ago
      I think the main point here is that 90% of all trips are done on electric power. So much for range anxiety.
        Jim
        • 6 Months Ago
        @johnnythemoney
        And 37% of the overall miles were driven in gas mode (despite the fact that 90% of trips were electric), which means that people are using this car for long road trips... which was the whole point of this car. Sounds like a success.
      Julio B
      • 6 Months Ago
      I remember when car owners bragged about horsepower! Anyone knows about other changes of the 2015 Volt. I am literally negotiating a 2014 now with several dealers.
      Avinash Machado
      • 6 Months Ago
      A great technological marvel from Detroit.
      raktmn
      • 6 Months Ago
      "Nitz did confirm that today's Volt drivers are most interested in three things from the next-gen model: more range, a lower price and a fifth seat. He did not say whether or not GM will be able to deliver on those requests." Well, if he's good at his job, he'd only bring up what he thinks GM can deliver. For example, if he thought GM could only deliver a lower price and a fifth seat, if he were really good at his job he would have said that the top two things Volt drivers wanted were a fifth seat and a lower price. If all he thought he could deliver was longer range, then he could have just said that the top demand from Volt owners was more range. Assuming he is good at his job, I'd read this to mean that they are at least hoping to deliver all three. The only question I have is whether they will deliver all 3 in one car, or if they will have two models. One cheaper, the other with more range. There has definitely been rumors of something like that.
      vt8919
      • 6 Months Ago
      'm not much of a GM fan but I have to ask: how many of the people begging for a fifth seat actually use it, and if they do use it, how often? I doubt anyone in the market for a car like the Volt desperately needed it other than a bragging right.
      Jim1961
      • 6 Months Ago
      If you like the Chevy Volt but you don't think you can afford one compare the total cost of ownership to any other car using Edmunds dot com "true cost to own" calculator. http://www.edmunds.com/tco.html I believe you will be surprised. The Volt even beats many used compact cars. The Edmunds TCO calculator has data for cars up to five years old.
      dacelbot
      • 6 Months Ago
      That's cool. You have to appreciate the Volt, and PHEV's are the future(well, the interim before full electrics.) I'd go with the Fusion PHEV though - a lot better looking IMO, and it doesn't scream "I'm obsessed with being green" since it's not an electric only model.
        Jim
        • 6 Months Ago
        @dacelbot
        I don't begrudge people their car choices. But for me personally I'll choose the US-made car over the Mexican-made car.
        Actionable Mango
        • 6 Months Ago
        @dacelbot
        I really, really want to like the Fusion PHEV, but the PHEV option is incredibly expensive compared to the standard. The battery itself creates a very obtrusive hump in the trunk space that also ruins the pass-through feature. The latter fact really illustrates why a chassis for an EV or PHEV should be designed with battery space in mind from the start. I don't mind the concept of one chassis for multiple power trains, as long as it was designed well for multiple power trains. The Fusion PHEV feels more like an ICE chassis with a battery tossed in the trunk.
        carney373
        • 6 Months Ago
        @dacelbot
        I can't stand the current-gen Fusion. Ugly squinty eyes, mean looking mouth. The 2010-2012 Fusion looked great, as did the 2010-2012 Mercury Milan. The Volt looks cool in my opinion as well. I still can't make up my mind whether the Leaf is cool and futuristic, or hugely dorky.
      Terry Actill
      • 6 Months Ago
      If GM could get it to run 100 miles on electric we'd buy one. One day. If they don't run out of money.
        Terry Actill
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Terry Actill
        Not sure why I got down voted. These recalls are doing serious damage to GM. I'd like GM to do well and produce another BETTER Volt or variants.
        ChaosphereIX
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Terry Actill
        yes...yes there is. You pay for advanced tech. And that tech is mileage. Want the mileage? Pay. At least for now.
        ChaosphereIX
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Terry Actill
        buy a Tesla. Done.
      Curtis
      • 6 Months Ago
      I love my Volt! I average over 103 MPG! I have almost 16,000 miles. I drive a 2012.
        paulwesterberg
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Curtis
        65% of .5B miles is 315m miles on electricity, 185m miles on gas. If we use EPA numbers of 98mpge on electricity and 37mpg combined on gas. Then we get total energy usage of 5m gallons of gas and 3,214,285.71 "gallons" of electricity. Total gallons used is 8,214,285.71 to cover .5B miles which tells us that the overall efficiency of the entire fleet is 60.87mpge. That very good, but a bit less then 90+mpge you can achieve with a pure battery electric vehicle.
        paulwesterberg
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Curtis
        Too bad the vehicle's computer doesn't count the electrical energy you use.
          2 wheeled menace
          • 6 Months Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          Electricity is free and zero emissions, remember? no need to calculate it into anything ;)
          Naturenut99
          • 6 Months Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          It's a simple general calculation. If it's that big of a deal to you. It tells you all you need to calculate it it tells you how many kWh's were used for how any miles you drove. Same with the gas. How many gallons for how many gas miles.
          Naturenut99
          • 6 Months Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          Plus having one number doesn't really help in the same way mpg would. You could tell how far you could go or howmuch it would cost based on that one number. Electricity and gas cost different amounts and the miles driven on either is different. It would be of little help to have it on screen.
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