With July 4th just around the corner, what better time could there be for Cars.com to announce that the Ford F-150 is the Most American car of 2013? This may be especially true since it was the Toyota Camry, a car produced by a company based in Japan, that had held the top spot from 2009 to 2012.

Cars.com compiles its Most American list by considering the amount of parts each vehicle uses that come from America, where it's final assembly takes place and how many units per year are sold. "While the assembly point and domestic parts content of the F-150 didn't change from 2012-2013, vehicle sales are responsible for bumping the F-150 to the top spot," according to Patrick Olsen, Editor-in-Chief of Cars.com.

As far as automakers go (as opposed to individual models), Toyota retains the top spot it held in 2012, with General Motors, Chrysler, Ford and Honda (in that order) rounding out the list. The motivation behind this list each year, according to Olsen, is "to help car shoppers understand that 'American-Made' extends beyond just the Detroit three" and because "a study we conducted in 2012 indicated that 25 percent of shoppers surveyed preferred to buy American."

It should be noted, however, that Cars.com isn't the only group with an American-made study, and not everyone agrees on the methodology used. In fact, a highly detailed study earlier this year by American University's Kogod School of Business found that the Lambda CUV triplets from GM are the most American-made nameplates, and there isn't a single vehicle from a Japanese automaker anywhere near its top ten.

Feel free to browse the press release below to see how the full top-10 list breaks down.
Show full PR text
Ford F-150 Named "Most American" in Annual Cars.com Index

CHICAGO – Cars.com, the premier online resource for buying and selling new and used cars, announced today that the Ford F-150 has topped the site's American-Made Index. This is the first time in four years that a domestic automaker is once again the "Most American." Prior to the F-150's top spot, the Toyota Camry topped the list from 2009-2012. The list is determined by analyzing three data points; domestic-parts content (percentage of vehicle's parts produced in the U.S.), final vehicle assembly point and vehicle sales.

"Strong sales and 75 percent domestic-parts content propelled Ford's popular F-150 to the top of the index for 2013, a rank it held from 2006 to 2008," said Patrick Olsen, Cars.com's Editor-in-Chief. "Ford's top ranking this year is a good indicator of how pickup trucks are dominating auto sales so far in 2013, and how the domestic automakers are bouncing back. While the assembly point and domestic parts content of the F-150 didn't change from 2012-2013, vehicle sales are responsible for bumping the F-150 to the top spot."

While the Toyota Camry is no longer the highest ranked on the list, Toyota still remains the brand with the greatest number of vehicles ranked. As was the case in 2012, the list remains an even split between foreign-owned and domestic-owned automakers, with five domestic brands and five foreign brands on the list. In addition to Toyota's four vehicles on the list, General Motors has a total of three. Chrysler, Ford and Honda each have one vehicle on the list.
Rank Make/Model Manufacturer U.S. Assembly Location(s) Rank in 2012
1. Ford F-150 Ford Dearborn, Mich.; Claycomo, Mo. 2
2. Toyota Camry Toyota Georgetown, Ky,; Lafayette, Ind. 1
3. Dodge Avenger Chrysler Sterling Heights, Mich. --
4. Honda Odyssey Honda Lincoln, Ala. --
5. Toyota Sienna Toyota Princeton, Ind. 4
6. Chevrolet Traverse General Motors Lansing, Mich. 6
7. Toyota Tundra Toyota San Antonio, Texas 7
8. GMC Acadia General Motors Lansing, Mich. 9
9. Buick Enclave General Motors Lansing, Mich. 10
10. Toyota Avalon Toyota Georgetown, Ky. --
"Buying American isn't necessarily the key decision maker for every car shopper; however a study we conducted in 2012 indicated that 25 percent of shoppers surveyed preferred to buy American," said Olsen. "The American-Made Index is meant to help car shoppers understand that 'American-Made' extends beyond just the Detroit three."

For full results and more information about the 2013 Cars.com American-Made Index, visit www.Cars.com or blogs.cars.com.


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  • 130 Comments
      Lemon
      • 1 Year Ago
      This study sounds like bogus... why do vehicle sales play any sort of role in how "American Made" it is? The university study mentioned in this article sounds much more realistic since it includes R&D as well as where the profits are going...
      Jesus!
      • 1 Year Ago
      How people can spew out garbage and sleep at night is beyond me. This report is invalid.
      Randy Perkins
      • 1 Year Ago
      Do they understand a truck is not a car....duh.
        Abdulla
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Randy Perkins
        Just for Fun What simplest meaning of car : A boxlike enclosure for passengers and freight on a conveyance.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Randy Perkins
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        Paul P.
        • 1 Year Ago
        I don't think you can really look at it from a total model lineup point of view when it comes to content. It's better to look at a vehicle by vehicle basis for two reasons: First, all the domestics have vehicles with both extremely high domestic content and extremely low domestic content, which makes a generalization unfair. Second, it's easy for a consumer to compare content, as it's listed right on the sticker. With that in mind, when looking strictly at content, Cars.com said they found 21 vehicles had 75% or greater domestic content. They then disqualified some from their list because their final assembly didn't take place in the US (or because the model was being discontinued). This is the total list of what they were left with, in order of most domestic content: -Toyota Avalon 85% -Honda Cross Tour, Ford Expedition/Lincoln Navigator, Honda Accord, Toyota Sienna: All 80% -Buick Enclave/Chevrolet Traverse/GMC Acadia, Jeep Liberty: 76% -Corvette, Camry, F150, Toyota Sequoia, Honda Pilot: 75% It's actually a surprisingly good mix of manufacturers. Notice how the F150 and Camry are actually two of the lowest on the list. However, they sell so many of each that their production requires the employment of a lot more (American) workers. That's why they ranked higher on the Cars.com index. They gave an example that the Corvette plant in KY has 514, whereas the Lamda (Enclave, etc) plant in Michigan has nearly 4,000. Now, I'm not sure how many employees there are making Camrys and F150's, but it has to be a lot. I do remember reading that Ford has nearly 1,000 workers in KY just building frames for the F150/Expedition/Navigator, never mind all the other assembly.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Paul P.
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          Paul P.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Paul P.
          I still think it's important to look at it on a vehicle by vehicle basis. Think of it this way: Lets say you hear that Ford (as a brand) has more domestic parts than, say Toyota (as a brand). So then you go out and buy a nice new Ford Transit Connect van. A vehicle that has
      billfrombuckhead
      • 1 Year Ago
      every Prius, rear wheel drive Lexus, 4runner, hybrid Lexus,Yaris, Scion,FJ Cruiser , Land Cruiser is made overseas.
        James
        • 1 Year Ago
        @billfrombuckhead
        Note to bill. When shopping for a vehicle, always check the serial number. The best vehicles have serial numbers that start with a J.
          Alfonso T. Alvarez
          • 1 Year Ago
          @James
          Clearly, because every vehicle he listed is at the bottom of their respective segments they are the best, right? You are on a roll today - so I guess you are a comedian, then, right? Because you sure don't seriously expect anyone actually believes you, do you?
        churchmotor
        • 1 Year Ago
        @billfrombuckhead
        Thanks for the heads up Bill. I'll look at those more closely when time to buy.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @churchmotor
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      truckguy
      • 1 Year Ago
      My brother has nothing but problems with his F150. I told him they are "JUNK DO NOT BUY IT" Now I JUST have to laugh at HIm with I TOLD YOU SO !!!! What A A HOLL
        caddy-v
        • 1 Year Ago
        @truckguy
        I'm not a Ford guy by any means but I have to call your comment nothing but pure BS. I AM a truck guy and I own several trucks for business some GMC's, Chevy's and yes, two fords and all have been very reliable. I'm in the construction business and perhaps know a hundred or more people with trucks and with the exception of some very old very high mile trucks have never heard a bad thing about Ford and GM trucks.
      churchmotor
      • 1 Year Ago
      LOL, " The motivation behind this list each year, according to Olsen, is "to help car shoppers understand that 'American-Made' extends beyond just the Detroit three"" Detroit Three. Anyone name three car companies based in Detroit.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @churchmotor
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          churchmotor
          • 1 Year Ago
          Damn, So even you admit GM is the ONLY one in Detroit. And BTW, Chrysler headquarters are in Turin Italy.
          The_Zachalope
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Churchmotor The sign in front of the huge building on Featherstone Rd. in Auburn Hills, MI would beg to differ with you.
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          vulnox
          • 1 Year Ago
          As someone who lived in the area and has parents that work at Ford WHQ, it is technically true that the city in which Chrysler and Ford are headquartered is NOT Detroit. But they are Metro (Suburbs of) Detroit as was mentioned several times. You can just about throw a rock from Ford WHQ into Detroit as it is really close to the border of what is considered the city of Detroit. Chrysler is a bit further out, but they are still in the Metro Detroit area. Having not actually been born and raised in the city of Detroit, I still just tell people I am from "Metro Detroit" or just "Detroit" because if I told them the actual city, 99% wouldn't have a clue. Now if Ford was HQ in Lansing, then yeah, this would be very wrong. On a technical level, as in, it isn't in the City of Detroit, ChurchMotor is right, but given their proximity and the zoning of the area, he is also just arguing semantics at this point and wasting time as if anyone asked me where Ford WHQ was who wouldn't be likely to know what "Dearborn" is, I would just say Detroit, as it seems they did in this article. He should have probably just said the "Michigan Three".
          churchmotor
          • 1 Year Ago
          Trying to think of a city more decrepit than Detroit. Perhaps Damascus or Lebanon. Only positive for those city is, they are probably safer than Detroit.
          • 1 Year Ago
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        richard
        • 1 Year Ago
        @churchmotor
        General Motors, Ford, and the American headquarters for Chrysler is Detroit. Any more questions, Oriental boy?
          • 1 Year Ago
          @richard
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          • 1 Year Ago
          @richard
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          churchmotor
          • 1 Year Ago
          @richard
          Richard, Chrysler is hardhearted in Turin Italy.
          churchmotor
          • 1 Year Ago
          @richard
          Oh how cute, yomama thinks FIAT is headquarted in Auburn Hills, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiat
          • 1 Year Ago
          @richard
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          • 1 Year Ago
          @richard
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          • 1 Year Ago
          @richard
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          churchmotor
          • 1 Year Ago
          @richard
          It's called a buyout, Chrysler Corporation went bankrupt years ago. The Government bailed them out and sold the assets to FIAT. FIAT is trying to buy the rest of the company from the UAW thugs that Obama gave the rest of the shares too, but those UAW fools think their stock price is worth about twice what it is in reality. So, not a merger, but a takeover by FIAT.
      Hazdaz
      • 1 Year Ago
      For the most part, this is all just pissing in the wind. Its immaterial if something is 90% or 92% made in the USA. BOTH of those are great numbers. What isn't immaterial though is that if it was up to the scumbag right wing nuts out there who wanted to see the Detroit automakers go out of business, there wouldn't be ANY cars built in the USA today. US car manufacturing , despite these republican traitors to sabotage it, is one of the strongest sectors of the economy today.
        jtav2002
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Hazdaz
        I never really thought about that, but it is ironic that the majority of the "buy American" people I know are in fact right wing, many of which opposed the bailout. Would they have just stopped buying cars then?
          Hazdaz
          • 1 Year Ago
          @jtav2002
          No kidding. I know quite a few of those people as well, and the hypocrisy is painful. Where does their allegiance lie... "buy American" and yet hate on GM for some reason, so they drive a Hyundai? Either way, the politicians that these people have been voting-in have been bad for America for decades and only now are we seeing how destructive their policies have been.
      zoom_zoom_zoom
      • 1 Year Ago
      All I know is, if a car has GM or Chrysler or Ford logos, it's off my list. They have taken enough of my money forcibly taken and given to the UAW and the greedy executives that gave themselves bonuses for running the companies into the ground. They can forever suck my... Never another penny from me.
        drewbiewhan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @zoom_zoom_zoom
        Who do you think comprises the UAW? PEOPLE! Why should the corporation and its shareholders get to keep all the money? Such a stupid comment. I love all the working class chuckle heads who have benefited from unions but then stand on the side of the millionaires and billionaires to argue against them.
          Allen
          • 1 Year Ago
          @drewbiewhan
          I have never benefit from union. I was hurt by the union, got fired because of union, lose my job cause the union forced the company I work for out of business. F the Union.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @zoom_zoom_zoom
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          zoom_zoom_zoom
          • 1 Year Ago
          So you are telling me that Honda, Toyota, and Nissan are giving USA Taxpayer money to their executives as bonuses. MY God you are stupid.
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        @zoom_zoom_zoom
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      churchmotor
      • 1 Year Ago
      So as usual, the kids are saying "It's where the profits" go. So, if you Buy a Jeep, or a Dodge, or a Chrysler, ALL the profits go to Turin Italy. RIGHT!
      jtav2002
      • 1 Year Ago
      The study is irrelevant because the "buy American" people don't really care where the car is really made or where the components come from, as long as it's an "American" company. Theoretically speaking you could have a Japanese car built here with 100% American parts (obviously wouldn't happen, just an example for arguments sake) and a domestic car built in Mexico with 70% American parts and the "buy American" crowd will choose the domestic.
        churchmotor
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jtav2002
        No kidding, the "Detroit" boys THINK a RAM Promaster Work Van is a "domestic" product.
        merlot066
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jtav2002
        If you look at the overall situation of the automotive industry the "Detroit 3" are still the most American companies. Ford, GM, and Chrysler still build a higher percentage of their vehicles in America and the ones that they don't build in America are built in countries like Canada and Mexico, who we have favorable trade practices with thanks to NAFTA. Mexico and Canada import the Taurus and Explorer, they export the Fusion and the Edge. Ford and other American companies have also made commitments to in-source jobs from other countries. In another cars.com study they found that the "Big 3" American automakers employed nearly 3 times as many workers in America as the Japanese companies combined.
          churchmotor
          • 1 Year Ago
          @merlot066
          Who are these THREE American Automakers to whom you refer?
          churchmotor
          • 1 Year Ago
          @merlot066
          Oh, and Chrysler has maintained some office space in Auburn Hills through each and every transition from owner to owner. Think of it like this, when a slum lord sells his awful apartment complex in Detroit to a new owner, the residents can continue to live in the slum apartment building, but the building has new owners.
          churchmotor
          • 1 Year Ago
          @merlot066
          Chrysler, Chrysler is an Italian Car company now. After Cerberus bought the company from Damlier, it went bankrupt and the Government took it over, gave a chunk to the UAW, and sold the rest to FIAT. FIAT is now the major share holder. Chrysler has not owned the company since the '80s.
          merlot066
          • 1 Year Ago
          @merlot066
          Funny how my +5 on a completely logical post got knocked down as soon as Churchmotor appeared. Anyway, "Chrysler Group LLC /ˈkraɪslər/ is an American automobile manufacturer headquartered in Auburn Hills, Michigan. It is a consolidated subsidiary of Italian multinational automaker Fiat" "Toyota Motor Corporation (トヨタ自動車株式会社 Toyota Jidōsha KK?, IPA: [toꜜjota]) /tɔɪˈoʊtə/, abbreviated TMC, is a Japanese multinational automaker headquartered in Toyota, Aichi, Japan." Toyota is absolutely not American. Chrysler remains somewhat American though not as entirely as Ford and GM. If you'd like to alter the statistics for those purposes I suppose you could say the two American car manufacturers employ twice as many Americans than the 4 or 5 Japanese companies combined. You're not helping your feeble argument either way.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @merlot066
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          @merlot066
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          @merlot066
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          @merlot066
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