2014 Fiat 500e
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Vital Stats

Engine:
83-kW electric motor
Power:
111 HP / 147 LB-FT
Transmission:
Single-speed
0-60 Time:
9+ Seconds
Top Speed:
85 MPH
Drivetrain:
Front-Wheel Drive
Curb Weight:
2,980 LBS
Seating:
2+2
Cargo:
7.0 CU-FT
MPG:
116 MPGe (combined)
Base Price:
$32,500
Cinquecento's Electrifying One-Price Strategy Is A Gas



America's electric vehicle segment is getting crowded, but sales remain tiny compared to the overall market. Listening to EV pitchmen, a key phrase heard over and over is "no compromises." This particular EV, the seller says, offers all* the things you want in a car, without the gasoline and without compromises. That asterisk thing? Well, sure, the electric vehicle paradigm requires you rethink the "one car that does everything" mentality, but once that's out of the way, there are no compromises here. No siree.

Of course, all EVs require compromises – but the truth is that every car forces owners to make compromises. Big SUVs don't always fit into parking spaces and suck down fuel. Subcompacts can't hold a gaggle of children and dogs. High-performance sports cars compromise wallets. Once you wrap your head around the idea that choosing electric is an option just like vehicle size or color – where no one choice is right for everybody, even if it's perfect for some – the 2014 Fiat 500e, going on sale this summer, asks a simple question: when you're driving in a city, why would you drive anything except an EV?

Fiat has been making the 500e at its Toluca, Mexico plant since early December, but it isn't busy building a million so that just anyone can own one. In fact, the automaker is going out of its way to make sure you don't buy a 500e if it's not right for you. The official website will soon have a "compatibility matching service" that will use information you feed it to determine if you're an EV candidate (we're guessing a short commute, an understanding of new technology and a place to charge at home will be the key factors). If the system doesn't think you're EV-ready, it'll propose a different 500 for you. Nice, huh?

So, does the 500e actually offer pure electric mobility without compromises? Yes and no. Mostly yes, and it's a fun yes.
2014 Fiat 500e side view2014 Fiat 500e front view2014 Fiat 500e rear view

Fiat has made going electric cost exactly zero extra dollars if you were already interested in the 500.

The key to the 500e, as we see it, is its surprisingly reasonable cost. The $32,500 MSRP (before incentives) isn't wildly different from other EVs available, even if government money and Fiat rebate incentives will push that down to a more palatable $20,500. The headline number, though, is the $199-a-month lease. That's for 36 months and with $999 down. If you've been shopping for a 500 recently, you might recognize those numbers as the same as if you were going after a gas-powered 500 Pop. In other words, Fiat has made going electric cost exactly zero extra dollars if you were already interested in another 500. Factor in High Occupancy Vehicle lane access and money saved at the gas station (actual money, not some fantasy $100/hour wage rate, Tesla), and the 500e looks like a tremendous deal for the right California commuters. Want proof? Let's put $199 a month into context with other all-electric vehicles available today.

The current bestselling EV is that Nissan Leaf (MSRP: $28,800), which once leased for $349 a month, a long time ago. We've since seen leases go for way lower – $139, for a limited time – but the standard lease price today is $199 a month for 36 months with an initial payment of $1,999. So, on the whole, a thousand bucks more than the 500e and you get a real back seat and more cargo capacity. From there, things climb steadily.

2014 Fiat 500e headlights2014 Fiat 500e wheel2014 Fiat 500e taillight2014 Fiat 500e rear bumper

The Mitsubishi i (MSRP: $29,125) was, for a short while, the low-cost EV star with a $69-month lease (less than some cell phone plans, which is kind of mind-warping to think about), but the normal rate is $221 a month for 36 months, with a whopping $3,445 due at signing. Another way of thinking of that total is that it's more than the first year of 500e lease payments, including the money due up front, $3,387). The Honda Fit EV (MSRP: $37,415) offers three-year leases for $389 a month with $389 due up front while the Ford Focus Electric (MSRP: $39,200), which bigger and so not exactly a direct competitor, runs $284 a month for 36 months with $929 due at signing. Daimler has not yet announced lease prices for the next-gen Smart Fortwo ED, but the previous generation leased for $599 a month. We don't know the exact MSRP for the Spark EV, but Chevrolet has promised it will cost "under $25,000 with tax incentives," which implies it'll be roughly the same as the Fiat. We're guessing Chevy is redoing its own lease option calculations in light of the 500e. (All these lease numbers come from the various manufacturer websites, with the classic 90210 zip code put in when required to get a quote. Local offers may vary.)

If you're not in California, then the Fiat's low price doesn't really mean squat.

The takeaway point is that, if you're leasing, the cheapest all-electric option today is the Fiat 500e, and you can even roll the cost of an at-home charge unit into the lease, which is done through Chrysler's Mopar division. All these low prices might explain how Fiat is probably going to lose about $10,000 on each 500e it sells – to say nothing of the free gas-vehicle rentals Fiat is throwing in with the 500e Pass.

Of course, price is just one thing, and there are all sorts of differences that come into play here – vehicle style, mileage limits, the availability of quick-charging – and if you're not in California, then the Fiat's low price doesn't really mean squat. Fiat has built DC fast charging capability into the battery packs, but there is no way to connect the car to a DC station. Fiat is waiting until the SAE Combo Charging infrastructure becomes more prevalent before possibly adding that option. For now, a standard J1772 connector and 6.6 kW charger let you refill the pack in under four hours.

2014 Fiat 500e charging port2014 Fiat 500e emissions sticker

The 500e's official range is a segment-leading 87 miles.

Speaking of filling up, no electric vehicle discussion is complete without a look at range. In fact, that's where many people start and stop. Range is important, and for the 500e, the official numbers are a combined miles per gallon equivalent (MPGe) of 116, with 122 MPGe in the city and 108 MPGe on the highway. Packing a big 24-kWh liquid-cooled and heated lithium-ion battery in the floorboard that doesn't encroach into the cabin, the 500e's official number is a segment-leading 87 miles. Our half-day experience in Los Angeles traffic and the swirly hills of Malibu convinced us that 100 miles is an entirely reasonable number. We drove 48.4 miles and used exactly 48 percent of our battery's state of charge. Your mileage will vary, of course, but this was our experience with the A/C on and not being terribly aggressive with the go pedal, the way we expect most people will. Unfortunately, we don't know our MPGe because we discovered a bug in the car's software, a bug that representatives promised will be fixed by the time the car goes on sale – or even by the time you read this, since Fiat is still tweaking the OS and flashing the cars to the latest version is apparently an easy task.

For comparison's sake, here are the official EPA numbers for other small electric vehicles (combined/city/highway):
  • 2013 Smart ED: 107/122/93 MPGe, 68-mile range
  • 2013 Ford Focus Electric: 105/110/99, 76-mile range
  • 2013 Honda Fit EV: 118/132/105 MPGe, 82-mile range
  • 2013 Mitsubishi i: 112/126/99 MPGe, 62-mile range
  • 2013 Nissan Leaf: 116/130/102, 75-mile range (but see this)
2014 Fiat 500e logo2014 Fiat 500e badge2014 Fiat 500e badge

Zipping from 0-40, we easily preferred the electric to the gas engine.

All of these numbers don't mean a darn thing if you don't like the way a car looks or drives. Thankfully, the 500e is a blast, and we actually like it better than its liquid-fueled 500 cousin, which has a ropey manual gearbox and lackluster power. In fact, unless you're a sucker for the exhaust noise, as some are, the 500 Abarth Cabrio that Fiat offered us right after the 500e drive actually felt slightly inferior at times. Right off the bat, you'd be forgiven if you thought the EV handles better than the gas-powered 500. They're both tall and narrow, but the heavy battery pack placed low in the 500e means the EV is more surefooted. We didn't think the Abarth was going to roll off the road at any point, but the 500e just felt more planted. We suspect the specially engineered suspension and new lower-body structure, which gives the EV a 10-percent improvement in bending stiffness, help the electric compete with the Abarth and its racing heritage. The more equal front-to-rear weight balance – 57/43 instead of 64/36 in the standard 500 – helps, too.

The 500e does not lack for power thanks to a 83-kW (111 horsepower) electric motor. Zipping from 0-40, we easily preferred the electric to the gas engine. The EV may only have one gear in the tranmission – engaged with an old-school push-button selector – but it goes down the road with confidence. A bit of trouble is felt when you accelerate from around 30 mph to highway speeds felt a bit lackluster – 0-60 is a bit over 9 seconds, around the same as the standard 500. We can certainly understand that some people will prefer the Abarth's soundtrack, but there's something to be said for motoring away in electric silence, too. If nothing else, it leaves more dino juice to burn (and we'll stay away from the fact that the Abarth has a 130-mph top speed while the EV can only get you 85 mph. Still, for on-road performance, 85 is enough for honest folk.

2014 Fiat 500e electric motor

When you're driving around the city in the 500e, you quickly forget you're not driving in a normal car. We would have liked some way to adjust the regenerative braking level, but that's not something Fiat thinks most drivers will be interested in. Instead, the engineers have made an EV for average drivers. The car creeps the way drivers expect normal torque-converter automatic cars to do, for example, and if you come to a stop on an uphill, if you don't put your foot on the brake, you will roll backward. Just like old times.

The engineers have made an EV for average drivers.

Hitting 80 mph on the highway in the EV was easy, quiet and smooth, but damn if it didn't suck range quicker than we were comfortable with. Well, theoretical range anyway, since the dashboard tries to give you a range estimate based on how you're driving, complete with a up or down arrow telling you if you're on track to increase or decrease that number if you keep doing what you're doing. Our six miles of highway driving quickly wiped out 20 miles of range, but we gained most of that back on the display in slower city driving soon thereafter. Combine the fun of the 500e with an EPA-estimated annual energy cost of just $500 on top of the $199 monthly lease payments, and the package begins to look awfully tempting.

The problem, of course, is that no one outside of California will be able to experience the 500e, unless they pull some strings. We were told the brand is interested in selling the model outside of California – Europe, Asia, other parts of North America – but for at least the first year, it will be limited to the Golden State.

2014 Fiat 500e gauges2014 Fiat 500e navigation system2014 Fiat 500e transmission buttons2014 Fiat 500e badge

The bright orange is an EV-exclusive, but we thought it looked best in dark gray.

There are more areas where the 500e exceeds its petroleum-loving family members. These are the most attractive stock wheels we can remember on an EV, and the 15-inchers also help with the car's aerodynamics. The bright orange color is an EV-exclusive, but we thought the dark gray (Fiat calls it Nero) with the e-Sport package looked the best. All 500e models have a reworked front fascia that has been sealed and otherwise modified to optimize airflow, resulting in a drag coefficient of 0.311, a 13-percent improvement over the 2013 500 Lounge. The bottom part of the nose has what Fiat calls a dot-matrix pattern that was inspired by Italian furniture and print designs from the 1960s. We'll take it if it boosts efficiency, but it does look a lot like a golf ball somewhere is missing its dimples.

The 500e comes in two main interior color schemes, Steam (a gray-white) or Nero (dark gray) that can be accented in various ways. The leatherette seats continue the dot-matrix style but, more importantly, they are comfortable enough whether zipping across town or stopped dead in traffic. No 500 – with any powertrain – is a true road trip car, so any hindquarter discomfort was secondary to the main focus of our few hours with the car: enjoying the drive.

2014 Fiat 500e interior2014 Fiat 500e front seats2014 Fiat 500e rear seats2014 Fiat 500e rear cargo area

Despite the fun, we certainly didn't enjoy everything the 500e packs into a tiny space. The 500e is fitted with the same cheesy aftermarket TomTom nav system found on other Cinquecentos. Despite the integrated EV options – charge station map, ability to send route information from your smartphone and energy management gauges – the unit sticks up so far that it really just gets in the way of actually seeing outside the car (a problem in other areas, too). Thankfully, you can remove it and shove it in the glove box when you don't need it (which we expect will be pretty much always).

Other plug-in cars have leaves and floating balls, the 500e has colored bars.

There are two other screens of note. The large central information readout offers a bunch of information at once, from speed to battery state-of-charge to whether you're driving in "power," "eco" or "charge" mode. These aren't modes in the sense that you can push a button to select them – the 500e doesn't play that game – they're just lights that reflect the way you're driving. Other plug-in cars have leaves and floating balls, the 500e has colored bars.

Then there's the in-dash audio system, which offers satellite radio and USB connections, but takes the dot matrix design motif back a few decades. Why the 500 – especially the high-tech 500e – can't get an actual touchscreen infotainment system is a mystery.

2014 Fiat 500e rear 3/4 view

Our problems with the 500e are really problems with the 500 in general.

A bigger mystery is why Fiat decided against giving the driver any driver's side visibility whatsoever. We nearly panicked the first time we turned our head to switch lanes and found nothing but a B-pillar thick enough to block anything but X-ray vision. As anyone who's been in a Honda Fit knows, a small car doesn't have to have limited visibility, which makes Fiat's lackluster solution – adding a spherical blind spot extension to the driver-side mirror – kind of sad. It's far less than ideal, but we did get used to it. The A-pillars are also too thick, impeding forward visibility.

We remain unhappy with the central window controls and the lack of a passenger armrest but, again, these are knocks against the 500 line as a whole, and have nothing to do with the drivetrain. And that's the key point here. Our problems with the 500e are really problems with the 500 in general. Within its range, this electric model actually outpoints its gas-powered sibling for refinement and low-end power. For some, the benefits of electric power will be outweighed by the fears of what the car can't do (drive from LA to Las Vegas without some major hassles, for example). That's just the way it is in EV land today. The fact that Fiat is offering – in admittedly limited numbers and in one state for the moment – an EV that plays well in traffic, doesn't cost a dime more than its gas-powered brethren and has real character is something worth celebrating.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 86 Comments
      MarkEngr
      • 2 Years Ago
      Fiat has a winner here; will do very well in congested areas mainly. Now once Fiat sees the reponse for the 500E, it will spread to other US markets quickly.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @MarkEngr
        [blocked]
          tump
          • 2 Years Ago
          The voting system here has repeatedly rated _you_ as delusional.
          gpmp
          • 2 Years Ago
          Of course it is heavier, because of the batteries. It probably has a more comfortable and stable ride as a result, all the while getting 3 to 4 times the mpg.
          ferps
          • 2 Years Ago
          Why does the weight matter? It handles better than the regular car and is clearly uses less energy.
      ferps
      • 2 Years Ago
      An electric car that isn't a penalty box that you can actually afford! Sign me up!
      Whis Ky
      • 2 Years Ago
      Can I get one in Texas, dammit? This would be perfect for the wife's commute, and $199 a month with zero gas cost is awesome.
      Dwight Heckelman
      • 2 Years Ago
      Gah, I meant $199/mo. Still in. Still eff.
      karlInSanDiego
      • 2 Years Ago
      Can anyone explain how this Fiat with a 6.6kW on board charger can fully charge 24 kWh battery 4 hours at Level 2, but it takes ~24 hours at 110V? J1722 specs do allow for 10:1 difference between the max current of each (19.2 kW in 80A 240V vs. 1.92 kW in 16A 120V, so I don't question if it's true. But I don't remember any other BEV bothering to claim such a terrible 110V charge time. Maybe everyone else buried that factoid because it's embarrassing. Needless to say, charging at 110V should only be used during the first stages of the Zombie Apocalypse. I think this car seems pretty awesome, especially given that it's a compliance car with terrible initial Cd (.35) like my 2007 MINI Cooper S(.39)
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        A_Guy
        • 2 Years Ago
        At 87 miles, this will cover my round trip of 60 miles of commuting daily. So, before you keep calling people morons, realize that this can do more than frolic around in the city.
        tump
        • 2 Years Ago
        When in my city, you can **** right off.
        cpmanx
        • 2 Years Ago
        You are an arrogant fool, and probably a dishonest one at that. As I noted below, I live in NYC in an area decently served by mass transit. I commute to work that way every day. But when I'm picking up 100 pounds of potting soil from Lowe's, like I did last weekend, I'm not going to do it on the subway. When I'm picking up two weeks' worth of groceries from Fairway, like I did yesterday, I'm not going to walk 5 blocks, take two buses, and transfer. When I'm taking my daughters to the LIberty Science Center, I'm not going to take two subways, a ferry, and a light rail. I can get to LaGuardia airport in 25 minutes by car, or in 2 hours by mass transit while lugging my suitcases onto two subways and a commuter bus. The point here is that even in NYC it is very hard to live by mass transit alone, and so a city car makes good sense. In other cities, living by mass transit alone is ever harder.
      Breitling
      • 2 Years Ago
      what is the difference between this fiat 500 and one made 20 years ago? same ugly look and no power.
        tump
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Breitling
        You're named after an overpriced ugly-ass watch, so who are you to comment?
        waetherman
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Breitling
        How is it that you can write a complete sentence but never learned to read?
        Daniel
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Breitling
        1) Fiat didn't make a 500 in 1993 2) You, sir, are an idiot
          johnnythemoney
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Daniel
          Actually, there was the Cinquecento introduced in 1991, which then evolved into the Seicento which was latter named 600, just to show the irrelevancy of having the name written in letters or numbers. But he's still an idiot.
        Scooter
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Breitling
        Hes not an idiot, just has the years wrong, and hes totally right, the Fiat 500 is underpowered, dismal MPG that many better bigger cars achieve, coupled with dull looks. Its just a poormans Mini Cooper.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Breitling
        [blocked]
      goodoldgorr
      • 2 Years Ago
      I think that if they fitted a small gasoline range extender, like a 2 cylinder 800cc size engine it would help it to become a complete car for approx 4 000$ more. I prefer to pay 4 000$ more and the perceived value is 2x what it is with just a battery. It can beat the volt because the volt has a too big range extender adding weight and cost.
        Nemebean
        • 2 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        This is a joke, right? Nobody could expect them to cram a gas engine and tank on top of the EV powertrain in something this size. Could they?
      Ducman69
      • 2 Years Ago
      No compromises? Cost of ownership is higher both short and long-term and performance and range are mediocre at best. For this price instead of a budget Italian economy car, I can get a luxury German compact car like the 2014 Audi A3, with far better performance and the diesel is likely to run as strong at 100,000 miles as it does off the showroom floor, whereas we know (especially in the hot South) batteries diminish in capacity every year. And at 50mpg, the A3 has a range around 700 miles extended indefinitely since fuel is available around the country. There aren't sufficient compatible outlets to charge this EV in a reasonable amount of time, and the "refueling" is much more frequent. And with around 240ftlbs just off idle, the A3 will feel so much livelier. This makes no sense unless you have to have an electric car (charging off the nearest coal station). Don't get me wrong, I'll get an electric car too in the future no doubt (just as I converted my entire RC airplane fleet to electric and my whole lawn maintenance from mower to weeder to blower), but the compromises right now plain suck for cars.
        Rotation
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        You clearly don't understand torque. If you don't understand torque, just leave out any mention of it. You are aware the A3 gets 34mpg combined, not 50, right?
          Ducman69
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          And if you do have an engineering degree, you probably know about torque multiplication and that torque at higher RPM is more useful in doing work, right? I was pointing out its available early so that lazy driving is rewarded, but hey if you prefer to ride around in a cheapo plastic Italian sub-compact econobox rather than a luxury car... by all means bro. ;)
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          Ducman69: You shouldn't feel embarrassed for anyone else. The fuel economy figures you are quoting are on the European Cycle, not the US EPA cycle. To quote AB about the car: 'As far as economy goes, highway mileage in the US would peak somewhere around 45 miles per gallon.' As to torque, the fact that you quote torque at the engine shaft when comparing to an EV is indication enough you don't know anything about torque. Comparing torque at the motor output when the two cars have different final drives and one has a gearbox is completely useless. And then there's that you somehow thing that an EV is going to be down on low-end torque versus any ICE "just off idle" is showing that you don't know what's up. Learn about torque, then speak about it. Not vice-versa.
          Ducman69
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          Rotation, nice straw man argument. I said nothing of the sort, and pointed out that the TDI boasts far more torque and at a lowly RPM at that, which is pointed out specifically because it is a combustion engine and thus does need revs but a turbo one at that which typically means even higher revs. In this case though, its a relatively high compression low boost quick spooling turbo, so peak torque comes at a very low RPM. And this may come as a surprise to you, but virtually all vehicles have different final drives and yet somehow we manage to compare them nonetheless. If you want to convince people that losses to the wheel between the two are going to be so great to compensate for such a massive power deficit on the 500e, I want some of whatever you are smoking. Seriously, I mean how hard did you really even think about this? It has a top speed of merely 85mph and 0-60mph time estimated of over 9 seconds. The Audi A3 TDI is slow too, but not that slow. And that's hauling around a lot of luxury and bigger platform in general and not a virtually empty smaller subcompact with a hollow plastic cabin.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          Ducman69: You quoted the torque at the shaft coming off of idle. You said it would have "with far better performance". You said "And with around 240ftlbs just off idle, the A3 will feel so much livelier." I'm not making up a strawman. You argued that an A3 Diesel would outperform and be much livelier off idle than a FIAT 500e. When you have a gearbox with multiple gears, changing final drives just isn't as big a deal. You can compare decently with torque at the shaft because ICEs all have similar rev ranges (1000-about 6000) and have gearboxes to keep the revs in that range. But EVs don't. They don't work that way. So you can't compare torque at the shaft between EVs and ICE cars. Just as an example, an EV could have TWICE the torque at the shaft and still have less torque at the wheels because at low revs because the ICE car has a gearbox with a near 3:1 torque multiplier in 1st gear. And no, I made no argument about "losses to the wheel". The issue is gearing, not losses. This is something you would understand if you had an understanding of torque. You're over your head. You'd do better to ask questions instead of continuing to show your ignorance. And as to the performance of the vehicles, the 0-60 of the A3 TDI (150HP model as you speak of) is expected to be 8.7s. So much for the idea that the A3 TDI is going to feel so much livelier. You're right about the top speed, EVs run out of top speed because they cannot make enough power at high revs to keep up. If you plan to do much driving above 85mph (or a lot above 80mph) then get the A3 TDI instead.
        Nick H
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        Where are you getting an A3 for $20,500? Also, coal fired power plants are still much more efficient than internal combustion engines.
          johnnythemoney
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Nick H
          The A3 doesn't get any sort of Government money.
          Ducman69
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Nick H
          Did you even bother to read this article? The 500e base price, before options, is $32,500, not $20,500.
        fly by wireless
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        even on coal, electric is cleaner bud. That's a red herring that's long stale and smelly. It's about the right tool for the job. A car like this would be a perfect primary car for most people who keep the gas car for when they need it.
        JakeY
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        I think Rotation has a point. Let's look at the numbers: 2013 500e 111 hp / 147 lb-ft, 0-60 9.1 seconds 2013 A3 TDI 140 hp / 236 lb-ft, 0-60 8.9 seconds Based on the way EVs accelerate, I'm willing to bet the 0-30 of the 500e is going to be better than the TDI (30-60 mph is going to be slower). If that's the case, the 500e is going to feel livelier, esp. in the city which this car is designed for.
        cynicalrick
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        You clearly don't understand that the whole basis of value here is the lease deal.
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        It is only sold in California and we have very little coal generation at all. We are mostly natural gas, nuke, wind, hydro, and solar. Very little coal at all. Maybe you should emulate us.
      throwback
      • 2 Years Ago
      "the 2014 Fiat 500e, going on sale this summer, asks a simple question: when you're driving in a city, why would you drive anything except an EV?" Because I have no place to plug it in? EVs make great suburban runabouts. When you live in an apartment, not so much.
        SublimeKnight
        • 2 Years Ago
        @throwback
        Its funny that everywhere you look, there are powerlines and things running on electricity, yet lack of access to electricity is a major stumbling block for EVs. Like the saying old saying, "water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink"
        Harry
        • 2 Years Ago
        @throwback
        throwback, I live in Northern Virginia and my condo is run by a board that is probably averaging 65 years old, and they are installing special plugs for future electric cars. They also set the "plug in rights" fee to $20 a month, which I think is pretty sporting. If my condo is willing to do it, I would bet apartment buildings will be doing it soon as a way to look modern and green.
          throwback
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Harry
          Cities are a different animal. I grew up in NYC and most buildings do not have garages. For cities like NYC the independent garages have to see a reason (profit) to install chargers.
        ferps
        • 2 Years Ago
        @throwback
        this is true. one big problem for EVs is that the people who would benefit from them the most often have nowhere to plug them in.
      Matthew Dawson
      • 2 Years Ago
      "A bigger mystery is why Fiat decided against giving the driver any driver's side visibility whatsoever. We nearly panicked the first time we turned our head to switch lanes and found nothing but a B-pillar thick enough to block anything but X-ray vision." Or, you know, you could just have your mirrors set right so you don't have to look over your shoulder and take your eyes off of the road. I know you're probably older weren't taught that, but it's really useful and easier than turning around.
        reattadudes
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Matthew Dawson
        I added spot mirrors to my 500 the first day I had it, like I do with every one of my other vehicles.
        Tysto
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Matthew Dawson
        If you\'re not looking over your shoulder before changing lanes or backing up, you\'re a bad driver. All mirror settings have blind spots.
      Zachary
      • 2 Years Ago
      I love the Fiat 500 but my first thought when I saw that price tag was "I could buy a Cadillac ATS with that money". I think this will be a hard sell for most people.
        MF
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Zachary
        after $7.5k government aid (that we pay for), plus $2.5k from the california government, the price of this thing starts to seem like a bargain..
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