The steady-handed folks at Porsche Classic are now willing to sell you a perfectly reproduced emblem for your early 911 or 356. The work that goes into creating this badge, it seems, is fairly extraordinary.

This epically scored mini film – seriously, it sounds like a Wagner-meets-Chant up in there – is like a Mr. Rogers video short, but for car guys. Follow along as the Porsche crest goes from hunk of metal to shiny icon, with typical German precision. Scroll down to find the details in Porsche's press release, as well.
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Such an unmistakeable and sought-after symbol has naturally had a very colourful and sometimes unusual history and been copied many times. To eliminate all doubt, the experts at Porsche Classic delved deep into the history of the crest, which was first suggested as a quality seal for the Type 356 at a meeting between Ferry Porsche and US importer Max Hoffman back in 1952. In the same year, advertising manager Herrmann Lapper and designer Franz Xaver Reimspieß produced a preliminary design that is still used to this day with just a few minor differences in detail. Reimspieß, who is also said to have designed the Volkswagen logo in 1936, sketched a magnificent crest that symbolised the roots of the company as well as the dynamism and quality of its products. At the centre of the golden shield, the horse of the official coat of arms of Stuttgart is depicted along with the name of the city. The composition is surrounded by the red and black state colours and the stylised antlers from the crest of Württemberg-Hohenzollern. The all-encompassing Porsche logo acts as a protective "roof" over all the design elements.

In contrast to the current crest, the Porsche logo on the original crest was only embossed and was not black. In addition, the red elements of the crest were actually more orange in colour to reflect the Württemberg-Hohenzollern state colours. The Classic experts charged with reproducing the crest went a lot further than merely ensuring that the colours were true to the original. The crest is being produced using special tools based on original drawings. The silver and gold plating is being applied using the same technique as the original and the colour and enamelling are being meticulously applied by hand.

The new "old" crest has also had to undergo the same quality tests as the original. This involved the simulation of a stone impact test using a ballistic firing range at the Research and Development Centre in Weissach. The crest also spent 240 hours in the salt spray chamber.

The Porsche crest passed these challenging tests with flying colours, thus proving its credentials as a genuine quality product, 100 per cent made in Germany. This symbol, steeped in history, signals a continued long life for classic Porsche models.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 26 Comments
      specific.grammar
      • 2 Years Ago
      Remanufacture... You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.
      colin.shark
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is a textbook example of great luxury branding. Making the brand seem essential and mystical. As if the emblem itself is the special sauce in the cars. When you can move a lot of units without diluting the brand, you've hit pay dirt. Porsche is a master at this.
      Thehotaustin
      • 2 Years Ago
      Awesome!!
      dukeisduke
      • 2 Years Ago
      Cloisonne emblems, done the old fashioned way.
      William Miller
      • 2 Years Ago
      Incredible handcraft)
      Ducman69
      • 2 Years Ago
      A beautiful demonstration of how inefficient Porsche is, and excellent example of diminishing returns when it comes to the old slogan "you get what you pay for". Personally, I'll take a car that costs half as much with twice the performance, Danke Schoen!
        Svartorn
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        Thankfully, not everyone shares your sentiment for cheapness. I can't afford a classic Porsche (or a new one for that matter) but I'm certainly glad we have people out there taking pride in their work - otherwise every car on earth would be like Kia or Chevrolet.
        warren,
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        Twice the performance at half the price..... so, ummm, that'd be convertible that has 530hp, a 0-60 of 2.75 seconds, and a top speed almost 70mph faster than a Bugatti Veyron.... and it would cost less than a Golf GTI. What car is this again?
          nomadsto
          • 2 Years Ago
          @warren,
          thumbed you down by mistake - totally agree
        ammca66564
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        Very simple. He's talking about a Corvette. 911 performance, half the price. And before you all go attacking me as a philistine, I drive a 911. Call me a sucker, but I love it.
          DRAGON
          • 2 Years Ago
          @ammca66564
          A Corvette? With its poor quality and its carriage inspired chassis? No thanks...
          body.bog
          • 2 Years Ago
          @ammca66564
          He said "twice the performance at half the price". No corvette is 2x the performance at x/2 the price.
        Hatzenbach
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        80% of all 911 ever produced are still on the road thanks to that unmatched quality, many of them as daily drivers. no ridiculous marketing claims, voided warranties or cheap ass plastic exteriors and interiors. it's like you said: you get what you pay for!
          Hatzenbach
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Hatzenbach
          Porsche was in financial trouble during that time. the Boxter was the car that saved them and i agree that they had to cut costs at the expense of quality & reliability. At least they didn't need a bailout like others and fixed their problems on their own, thanks to one of the greatest managers in the industry, Wendelin Wiedeking.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        [blocked]
      Brodz
      • 2 Years Ago
      ahhh.... craftsmanship. They way it used to be done.
        Ducman69
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Brodz
        Yes, it is the way it used to be done... for a reason. Most of the industrialized world has moved on to more advanced machinery that can achieve a virtually identical result with plenty of profit built in for a $20 emblem rather than this which likely sells for $250 after "Porsche tax". Nothing wrong with throwing money away, but I prefer to waste it on drugs and hookers.
      Rick Rea
      • 2 Years Ago
      Really enjoy seeing craftsmanship at its best!
      superchan7
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'll just keep the one on my 2008. It looks close enough.
        body.bog
        • 2 Years Ago
        @superchan7
        It's old enough. You might want to take it in to see if they care for "classics".
      James Scott
      • 2 Years Ago
      Remanufacture? Looks like manufacture to me. No Re- involved. I was expecting some restoration thing like BMW's restoration service. Even the youtube video says manufacture. Be like if every episode of This Old House they were actually building new houses.
        Rob Gomes
        • 2 Years Ago
        @James Scott
        Porsche Classic will manufacture new parts from scratch (using either original molds/schematics, or modified ones if they drastically improve the reliability of the original part design) if necessary.
      Rick Rea
      • 2 Years Ago
      Very cool!
      Pixel Eater
      • 2 Years Ago
      Now that's what I call pedantic
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