BMW's Motorrad division has made a number of changes to its 2013 model-year range, most of it having to do with paint colors. The preeminent development is that all of its bikes, worldwide, will come with ABS standard.

The move comes three years ahead the European Union's 2016 requirement that all motorcycles sold there come with ABS, and is an evolution of BMW Motorrad's Safety 360 initiative. That umbrella looks at rider safety from the perspectives of motorbike technology, rider equipment and gear, and rider training, all of which BMW Motorrad has its hands in. On top of ABS, BMW has developed other technology for motorcycles that's usually heard in conjunction with cars: electronic suspension adjustment, automatic stability control, dynamic traction control and adaptive headlights.

The 2013 models will be available in dealerships starting next month. Scroll down for a press release detailing all the changes.
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BMW Motorrad model update for the model year 2013. BMW Motorrad ABS available as standard in all models worldwide. Dynamic and Touring packages for the BMW F 800 R.

Munich, 06.07.2012 -- A number of model updates will be integrated in the BMW Motorrad program for the model year 2013.The models will be available for order in the new configuration at all BMW Motorrad dealerships from August 2012.

BMW Motorrad ABS available as standard in all models worldwide.
As a leading motorcycle manufacturer, BMW Motorrad has always been aware of its social responsibility in connection with motorcycling safety. In 1988 the company presented the world's first serial production motorcycles with the antilock brake system ABS - the most effective technical safety bonus to this day. Now follows the next logical step: as of the model year 2013, BMW Motorrad will be the first manufacturer in the world to provide ABS in all models as standard. This is a proactive step, clearly pre-empting the requirement for ABS which is likely to be introduced in 2016 for all newly registered motorcycles in Europe.

[For further details, please consult the press kit "Responsibility beyond the vehicle: the BMW Motorrad principle "Safety 360°".]

BMW F 800 R.
From model year 2013 the BMW F 800 R is available in the following new paint finishes:
- Racing blue metallic/Alpine white
- Sapphire black metallic

The following paint finishes are no longer available: Alpine white/Black satin gloss, Magma red/White aluminium metallic matt.

BMW F 800 R Dynamic package.
In the Dynamic package, BMW Motorrad offers a combination of options and special accessories which underline the dynamic flair of the BMW F 800 R even more strikingly. The package comprises:
- Engine spoiler
- LED rear light
- LED turn indicators
- Pillion seat cover

The Dynamic package is available for the F 800 R from August in conjunction with a new vehicle order. The package price in Germany is € 295.- incl. 19 % VAT (price saving € 138.-).

BMW F 800 R Touring package.
The ideal package motorcyclists who love to travel, the new Touring package for the F 800 R focuses on ride comfort and touring capability. The package comprises:
- Heated grips
- On-board computer
- Socket
- Luggage rack
- Pannier holder
- Centre stand

The Touring package is available for the BMW F 800 R from August in conjunction with a new vehicle order. The package price in Germany is € 495.- incl. 19 % VAT (price saving € 215.-).

BMW G 650 GS.
From model year 2013 the BMW G 650 GS is available in the following new paint finish:
- Sunset yellow

The paint finish Orange red is no longer available.

BMW R 1200 R.
From model year 2013 the BMW R 1200 R is available in the following new paint finishes:
- Montego blue metallic
- Magnesium beige metallic

The paint finishes Red apple metallic and Smoke grey metallic are no longer available.

BMW S 1000 RR.
From model year 2013 the BMW S 1000 RR is available in the following new paint finish:
- Granite grey metallic matt

The paint finish Bluefire is no longer available.

BMW K 1300 S.
From model year 2013 the BMW K 1300 S is available in the following new paint finish:
- Sapphire black metallic/Dark graphite metallic

The paint finish Magma red/Sapphire black metallic is no longer available.

BMW K 1300 R.
From model year 2013 the BMW K 1300 R is available in the following new paint finishes:
- Racing red/Sapphire Black metallic
- Sapphire black metallic/Black satin gloss

The paint finishes Ostra grey metallic matt/Sapphire black metallic, Light grey metallic and Black satin gloss/Granite grey metallic matt are no longer available.

The sports wheels previously available as an optional extra are now included in the range of standard fittings. The Dynamic package of the K 1300 R therefore no longer includes them. The latter thus comprises heated grips, on-board computer, LED turn indicators, the Sport windshield, Electronic Suspension Adjustment ESA II and the shift assistant. The package price has been adjusted downwards accordingly and is now € 890.- (previously € 1,000.-; price valid for the German market).

BMW K 1600 GT.
From model year 2013 the BMW K 1600 GT is available in the following new paint finishes:
- Dark graphite metallic
- Montego blue metallic

The paint finish Vermilion red metallic is no longer available.

The LED additional headlamps are available as of October 2012 as a new option for the K 1600 GT (previously only for the K 1600 GTL).

In the 5.7-inch TFT colour screen on the instrument panel, there is now an optional digital speed display or the logo "6".

BMW K 1600 GTL.
From model year 2013 the BMW K 1600 GTL is available in the following new paint finishes:
- Dark graphite metallic
- Damask red metallic

The paint finish Royal blue metallic is no longer available.

In the 5.7-inch TFT colour screen on the instrument panel, there is now an optional digital speed display or the logo "6".


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 29 Comments
      Duffs10
      • 2 Years Ago
      I have a BMW F800GS (ABS was £500 or something extra) which is my second bike with ABS. 99% of the time it stays silent in the background, but the one time a minibus merges into your lane without looking on oil-slicked city streets just after it starts to rain, it will be worth its price x1000. In a situation where there are inches between you an a slab sided van on one side, and inches between you and a wrought iron pedestrian fence on the other, any skidding, front or rear will generally result in tears. I know a lot of bikers aspire to be professional race riders (or have convinced themselves that they are) but I can't get my head around those who fervently insist that they'll never have it on their bike, it's the spawn of satan, it's not manly blah blah blah... ALL the stats I've come across show it reduces accidents relating to skids (on road) from beginners to seasoned bikers, police, emergency service bikers etc. Off road of course is a different matter which is why there is a switch to turn it off on virtually all dual sport/enduro bikes. Reliability-wise it has been on par with my previous Honda, and the dealer servicing/maintenance is about 40% cheaper for the BMW, go figure. New pricing is roughly the same as equivalent bikes from other manufactures, this is in Europe though, in North America this may not be the case... Well done to BMW for making it standard, shame they didn't do it when I bought my bike.
      IOMTT
      • 2 Years Ago
      These things are all well and good but do not mean much when paired with an unskilled and untrained rider. Perhaps the money spent on all these electronic aids would be better used for rider training. I would rather buy a non ABS bike that came with a road and track school than pony up the cash that these things will add to the MSRP.
        Hazdaz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IOMTT
        yes, because its either or. for some reason you can't have ABS AND take a training course. let me guess, you don't wear seat belts in your car because you think a "trained" driver can throw themselves out of a vehicle and into safety better than any gosh darn gizmos could, right? :rolleyes:
          IOMTT
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Hazdaz
          Reread my comment. Let me paraphrase for those who lack comprehension skills or perhaps it could be my writing skills. Electronic aids will not save the untrained and or unskilled. I did say they were all well and good but I would rather not have them as they cost big money up front and when things go awry. But what the hell do I know, I have only been riding a quarter century and have a lot of experience varied machinery.
          IOMTT
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Hazdaz
          Are you PAYING for both? Which gives you more for your $$$? Electronic wizardry or skill?
        adrenalnjunky
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IOMTT
        That's what people thought - even us riders, a few years ago. But the S1KRR pictured above is so good, and so capable of being forgiving, it can actually be a better teaching tool for street and track skills than a bike without the electronics. But don't take my word for it - Keith Code/California Superbike School swears by them: http://www.superbikeschool.com/machinery/bmws1000rr.php It doesn't mean that any yahoo can buy one and become a better rider, it means that with the bike, they can be taught properly, by an instructor, how to handle the bike better.
        Myself
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IOMTT
        I guess you'd prefer a bike with drum brakes, a 2-stroke engine, etc.... You can't stop progress. Just as disc brakes made bikes safer, so will the ABS.
          IOMTT
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Myself
          A lot of readers missed the point I was trying to get across. Or I missed delivering the point. I thought the part where I mentioned the tech was "well and good" was my qualifier. But yes, I do prefer older bikes for riding and wrenching. Safer riders make motorcycling safer.
        Idle Shell
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IOMTT
        For most drivers, ABS is a valuable driver aid. If you don't like it on your bike, pull the breaker that controls the abs pump and move on with your day.
          kevin
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Idle Shell
          Hell, judging from my friends experience with his two GS1150R's the ABS will be in failure mode most of the time anyway. Down side of "pulling the fuse" is it kills the power brake booster.
        jonnybimmer
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IOMTT
        Normally I'd agree with the anti-electronic aid argument, but ABS is the one system that I have a very hard time reasoning against. There's a reason why all cars have ABS nowadays. As far as traction/stability/you're-doing-it-wrong control goes, yes, those are all systems I feel interfere with the motion and feeling a driver/rider gets from their machine, but giving people the ability to stop substantially better in emergency situations is one of those things that make me feel better being out on the road. It lessens the chance of a rider crashing into me and I'm all for that.
        kevin
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IOMTT
        Don't like it? Buy a KLR 650 or something from Cleveland Cycle Werks. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kawasaki_KLR650 http://www.clevelandcyclewerks.com/bikes/
        Duffs10
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IOMTT
        ...oops hit submit... Both safety options and rider training both reduce insurance premiums here, the same bike will be more expensive to insure without the ABS option, for example. And taking a certified rider training course can save up to 20% on a year's insurance. Not sure how it works in the States but it would encourage people to get the right training if discounts were offered and that's better for everyone.
        Duffs10
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IOMTT
        Rider training certainly plays an important part, commuting in London daily all year round I would consider myself a seasoned and experienced rider, but still take the time once a year to do a one-day refresher course through the police or DVLA (licence bureau). They always pick up any bad habits I've accumulated so I can work on them. But it's not an either/or scenario - even a first time, unskilled biker will benefit from their machine keeping the wheels turning at all times, if anything even more so, because an unskilled biker is more apt to grab a fistful in panic if something goes horribly wrong, where someone with more experience will look for an escape route where possible. When the wheels stop, so do the gyroscopic forces that keep the bike upright and most riders will come off at that point. As an aside, the insurance rates for the expensive, large touring bikes (which includes bikes such the BMW GS range) are well below average for full comprehensive insurance, not least because their girth makes them more visible to car drivers, but also because they tend to be sold with all the electronic options and are statistically involved in far fewer accidents than the smaller bikes (CBRs, GSX-Rs etc). Not to mention they require an awfully big van and several very strong blokes to steal.
      ROLO
      • 2 Years Ago
      only because a japanese company did it first as always.
        JSH
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ROLO
        I'm curious which Japanese company you think offers ABS standard on all of their motorcycles. Honda said it was going to offer ABS as an option on bikes worldwide back in 2007 but then they didn't follow through. The vast majority of motorcycles for sale in the US by Japanese manufacturers do not have ABS even as on option. That includes models offered with ABS in other markets.
      desinerd1
      • 2 Years Ago
      Shouldn't they figure out how to make reliable cars first?
      ishmaelcrowley
      • 2 Years Ago
      BMW -- motorcycles for the Borg.
      SpikedLemon
      • 2 Years Ago
      ABS is on most of their motorcycles already. And it's BMW: what's a couple extra bucks on their pricetag anyway? I'm not sold on ABS. And I'm certainly not in favor of paying up to $1500 that motorcycle manufacturers seem to think it's worth. My recent motorcycle addition does not have ABS.
      michigan
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is auto blog, not motorcycle blog
      bleexeo
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's about time.
      k_m94
      • 2 Years Ago
      I am not a bike guy and to me, they all seem pretty much the same, at least within their category. But that twofaced S 1000 RR seems to be the 2 wheeled equivalent of a quite heavily tuned GTR. Nothing touches its speed, it's loaded with tech to make a decent rider feel like a hero, and it doesn't make you spit out your oatmeal and roll around laughing when you see the price, because it's a screaming bargain almost. Except imagine a GTR with one of its headlight fairings ripped apart and brutal slashes on one side giving a sinister look of asymmmetry.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      jonnybimmer
      • 2 Years Ago
      But will the kids still be able to do stoppies? Seriously though, I thought all Beemers had ABS already. Which model was still missing it? One of their scooters?
        MHayes
        • 2 Years Ago
        @jonnybimmer
        Beemer bikes have had ABS since the late 80's by this is the first time it has been standard across it's entire line.
        Duffs10
        • 2 Years Ago
        @jonnybimmer
        It's optional on many models to date. Either as an individual option, or part of the 'comfort package' typically which will also include things like heated grips and main/centre stand. Most dealers in the UK only stock bikes with the comfort package and those who don't want it need to put in a factory order.
      Dasteknoviking
      • 2 Years Ago
      Most of you guys who say you would not pony up for ABS on a bike oviously dont ride enough... Week ago I got side swipped by 2 kids in a Pontiac, if it wasn't for the ABS which helped me bring my K1200 down to a safe stop I might not be here typing this out. On top of that BMWs other than the S1000 have linked brakes with gyroscopic brake force equalization, meaning when you hit that lever the bike will stop in a normal manner. You try hitting the brake lever too hard on a GSX-R and you will be flipping over that suddenly stopped car infront of you. They need to figure out their final drive failures..... other than that BMW bikes are nothing like their cars.
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