If you're European and have a cool $80,000 at your disposal, you probably don't have to worry fuel costs. Volvo would like to give you the option to care about them even less, though, just in case.

Across the pond, the Swedish automaker plans to start deliveries of its V60 diesel plug-in hybrid by the end of the year, Plugin Cars reports. Volvo is taking orders for the car, which will sell for about $81,000 at current exchange rates. That's about $19,000 more than the regular V60. In countries like France, though, government incentives aimed at boosting electric-drive vehicle sales could shrink that premium to about $10,000.

Volvo unveiled the V60 plug-in at last year's Geneva Motor Show. The car will have a 2.4-liter five-cylinder turbodiesel engine paired with a 70-horsepower electric motor and battery that provides an all-electric range of as much as a 32 miles.

Volvo has said it is investing more than $2 billion in research and development specifically geared towards cutting its vehicles' greenhouse-gas emissions. Last June, Volvo introduced a battery-electric prototype of its C30 that the automaker said would be available for leasing customers by the end of this year. It, too, isn't cheap.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      Rick
      • 1 Day Ago
      With the base V60 model station wagon estate costing $39,448 in the UK, nobody will buy this hybrid? You can buy a BMW 1 Series diesel that returns up to 83 MPG (69 US MPG), BMW 3 Series diesel that retunes up to 80 MPG (66 US MPG), and a BMW 5 Series ($44,385) diesel that returns up to 72 MPG (59 US MPG), why would anybody go for a crappy Volvo hybrid that costs almost double the price of a BMW 5 Series in the UK the choice would be a hard thing BMW 520D diesel or $80,000 Volvo hybrid. Autoblog is right Volvo V60 hybrid is well overpriced, the sales will be close to zero in the UK. Would rather rather buy a Skoda Superb station wagon or Skoda Yeti diesel that are much better than a Volvo or a cheap Pug 3008 diesel hybrid with just comes fully loaded with every gadget these is, with HUD screen display as standard, that cost half the price of the rather empty Volvo over priced hybrid.
        Ford Future
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Rick
        First of all Volvo's are not crappy. Secondly, those cars you mention only get that gas mileage in ideal conditions, on empty highways. Only a hybrid can give you those kind of numbers in city traffic. This is an EREV, where the first 35 miles are electric. Finally, it's a Volvo, the safest car on the planet.
      EZEE
      • 1 Day Ago
      $80,000 Dear Lord! I suppose we got spoiled by the Tesla (Model S) Leaf Focus Volt IMev. All of these other new ones coming out...wow. Now, yes, it is bigger and probably more luxurious than the Volt, but is it twice as good? I seriously doubt that.
        Nick
        • 1 Day Ago
        @EZEE
        The Volt costs a lot more than the $40k in the US.
          marcopolo
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Nick
          @Nick, You are right, in the UK the Volt is $US 52, 000 and the Ampera 10% more. However, the Ampera does have many features the Volt lacks.
        • 1 Day Ago
        @EZEE
        $80k is how much it would cost YOU if YOU were to go to fly to Europe and pay cash today. This doesn't reflect how much it'll impact a European's household budget. For that, you need a Purchase Power Parity comparison. For instance, I can buy a decent fish filet sandwich and fries from an independent restraunt here in the USA for about $6. When I visited the UK in 2007, the same sandwich ("fish and chips) cost about 6 pounds at an independent shop. Also, I looked up the salary of someone in my profession in the UK, and their salary was about the same number of pounds ad I make in dollars. So, my counterpart in the UK can likely afford about as many fish sandwich lunches as I can. BUT, that sandwich cost ME as much as two lunches, because the UK has a stronger currency. And, if my mythical counterpart ere to come to the USA and eat fish sandwiches, it costs HIM half as much. Ain't that screwy? My point is that translating this car's price from Euros into Dollars doesn't really tell us how hard it will be for the average European to afford this car. The article doesn't say what the real price of this car is, but it's probably around 60,000 Euros. But, a base model Ford Kuga (Escape) seems like a reasonable benchmark and costs about 28,000 Euros in France (and is probably about 35k when well optioned), so this car is probably about twice as hard to buy as Ford Escape. So, it *is* an expensive car in France. It's just the author of this article did the readers a disservice by making a bunch of assumptions about international economics that just aren't true[0]. [0] But they could be true if we really had free trade, free markets, free trade, and free/fast shipping+communication worldwide. But we don't have that. What do have fast/free international communication.
      Sasparilla Fizz
      • 1 Day Ago
      The electric motor is 70HP? The regular hybrid Prius, a (just guessing) much lighter vehicle has a 80HP electric motor...that is truly piddly for the size car it is, especially if it is lugging around 32 miles worth of batteries - maybe it drives a bicycle wheel under the middle of the car...just joking. This is an ICE vehicle with a helper electric motor (considering the vehicle's size and the amount of batteries being carried along with it)....how you parlay that into a realistic plug-in vehicle is hard to imagine. Great idea Volvo, but totally unimpressive technical delivery (that's assuming Volvo wanted it to be successful in the first place).
        Chris M
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Sasparilla Fizz
        It may have to call on the IC engine during heavy acceleration, going up steep hills, or other heavy load situations, but for cruising at a steady speed or gradual acceleration, 70 hp may be enough. It will still be able to shut down the IC engine when not needed, thus dramatically improving fuel economy, though perhaps not to the same extent as a PHEV with a more powerful motor. With LiIon batteries, high energy density types have lower peak power, and high peak power types have lower energy density. Volvo may have decided to go with higher energy density battery, sacrificing some power to get lower weight and possibly lower cost for the same "EV range". It's a trade-off that might prove worthwhile.
      PJPHughes1
      • 1 Day Ago
      Remember that this is European pricing. US buyers of European cars get the same car for a much lower price quite often, thanks to lower taxes, VAT, initial price points, etc. I bet this would be a $50K car in the US if it came here.
      EZEE
      • 1 Day Ago
      Dan's Angry Wrath of God Review: :( Diesel :( Light Weight :( Aero :( Cheap :( Performance (One bonus :| for it not being an SUV) Overall Rating, "How odd, the moon is blood red tonight."
      marcopolo
      • 1 Day Ago
      As I said years ago, in theory, this is the equivalent of the most environmentally friendly vehicle operating today. If the only fuel used was suitable produced bio-diesel , and charged from solar, you have a sustainable vehicle. If, not it's just another overpriced hybrid. But, it's important to remember that this type of technology is very interesting to Volvo's PRC parent, 吉利汽車(Geely Holdings) . The PRC has diverted mush of it previous Wind and Solar budget into bio-fuel production. Largely driven by defence demands. With it's massive commitment to Coal and Nuclear electricity generation, and recent set backs in oil resource exploration, diesel-electric is becoming a very viable option. Volvo's R&D and access to Western technology is proving to be a valuable asset it's PRC backers.