The United Auto Workers group isn't backing down on its efforts to unionize the new Volkswagen manufacturing facility in Chattanooga, Tennessee, according to Automotive News. The union is currently asking workers at the facility to sign a petition of support for organization.

The UAW has been meeting informally with workers at the plant for several months, but began handing out authorization cards early this month. Labor laws require a union to submit signature cards from at least 30 percent of the workforce before an election can be held for representation.

Unionizing plants owned by foreign automakers is a necessity for the group's survival moving forward, the UAW reiterates. The union has seen membership decline for the past 30 years, resulting in a financial crisis that's been underscored by the United States recession.

Automotive News reports the UAW has not told Volkswagen of its efforts to unionize the Chattanooga plant. An announcement may come about the program in early April. The plant currently employs more than 2,700 workers.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 90 Comments
      jeepwillyscj2a
      • 2 Years Ago
      Dear UAW, You have already ruined some of my favorite domestic makes. If you would kindly keep your dirty f***ing hands off my favorite Import company. I would greatly appreciate it. Sincerely, me and many other americans
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Chris
        • 2 Years Ago
        The UAW doesn't give a damn about anybody, much less "saving the middle class". They only care about themselves, raking in more dues, regaining some of their former glory. Take a trip to the Detroit area and see for yourself just how much they care about protecting the middle class. Michigan suffers from one of the highest unemployment rates in the country, and two of the states largest cities also just so happen to be two of the nations poorest and most crime-ridden. Don't you find that ironic, while cities such as Atlanta, Charlotte, and Raleigh continue to thrive and attract many former Michiganders?
        batsuichimonji
        • 2 Years Ago
        Right on. Sometimes I think Autoblog trolls the people who have an itchy comment trigger finger. You know what's going to come when you read an article that has "UAW" in it. Even unionized, VW is saving a lot of Geld making cars for the North American market in North America.
        travisjb
        • 2 Years Ago
        I hear you but works councils in Germany is not an argument for labor unions in the U.S. Standards of living include producing cars in the U.S., which we will only do if we are competitive on labor rates, which will we not be if we are unionized. Unions are the beginning of a vicious cycle that leads to a decline in global competitiveness.
          Jerry
          • 2 Years Ago
          @travisjb
          Not more destructive than MBA grads who outsource and layoff on massive scales to get bigger bonuses. The cycle is fed from both ends.
        Danaon
        • 2 Years Ago
        I lived in Germany for several years. Beer vending machines aren't exactly uncommon. Drinking beer isn't thought of the same way in Germany. For example, they were building a new apartment building across the street from where I lived, and about 10 or 11 am every morning the construction workers installing the roof would take a beer break. Anyways, one HUGE difference between US unions and German unions is that German unions actually sit on the board of the companies they work for. This means that the union itself is involved in the actual running of the company. This means that German unions are often much easier to deal with if the company is going through bad times or is uncompetitive, as they see the consequences of their own actions on the company and are responsible for them. Also, German unions don't have ridiculous work rules that lower productivity like the UAW, and they don't protect bad employees either. They're really not comparable. There are unions in the US that work great and that companies generally love to work with, they are skilled trade unions. I live in Texas now and the electrical worker's union is highly sought after and actually difficult to get in to. You have to be a top electrician before they allow you to join, and companies have no problem paying a slightly higher wage for better electricians. At the same time, if you slack off on a job or do bad work, the union will hold you responsible and penalize you or kick you out. Basically, unions that are actually run like a business are successful. Coercive unions (like the UAW) are generally a millstone around the next of the business they work for. But coercive unions pocket a lot more cash (representing workers only costs about 30% of union dues on average) and buy a lot more politicians. In truth the UAW is just using bought and paid for politicians to defend its outdated business model.
          Jerry
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Danaon
          Good call. Many nurses' unions, skilled trade, and operators unions are awesome. They value good workers, despise bad ones, and do their best to defend their trade/customers/patients. Lumping all unions with the UAW is a fallacy and a disservice to a lot of really good people. Its also unfair to lump all UAW workers into the "drunk and disorderly" stereotype. There are really just a few bad apples who make a lot of talented, hard working people look bad. Unfortunately in recent years, those bad apples have been running the UAW. I am saying this as a observer. I am not a union worker.
          Chris
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Danaon
          That's interesting. Thanks. I think it's safe to say the UAW could learn a lot from the unions you described in your post.
        Johannes Wagner
        • 2 Years Ago
        Yes, currently 20,01 % of the VW shares are controlled by the state of lower Saxony. This gives the government a blocking minority when it comes to certain ownership questions. Now for the second part. It is true that all pretty much all parts of business in Germany have union workers. Some may be pretty "militant" compared to your average us union. The union that is responsible for the automotive industry is the IG Metall. Not IT METALL. Also this union is responsible for pretty much all the manufacturing industry in Germany. Not only the automotive industry as you said. And for your comment about beer vending machines: Vending machines that sell alcoholic drinks are illegal in Germany. Mostly because they give easy access to alcohol for underage people. Alcohol on the job is a big No No in Germany. No union could and would protect you, if you'd show up drunk or even slightly intoxicated to your job.
        cowdesigner
        • 2 Years Ago
        I just don't see your point. If the UAW cares about its workers, it should be more flexible in working with the OEMs to create a better environment for its workers. Granted OEMs always raise pay for the execs, but UAW does nothing but ask for more money. And exactly how much of that "more money" benefits UAW more than the workers? I would guess that UAW gets hell lot more than the workers its representing.
        Jerry
        • 2 Years Ago
        Right on Alfonso!
      Chilipepper
      • 2 Years Ago
      The UAW couldn't care less about these workers, they just want their dues.
      caddy-v
      • 2 Years Ago
      Be careful what you ask for. The UAW has no clue how much dental care they'll have to finance down there.
        billfrombuckhead
        • 2 Years Ago
        @caddy-v
        The south has worse healthcare than Cuba. I wonder how much longer union workers live than right to work for less workers.
          - v o c t u s -
          • 2 Years Ago
          @billfrombuckhead
          ^ an often overlooked, fine print amendment to the U.S. constitution
          Basil Exposition
          • 2 Years Ago
          @billfrombuckhead
          Don't like it? GTFO.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @billfrombuckhead
          [blocked]
          Polly Prissy Pants
          • 2 Years Ago
          @billfrombuckhead
          That's what the King told the colonies back in the 1700s. Don't like the rules? GTFO then. Good thing for us they didn't..
          Chris
          • 2 Years Ago
          @billfrombuckhead
          Do you have anything to back that up? That comment reeks of sensationalism. I mean come on!! Cuba? If healthcare there is so great, then why are so many willing to risk so much by floating across over a hundred miles of ocean to get to the US? Miami, which just so happens to be in the South has a very large Cuban community. They also tend to lean more Republican. Can you explain that Bill? Of course you can't.
        Jazz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @caddy-v
        caddy-v, I doubt in the South, the UAW dues will go to pay for the typical Caddy driving UAW worker's gold plated grillz. http://soulja-boy.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/soulja-boy-grillz-02.jpg
      Alan Knutson
      • 2 Years Ago
      Why of course they are... UAW and any union wouldn't miss any opportunity to grow their appetite for more power and greed...
      Luke
      • 2 Years Ago
      "Unionizing plants owned by foreign automakers is a necessity for the group's survival moving forward..." So all we have to do to kill off the union is keep them out of foreign automakers' plants? Where do I sign?
      MONTEGOD7SS
      • 2 Years Ago
      The UAW, in the South, in a right to work state. Aaaaaaahahahaah.
      Gorgenapper
      • 2 Years Ago
      Sneaking in to talk to workers privately and hand out secret password cards? Sounds like shenanigans to me.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        darkness
        • 2 Years Ago
        Because those plants are in slave states and repubican news outlets like Faux would never try to tarnish their breeding ground.
          darkness
          • 2 Years Ago
          @darkness
          Truth sucks dont it.
          darkness
          • 2 Years Ago
          @darkness
          Chris stop stalking me i dont swing that way
          Chris
          • 2 Years Ago
          @darkness
          Exactly, because it's better to work in Michigan... and be a slave to the UAW, the most evil corporation of them all.
          NightFlight
          • 2 Years Ago
          @darkness
          darkness, you too are a clueless troll.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @darkness
          [blocked]
          Jerry
          • 2 Years Ago
          @darkness
          Lol
          Chris
          • 2 Years Ago
          @darkness
          @Alfonso The my point is that the UAW acts like the very thing it was created to protect against. It's more concerned with increasing it's membership and influence more than it is about defending workers' rights. They have proven themselves to be greedy and corrupt. Are those not the factors people rip on corporations for all of the time? No? I also find it funny how you call me uneducated when you support an organization that is no longer needed and has, not only contributed to outsourcing, but also has been a deterrent for other companies setting up operation in Michigan, and thereby creating more jobs. Maybe you should take your own advice, and go back to school. After all, it's not the right to work states that have become the poster-child for economic decline.
        Chris
        • 2 Years Ago
        Sorry if I got your hopes up darkness, but that's not my thing. All kidding aside, if the people of Michigan continue to keep their head in the sand like they have the last half century, then they will continue to watch their state decline. Not even your Messiah Obama can change that, no matter how hard he tries.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Gorgenapper
      • 2 Years Ago
      Looks like the parasite is seeking a new host.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
    • Load More Comments