The Michigan State Police have officially graced the Ford Police Interceptor line with a Pursuit-Rated designation after a volley of tests. Both the Interceptor Sedan and Utility withstood the organization's battery of 0-60, braking and handling evaluations over a period of two days. And, the results?

According to Ford, both vehicles offer increased fuel economy and performance compared to the outgoing Crown Victoria Police Interceptor thanks to the use of the company's 3.5-liter turbocharged Ecoboost V6. With 365 horsepower and 350 pound-feet of torque, the engine offers more grunt than the old 4.6-liter V8 with a smaller appetite for fuel.

The addition of a larger alternator and radiator means that the forced-induction six-pot can now handle the abuse that patrol duty can wreak on a vehicle. In addition, Ford says that its offerings are the only law-enforcement-specification options on the market right now specifically engineered to protect occupants from a 75 mph rear-end collision.

While both the Sedan and Utility have received the thumbs up from the Mitten State, the Los Angeles Police Department will also put the vehicles through the ringer in November. Hit the jump for the full press release.
Show full PR text
New Ford Police Interceptors Validated as Pursuit-Rated in Tests Conducted by the Michigan State Police

The all-new Ford Police Interceptors deliver more performance, handling and fuel economy

The only all-wheel-drive vehicles specifically built for law enforcement, the Police Interceptors meet stringent law enforcement standards

Now police departments and other law enforcement agencies can get an all-new, American-made vehicle with the expected durability and price of the popular Crown Victoria

Ford Police Interceptor Utility expands ability for law enforcement to get the job done efficiently and effectively

Dearborn, Mich., Sept. 20, 2011 – The 2013 Ford Police Interceptor Sedan and Utility today passed stringent Michigan State Police tests and have proven they are ready for law enforcement use. Of special note was the performance of the Police Interceptor Utility, which not only outperformed the Chevrolet Tahoe but held its own amongst the sedans.

The Ford Police Interceptor Utility excelled in 0-60 acceleration, braking, and handling over the two day testing.

"We are pleased that the performance of the Police Interceptor Utility was validated because it provides more choice for law enforcement agencies," said Lisa Teed, Ford's marketing manager for the Police Interceptors. "They can be assured that whether in slippery conditions like snow or in pursuit situations the purpose-built Utility will deliver."

Building on more than 15 years of leadership Ford has taken the key product attributes that made Crown Victoria Police Interceptor the leading law enforcement vehicle and increased the next-generation products' capabilities including offering the first and only pursuit-rated all-wheel-drive police vehicles. Now police departments and other law enforcement agencies can get an all-new, American-made vehicle with the same durability and price range of the popular Crown Victoria. The new Police Interceptors will be built at Ford's Chicago Assembly Plant.

Working with Ford's Police Advisory Board, consisting of law enforcement professionals from the United States and Canada who provided feedback on attributes such as safety, performance, durability, driver comfort and functionality. Ford has ensured that the new Police Interceptors are purpose-built to meet the requirements of this demanding industry.

"Our experience with the Crown Victoria helped us develop the next generation of Police Interceptor vehicles that serve as tools for public safety officials to do their jobs safely, efficiently and effectively," added Teed.

Officer protection is the first priority. The Ford Police Interceptors are the only vehicles certified to pass 75 mph rear collisions. Ballistic door panels to protect from gunshots are available on the driver or passenger doors. Safety cell construction helps direct the force of a collision around the occupant compartment. Crumple zones help absorb and dissipate the energy of a crash.

Power and efficiency

The V6 powertrain portfolio of engines on the Police Interceptors provides the fuel efficiency improvement to assist government agencies in reducing their operating costs. More importantly, the smaller-displacement engines provide increased performance and capability when compared to the Crown Victoria Police Interceptor (CVPI) 4.6-liter V8. The highly efficient 3.5-liter V6 engine delivers at least 280 horsepower in the Sedan. An all-new EcoBoost® V6 twin-turbocharged, direct-injection engine is also available producing 365 horsepower and 350 lb.-ft. of torque.

"This week's testing by the Michigan State Police proves our powerful and efficient V6 powertrains exceed CVPI V8 performance and deliver savings back to government agencies," said Bill Gubing, chief engineer of the Ford Police Program. "Government agencies have been seeking money saving solutions. Increased performance and improved fuel economy deliver on our commitment. In addition, engineering common components between the Sedan and Utility, and upfit-friendly solutions will aid the fleet's maintenance. Our goal was to streamline and reduce complexity for the customer, whose resources are constrained in these economic times."

Managing increased power, requires more stopping power. New 18-inch five-spoke steel wheels and tires are designed to work in concert with the new brake system for improved capability. Additional unique components include a larger heavy-duty alternator and larger radiator. A honeycomb grille provides increased airflow throughout the vehicle to improve cooling and enhance operation.

Rigorous testing was conducted to ensure the new Police Interceptors could handle the demands of around-the-clock law enforcement duty. In addition to the certification testing designed by the Michigan State Police, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department will conduct its vehicle tests in November to further evaluate the durability and capability of police vehicles under the most extreme conditions.

The pursuit-rated Ford Police Interceptors come standard with all-wheel-drive. The Sedan is available with a 3.5-liter Ti-VCT flex-fuel V6 or 3.5-liter EcoBoost™ V6 engine. The Utility has 3.7-liter Ti-VCT flex-fuel V6 engine producing 300 hp. Front-wheel-drive configuration is optional.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 52 Comments
      Ashton
      • 3 Years Ago
      Its looks nice, as long as it's never behind me..... What's the sticker price?
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Ashton
        [blocked]
          Dean Hammond
          • 3 Years Ago
          rubbish.....you obviously know nothing about Government concessions....
      Shane Conger
      • 3 Years Ago
      Belive me, one winter in the AWD and they will forget FWD and RWD.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Shane Conger
        [blocked]
          Elmo
          • 3 Years Ago
          And yet, they both still suck royally with snow tires.
      EJD1984
      • 3 Years Ago
      General Motors Company : Chevrolet Trio Lead at Michigan State Police Tests http://www.4-traders.com/GENERAL-MOTORS-COMPANY-6873535/news/GENERAL-MOTORS-COMPANY-Chevrolet-Trio-Lead-at-Michigan-State-Police-Tests-13807350/
      Adrian
      • 3 Years Ago
      Good news. The Crown Vic, while durable and cheap to maintain, had several crash issues. No officer should be put at risk of injury at the fault of their vehicle's design, so hopefully we start to see these more sophisticated vehicles get in police departments soon.
        NightFlight
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Adrian
        Exactly what issues did they have? They were the ___ONLY___ police car to pass the 75MPH rear end collision test. Crown Vics were very safe...
          mitchman06
          • 3 Years Ago
          @NightFlight
          @ Adrian BOOOOOOOOOOOM! headshot!!!! you just got schooled in a big way! lol
          NightFlight
          • 3 Years Ago
          @NightFlight
          @ Adrian Maybe YOU are the one that should do more research on the issue. Those fires from the rear end collisions were PROVEN that they weren't the fault of FoMoCo. Outfitters, and installers who installed gear trays/dividers/electronics packages in the trunks were using inappropriate hardward that penetrated into the fuel tank and caused ruptures. Basically, they used screws that were far too long and drilled into the tank. Ford resolved the issue by installing plates that didn't allow moronic outfitters to make mistakes such as that. The problem was next to nil without outfitters messing with the vehicle, but after they made modifications the probability went up. "Due to the gas tank's orientation, drilling through the package tray may result in drilling into the gas tank. Installers also used screws set directly into the bulkhead and facing the fuel tank. In the event of a high-energy collision, these screws could be forced into the tank, both rupturing the tank and possibly acting as a spark source. Long bolts for mounting heavier equipment were also directly suspect. The manufacturer provided an aftermarket shield to help prevent these items from puncturing the tank during impact. Further, many investigations, both performed by federal/state agencies, and the police department themselves, have found that removable items in the trunk were improperly stowed. These items became tank-piercing projectiles during the rear-collision scenarios. Ford's second solution came in the form of a recall kit including patterns to mark unsafe areas (to drill) in the luggage compartment. Also included were rubberized kevlar and hard ballistic nylon shields for the differential cover lower shock bolts. They also included a kevlar-based trunk liner........" Guess you didn't do a simple Google search yourself.
          Adrian
          • 3 Years Ago
          @NightFlight
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Crown_Victoria_Police_Interceptor#Problems_and_criticism Perhaps you should do a simple Google search before asking. There are many more articles besides just the generic Wikipedia one that describe it in more detail. I don't understand the devout fanbase for this car.....it's an old, tired platform. While it is REALLY durable and cheap for departments to fix, no one can say these were the safest cars for police officers.
          Adrian
          • 3 Years Ago
          @NightFlight
          Those are still issues, regardless of it's Ford's fault or the accessory installer. The new Police Interceptor comes with many of those components standard or with factory-designed installation modules. Regardless of the fact I disagree with you on this one, NightFlight, at least you're always educated and thorough in your response.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      mylz
      • 3 Years Ago
      just wait for the turbos to fail. turbo in a police vehicle is sooooo stupid just like putting a v6 turbo in a pos f150
        Dean Hammond
        • 3 Years Ago
        @mylz
        proof please....
        Elmo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @mylz
        Didn't I already go over this with you? Well over 150,000 miles on one EcoBoost V6. Torn down at last year's SEMA, resulting in absolutely no wear and tear on the engine. Please, quit being a troll.
          Dean Hammond
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Elmo
          tool is the actual word....
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Elmo
          [blocked]
        tkosoccer03
        • 3 Years Ago
        @mylz
        ya that F150 with those turbos pulled 11,000 pounds at full fuckin throttle for 24 hours straight....
      mikemaj82
      • 3 Years Ago
      caprice please!
      GLHS837
      • 3 Years Ago
      Hmmm, I love the wording of the press release, its finely crafted. A few points. 1. You can indeed get a new Ford PI sedan for about the same money as the CVPI, but it carefully does NOT say you get the 355hp version for that. Wonder how much that drivetrain costs. In a Taurus, thats about 40K. Oh, and prices for police cars are easy to find if you look, most places, budgetary stuff is online, and you can see what the bid price of the different cars is. Generally, 22-24K for a car, with about 20K or so upfit. 2. They mention it outperformed the CVPI, but make no mention of how it performed against the Caprice and the Charger. Heck, the V^ charger outperformed the CVPI:) 3. Wanna bet the 2013 versions of the Caprice and Charger get 75mph rear impact rated also? I know the Charger is 55mpg rear impact rated. I really thing cost is going to kill this thing as the standard cop car, at least for rural and highway patrols. City departments might buy the V-6s, but thats a tough craowd there.
      Mark
      • 3 Years Ago
      cops driving FWD cars...it's just not right. (I know, I know, Impalas are FWD). The whole world is going to mamby pamby land.
        Dean Hammond
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Mark
        um, the Taurus is also available in AWD, along with 365 hp...is that good enough for you...probably superior to RWD in inclement conditions to boot....
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Mark
        [blocked]
          Justin Campanale
          • 3 Years Ago
          *he* Would it kill AB to add an edit button?
          NightFlight
          • 3 Years Ago
          That's a flat out disgusting racist comment. Reported.
          Krishan Mistry
          • 3 Years Ago
          Wow, really outdid yourself there. Segregation is dead, like it or not, if you have a problem with someone's race, you really have a problem with you yourself being a racist pighead.
          Nick Bezy
          • 3 Years Ago
          Don't listen to that guy, it's not racist. You're simply stating a changing of the times and everything that comes along with it whether it be technology or culture.
          WillieD
          • 3 Years Ago
          What?
          imoore
          • 3 Years Ago
          If your comment was intended to be funny or sarcastic, it didn't work. Fool.
          Justin
          • 3 Years Ago
          He's half white
      creamwobbly
      • 3 Years Ago
      That's "through the wringer", as in through your great-grandmother's laundry dryer. What's a "ringer"? A telephone?
      Anastasios Nedelkos
      • 3 Years Ago
      Uh. One problem I see is this that GM posted on their site for 2012 MY cop cars. http://media.gm.com/content/media/us/en/gm/news.detail.html/content/Pages/news/us/en/2011/Sep/0921_police_ppv
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
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