• Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
  • Image Credit: Jonathon Ramsey
Volkswagen is finding rapid success in the battery electric vehicle market; especially in Europe where the e-Golf is already the segment sales leader. Recent concepts like the C Coupe GTE, Sport Coupe GTE and Cross Coupe GTE suggest more plug-in hybrids from the company are on the way, too. To make future models more economical, the German automotive giant is considering switching to a standard design for its lithium-ion battery cells.

Using standardized parts is a long-accepted principle in production because it leads to economies of scale, and a company can pass on the savings to buyers or pocket the money to boost profits. VW is aiming for a massive 66-percent drop in costs by switching to a unified design, according to Heinz-Jakob Neusser, the board member in charge of development, to Automotive News. While the cells would be uniform, they could be crafted into different modules to fit each specific model.

VW currently buys cells from Panasonic and Samsung for various models, but under the new plan all of the automaker's brands would switch to a single one. "We have a clear understanding in the group of a common cell," Neusser said, according to Automotive News, without suggesting when a change might happen.

VW also has a few months decide on a different future for its EVs. The automaker is reportedly considering whether to use sold-state lithium-ion batteries from a US-based supplier for upcoming models. The next-gen tech could potentially give a massive boost in range while also being fireproof.


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