Once again, the most American car on the market is from an American brand. The Ford F-150 retained its number one spot in Cars.com's annual survey of the most American vehicles, trumping the Toyota Camry, which remains at number two.

Ford taking the top spot is small consolation, though, as the Detroit Three aren't too well represented here. General Motors scored a win at number seven, with the Chevrolet Corvette, while Chrysler squeaked in at number ten, with the Dodge Viper. Outside of those three vehicles, Toyota and Honda dominate the top ten.

What's most remarkable, though, is that there were so few cars available for this year's list.

"Only ten cars were eligible for the American-Made Index this year. That's the fewest in the study's nine-year history. In 2013, 14 cars met the threshold, 20 in 2012 and 30 cars the year before that," said Patrick Olsen, Editor-In-Chief of Cars.com. "This consistent decline points to global nature of cars these days. Production in the US is up, but parts are coming from all over the world, making the notion of classifying cars as 'American' more difficult than ever."

In addition to the smaller batch of cars, the bottom four (Corvette, Honda Ridgeline, Honda Crosstour and Viper) are all first timers for the Most American study.

How did these results develop, though? Well, in addition to their final assembly location, Cars.com takes into account parts content, eliminating cars with a parts distribution below 75 percent American. All cars must be built in the US, while discontinued models need to have a US-built successor heading to market.

Take a look below for the full press release and list of winners from Cars.com.
Show full PR text
Ford F-150 Ranks "Most American" In Annual Cars.com American-Made Index
Fewest Cars Eligible in Index's Nine-Year History

CHICAGO, June 30, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Cars.com, the premier online resource for buying and selling new and used cars, today released its annual American-Made Index, with the Ford F-150 taking the top spot for the second year in a row. The ranking takes into account three factors to determine how "American" cars are, including domestic-parts content[1] (percentage of a vehicle's parts considered to be "domestic," meaning built in the U.S. or Canada), final assembly point, and overall vehicle sales.

"We uncovered a pretty remarkable phenomenon when compiling this year's list," said Patrick Olsen, Cars.com Editor-in-Chief. "Only 10 cars were eligible for the American-Made Index this year. That's the fewest in the study's nine-year history. In 2013, 14 cars met the threshold, 20 in 2012 and 30 cars the year before that. This consistent decline points to global nature of cars these days. Production in the U.S. is up, but parts are coming from all over the world, making the notion of classifying cars as 'American' more difficult than ever."

While the top two spots on the index remain the same from previous years, the bottom of the list introduces four models that are first-timers to the Index. Additionally, this year's index leans heavily towards foreign automakers, which fill seven of the top 10 spots.

"This is a drastic shift from the past," said Olsen. "For several years, there was a pretty even split between domestic and foreign automakers on the list. For the past two years, three GM crossovers made up about 30 percent of the list, however they've dropped below the requisite domestic parts content and, as a result, Toyota and Honda really dominate."
Rank Make/Model Manufacturer U.S. Assembly Location(s) Rank in 2013
1 Ford F-150 Ford Dearborn, Mich.; Claycomo, Mo. 1
2 Toyota Camry Toyota Georgetown, Ky.; Lafayette, Ind. 2
3 Honda Odyssey Honda Lincoln, Ala. 4
4 Toyota Sienna Toyota Princeton, Ind. 5
5 Toyota Tundra Toyota San Antonio, Texas 7
6 Toyota Avalon Toyota Georgetown, Ky. 10
7 Chevrolet Corvette General Motors Bowling Green, Ky. -
8 Honda Ridgeline Honda Lincoln, Ala. -
9 Honda Crosstour Honda East Liberty, Ohio -
10 Dodge SRT Viper Chrysler Detroit, Mich. -

"The top spot on the American-Made Index has gone back and forth between the Ford F-150 and Toyota Camry for several years," said Olsen. "This year's ranking showed little change to the top of the list with the F-150 and Camry continuing to take the top spots thanks to strong sales for both models and no change in their domestic-parts content. This is the second year in a row that the F-150 is being considered the 'Most American' vehicle and its fifth time in the number one spot since the index was created nine years ago."

For full results, additional content and more information about the 2014 American-Made Index, visit www.cars.com or blogs.cars.com.

ABOUT THE AMERICAN-MADE INDEX

Cars.com's American-Made Index rates vehicles built and bought in the U.S. Factors include the percentage of parts considered domestic under federal regulations, whether the car is assembled in the U.S. and U.S. sales. We disqualify models with a domestic parts content rating below 75 percent, models built exclusively outside the U.S. or models soon to be discontinued without a U.S.-built successor.

ABOUT CARS.COM

Cars.com is an award-recognized online destination for car shoppers that offers information from experts and consumers to help buyers formulate opinions on what to buy, where to buy and how much to pay for a car. Cars.com offers thousands of new and used vehicle listings, expert and consumer reviews, side-by-side comparison and build and price tools, photo galleries, videos, unbiased editorial content and many other resources. As the 2013 "Highest Ranked Third-Party Automotive Mobile Site" by J.D. Power, Cars.com puts millions of car buyers in control of their shopping process with the information they need to make stress-free buying decisions. Launched in June 1998, Cars.com is a division of Classified Ventures LLC, which is owned by leading media companies, including A.H. Belo (NYSE: AHC), Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE: GCI), The McClatchy Company (NYSE: MNI), Tribune Company (OTC:TRBAA) and The Washington Post Company (NYSE: WPO).


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  • 33 Comments
      bjtarps
      • 5 Months Ago
      The Camry is ASSEMBLED in America, using most all of it's parts MADE in Japan. Plus the fact that the JAPAN'S GDP is the winner not the U.S. whenall's said and done.
        clquake
        • 5 Months Ago
        @bjtarps
        What part of "North American Content" confuses you?
          1454
          • 5 Months Ago
          @clquake
          It's probably the fact that it's not listed as "US of A" or " 'Merica". Had it been listed like that, then he might not have been so confused.
      brandon
      • 5 Months Ago
      But, but, but, if we hadn't "saved"(wasted money on) GM then 'Merica would have lost it entire automotive manufacturing base and suppliers. /s :rollseyes:
        laguy19
        • 5 Months Ago
        @brandon
        Disgrace to the Brandon name.
          brandon
          • 5 Months Ago
          @laguy19
          Why, because you can't stand that your precious GM is just a POS, as evidenced by recent findings? Notice, Toyota, which I don't even like, or drive, was raked over the coals for the "sudden acceleration" BS that *no one* could ever prove actually happened. Where, GM has demonstrated fraud and yet they are "forgiven" just for being " "merican". You are a disgrace to humanity.
      mary.keana
      • 5 Months Ago
      So 8 out of 10 vehicles are from foreign brands, and MOST American.
      BipDBo
      • 5 Months Ago
      This survey, as I understand does not take into account the locations f the R&D nor the headquarters. This is a very significant omission economically, because these jobs have the highest income, highest tax and require highest education, so per job, they make the biggest impact on an economy. It is therefore slanted to show foreign brands as more domestic than they actually are. The shift to having less and less "American cars" seems to be because cheap labor from poorer countries like Mexico and China is driving more and more parts manufacturing overseas, but just the final assembly is kept within the US, likely to save $ on tax and shipping.
        Odeen
        • 5 Months Ago
        @BipDBo
        The only reason why less R&D is not done in America is because American cars abide by a different set of rules. It is well known that some big American companies are recruiting talent from other parts of the globe to spice things up. Not that there aren't many talented minds working in America. Just to say that it wouldn't affect this survey as much as you think it would.
      billfrombuckhead
      • 5 Months Ago
      Struggling "cars.com" (desperate for revenue as Auto Trader and Craigslist eats it's lunch) has the credibility of the automotive dealer advertisement they run. Other surveys have the JapanInc and KoreaInc cars much lower in domestic content when R&D, administrative work, suppliers and other factors are weighed in.
        brandon
        • 5 Months Ago
        @billfrombuckhead
        Oh yeah, we are going to take a GM apologist seriously. Don't be mad that Japan/Korea/anywhereelse inc. builds better cars than Detroitinc.
        lne937s
        • 5 Months Ago
        @billfrombuckhead
        It is really not a "survey". They combine "domestic" parts content (which can be US or Canada due to lobbying from certain automakers from a certain city across a bridge from Canada) and US assembly, with a minimum number of vehicles sold. Basically they just plug in NHTSA AALA data, apply some rules, and bring up the list. The lists that state the foreign brands are lower, like Kogod, award points heavily to where the global headquarters is, which naturally shifts the results.
      b.rn
      • 5 Months Ago
      Everyone that releases these kinds of things, has a completely different list. Which one should I believe?
        Alfonso T. Alvarez
        • 5 Months Ago
        @b.rn
        Well, the truth is in the old saying: 'figures don't lie, but liars can figure' See my other post for clarification.
        yonomo200
        • 5 Months Ago
        @b.rn
        They're all likely true. It's just a matter of grabbing the statistics the assembler of the list wants you to see. Pay attention to how they word what they're saying.
      Alfonso T. Alvarez
      • 5 Months Ago
      Ah yes, the annual attempt by cars.com to make themselves seem 'relevant'. To bad the industry knows better than to believe their contrived numbers. The main issues I have with their 'survey' are: They use a 'fudge factor' for calculating their end number - i.e., they see the content that the OEM claims, then use a multiplier based on the number of vehicles produced of that model. That is just plain wrong - NO statistician would do something like this. They completely ignore where the majority of components that make up a 'made in America' assembly are sourced from. Say the OEM claim the instrument cluster, infotainment system, heating/ventilating/air conditioning systems are 100% made in America because that is where the final assembly is done. This is not only impossible, as many of the components are not even made here, but most of the higher cost sub-assemblies are sourced from lower cost countries. The other flaw is that the scope is limited - who cares where the final assembly is done in the bigger picture, what matters is where are the high paying, highly skilled jobs that are drivers of our economy being done? European OEM's do virtually all of their engineering in Europe, same with Japanese and Korean OEM's. They have technical centers here, sure, but that is to 'federalize' foreign designs to meet our market needs/wants and requirements. Chrysler, Ford and GM EACH have more engineers working in US engineering positions than all of the foreign based OEM's combined.
      DKano
      • 5 Months Ago
      I'm not a truck guy, so I'm the proud owner of the No. 2 Most American Car.
      Bob
      • 5 Months Ago
      Overall though the traditional Big 3 still have more cars on the AALA list where the majority of cars are assembled in the US with North American parts. If you looked at the overall supply chains of the entire companies and how many they employ in the US total, the American companies still come out on top. Still good we have the imports employing people though.
      yonomo200
      • 5 Months Ago
      Much of the list is dominated by cars nobody buys. Take a look at the most American brands by sales, and the most American brands by lineups, and suddenly the picture takes on a totally different hue.
      That Guy
      • 5 Months Ago
      The F150 is not a car...
      Avinash Machado
      • 5 Months Ago
      The Crosstour hardly sells.
        yonomo200
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Avinash Machado
        I saw one yesterday, for the first time in months. Absolutely hideous!
        carguy1701
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Avinash Machado
        True dat. I really don't know what Honda was thinking. Should have just built an Accord wagon and called it such.
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