• Image Credit: Infiniti
  • Image Credit: Infiniti
  • Image Credit: Infiniti
  • Image Credit: Infiniti
  • Image Credit: Infiniti
  • Image Credit: Infiniti
  • Image Credit: Infiniti
  • Image Credit: Infiniti
  • Image Credit: Infiniti
When most luxury automakers started getting into SUVs and crossovers, they started at with the largest models, but have gradually been getting smaller. Think Lexus and the LX, Audi and the Q7, or BMW and the X5, and you'll see what we mean, because each of them has been steadily downsizing its crossovers ever since. But Infiniti is going even smaller. At least, in China, anyway.

That's where the luxury marque from Nissan will soon be offering the new Infiniti ESQ. The smallest of Infiniti crossovers has been developed in China, exclusively for the Chinese market to meet Chinese tastes. It shares its underpinnings with the Nissan Juke, but instead of starting with the base model, Infiniti China has started with the more potent Juke Nismo – complete with 1.6-liter turbo four producing 197 horsepower – and added on premium accoutrements. The exterior that appears to be differentiated by a new grille and wheels, featuring the ESQ logo instead of Infiniti's, but the same quirky styling that sets the Juke apart. Though all we can of the interior is the steering wheel, you can bet that Infiniti gave the ESQ a more luxurious cabin space, too.

Infiniti's global communications manager Stefan Wienmann told Autoblog that the company is "expanding [its] portfolio not only globally but also specifically in China," adding the ESQ to a market-specific lineup that includes long-wheelbase versions of the Q50 sedan and QX50 crossover. "We see specific sales opportunities in this segment," explains Wienmann, adding that a targeted project like the ESQ "also enables us to gain experience in positioning a new premium model to the 'new millennials', a customer group that is very important to us."

Does that mean we might expect similar but different products launched in other markets like our own?

"We don't have any specific plans for other models targeted at specific countries or regions," Wienmann told us. "That said, we will always look at opportunities to expand our portfolio in the future and if we see such an opportunity, we would be ready to grasp it."


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  • 22 Comments
      Cruising
      • 10 Months Ago
      I love the Juke as a Nissan it's odd seeing it under the Infiniti branding. They would have been better off using the platform and styling a smaller looking FX/QX70. Oh well, can't wait till we get the Q30.
      Adam B.
      • 10 Months Ago
      I own a '11 Juke SL, I love simply love it, it has great handling and when it is set to "sport," the shift points (yes I know it is simulated) are right on, it holds on to the "gears" extremely well. Efficiency is not all that good avg 25-27mpg combined, but I do keep it in "sport" more often than I should. So here is the thing... Is the Juke an odd looking car? Definitely. Why does Nissan still sell it? Because it sells. Why does it sell? For some it may be the way it looks, I think most because the way it drives. Why did you buy one? Great drive, nice packaging (fully loaded in 2011 26k) Looks. My gripe... people complain about the Camry / Accord for blandness, however criticize boldness.
      Winnie Jenkems
      • 10 Months Ago
      They can package it up with all the leather and tech they can squeeze in the thing, but none of that will change the fact that it's one of the ugliest vehicles on the road today. Should do well in China.
      Teleny411
      • 10 Months Ago
      What has China done to deserve the Juke????
      Agustin
      • 10 Months Ago
      Shuold be name Ugly Frog
      Daniel
      • 10 Months Ago
      Proof that the Chinese are suckers for anything foreign.
      bofdem
      • 10 Months Ago
      Why in God's name did they not replace the whole front end? What a disaster in badge engineering.
        Lantern42
        • 10 Months Ago
        @bofdem
        It's not such a disaster, since the Juke isn't sold in the Chinese market it won't be an issue.
      DucatiCorse
      • 10 Months Ago
      Every time I see a Juke, I am reminded of those engineers who shoved the heart and driveline of a GTR down its quirky, intriguing gullet. The pure insanity makes me want to high-five it.
      MayTheBestCarWin05
      • 10 Months Ago
      Okay. Question. Am I the only one who thinks that Nissan just can't make a good looking steering wheel to save it's life?
        VTEC kicked in bro
        • 10 Months Ago
        @MayTheBestCarWin05
        Nissan wheels always look like they have a few buttons missing.
        bofdem
        • 10 Months Ago
        @MayTheBestCarWin05
        GT-R has a nice wheel. Not as nice as my BMW (2013 5-series M-Sport wheel), but it's pretty solid.
      drew
      • 10 Months Ago
      Secretly, I think this is kind of awesome.
      Avinash Machado
      • 10 Months Ago
      Ugh.
      herrstreet
      • 10 Months Ago
      If the Cheshire Cat were a car...
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