tesla supercharger station
  • tesla supercharger station
  • tesla supercharger station
  • Tesla Supercharger
  • Tesla Supercharger

  • telsa model s supercharging
  • telsa model s supercharging

  • Tesla Motors Supercharger
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
  • tesla supercharger station map 2015
  • tesla supercharger station map
  • Tesla Supercharger initial locations map
  • Tesla Supercharger initial locations map

  • Tesla Motors Supercharger Europe January 2014
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
  • Image Credit: Tesla Motors
The votes are in, the ballots have been counted and the envelope is open. Together with our partners at AOL Autos, we're proud to announce the winner of our second annual Technology of the Year award. After having awarded the inaugural prize last year to Chrysler for its UConnect infotainment system, this year we've selected the Tesla Supercharger network as the top technological advancement in the automotive industry.

While enthusiasts will likely associate the name "supercharger" with forced induction, Tesla has successfully redefined the term to apply to its increasingly sprawling network of charging stations across the country. Drive your Model S up to one of the 54 such stations in the United States, and you can be on your way with a half charge in just 20 minutes, instead of the full eight hours it usually takes. With much of the industry and government still wringing its hands over a lack of infrastructure for alternative fuels, Tesla has taken the reins and is working to fix the problem itself.

The winner was selected from a compelling list of candidates by a jury including editors from AOL Autos, Autoblog, AutoblogGreen, Translogic and even Engadget. The Tesla Supercharger beat out such contenders as Chevy's MyLink Valet Mode, Infiniti Backup Collision Intervention, Volvo Pedestrian and Cyclist Detection, Mopar In-Vehicle Wireless Charging and Mercedes-Benz Intelligent Drive to claim the hardware, which was presented at this week's CES show in Las Vegas.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 59 Comments
      i.own.your.ass
      • 1 Year Ago
      bailout in 5,4,3,2,1 year
        Grendal
        • 1 Year Ago
        @i.own.your.ass
        You're still a cowardly troll. No references, no justification, no facts, just fear, uncertainty, and doubt.
          Grendal
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          Not true. Any proof? Any reasoning? Any form of thinking at all?
          Grendal
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          To follow up with the point that EA made. Tesla owners are the salespeople. The average owner is so happy with their car they typically sell 2 to 5 cars just by talking about it. One guy said he had sold over 25 cars altogether. That's how great the car is.
          Grendal
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          Except the owners don't make a cent for doing it. They just love their cars that much. They recognize the car is a significant improvement over what they had before. That was mostly luxury cars like Mercs, BMW's, Infiniti's, Lexus, Jaguars, and Cadillac's. It would be a Ponzi scheme if what they made was BS, this is clearly not that. http://www.autoblog.com/2013/11/21/tesla-model-s-tops-consumer-reports-annual-satisfaction-ratings/ 99 out of 100 people say they would buy the car again. Got anything else troll? Did you ever drive the car? No. So that means that your hatred is just uniformed and spiteful BS.
          ElectricAvenue
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          "and right". Uh huh. That would be why Tesla continues to deliver Model Ss at the rate of at least 20,000 per year while spending nothing on advertising. Yup. Clearly this company is in trouble.
          i.own.your.ass
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          perfect setup for ponzi scheme
        jeff
        • 1 Year Ago
        @i.own.your.ass
        Tesla is the ONLY automotive to pay back their government Loan.... End of discussion....
          i.own.your.ass
          • 1 Year Ago
          @jeff
          wow....that's just sad......to pay back gov loan is now an achievement by American standard
      i.own.your.ass
      • 1 Year Ago
      fire hazard!
        ElectricAvenue
        • 1 Year Ago
        @i.own.your.ass
        Three Tesla Model S fires. The passenger compartment was not involved in any of the three fires. Versus http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-911-technical-forum/263761-porsche-fire-hazard-statistics.html http://jalopnik.com/5979311/audi-r8-consumed-by-spectacular-fire-during-car-show-in-mumbai http://www.motorauthority.com/news/1077316_audi-r8-catches-fire-in-toronto-video http://thesupercarkids.com/audi-r8-spyder-catches-fire-during-wedding/ http://bmwproblems.wordpress.com http://www.mercurynews.com/california/ci_24841409/paul-walker-coroner-report-fast-and-furious-actor http://www.carsguide.com.au/news-and-reviews/car-news/land_rover_jaguar_and_bmw_recall_8000_diesels_over_fire_risk http://www.hulldailymail.co.uk/Dramatic-BMW-car-Swanland/story-20257838-detail/story.html http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/26/bmw-recall-1-million-cars-defect-cause-fires_n_1380408.html http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9xmp9wcrrw http://www.examiner.com/article/bmw-m3-catches-on-fire-parking-lot http://www.autoblog.com/2012/12/12/mercedes-benz-recalling-5-800-vehicles-over-potential-fires/ http://www.carscoops.com/2013/12/nhtsa-upgrades-fire-probe-on-253000.html http://www.nbcnews.com/business/mercedes-recalls-5-800-vehicles-due-fire-risk-1C7590179 etc... Estimated 150,000 vehicle fires per year. http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/vehicles
        thomas.leopard
        • 1 Year Ago
        @i.own.your.ass
        Yeah, gasoline isnt a fire hazard at all!
        Grendal
        • 1 Year Ago
        @i.own.your.ass
        Cowardly Troll!
      usa1
      • 1 Year Ago
      A propriety set of electrical charging stations for use by small niche of buyers is the best innovation in 2013? Bad year I guess.
        jeff
        • 1 Year Ago
        @usa1
        Tesla can always licenses their technology so it will MOST LIKELY become the level 3 standard.... Build it and they will come...
        Grendal
        • 1 Year Ago
        @usa1
        Game changing innovation? Yes. New technology? Yes. Technology that will be adopted and copied by others? Yes.
        ElectricAvenue
        • 1 Year Ago
        @usa1
        I am normally opposed to a manufacturer devising their own standard, but in this case Tesla had no choice. At the time there was - SAE J1772, allows charging at up to 80 A @ 240V (19.2 kW) - CHAdeMO, which uses a HUGE connector, allows charging at up to 50 kW There are very few CHAdeMO stations outside of Japan. (The Pacific Northwest being the main exception). Instead, Tesla designed a connector which is way smaller than CHAdeMO, actually even smaller than J1772, yet allows charging at up to 120 kW. Then they went out and started installing charging stations in the real world. While everyone else waited for something to happen, or used the unavailability of high-power charging as an excuse for limiting electric vehicles to city use, Tesla just made it happen. So... yes, it's Tesla-only. They did everything themselves. Maybe some day other manufacturers will get serious about competing.
          Thereminator
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ElectricAvenue
          Tesla...SpacX...SolarCity. Elon tends to make his own standards without waiting for approval. At certain infrequent times in our history...Individualism isn't considered a novel character aspect.
        Nick Kordich
        • 1 Year Ago
        @usa1
        @usa1 - Three years after starting his electric lighting company, Thomas Edison had less than 60 homes using electric light. 20 years after that, only 3% of American homes had electric light. Surely the light bulb would have been "tech of the year" at some point (though in this case it's just automotive tech). 20 years after Benz first began producing cars with internal combustion engines, electric cars still outsold ICE ones: they were quieter, safer, and more reliable. Electric car sales only peaked and started to decline in the 1920s. ICE vehicles had been outselling electrics, but in terms of their own market, electrics had been growing up until that point. Mass production of ICE cars helped drop the price, but you also had leaded gas and greatly improved roads thanks to automated roadlaying equipment. It was only with long range travel by ICE becoming so practical that ICEs finally resulted in a decline in the original electrics. The Supercharger network is a year and a half old, and now allows you to drive an electric car from Mexico to Canada or Miami to Boston in about the same amount of time as it takes to drive in an ICE. Once chain of chargers between LA and New York should be complete in the next couple of weeks, which should allow travel from coast to coast along one route, while deployment should continue to allow alternate routes and access between other cities. Would the first light bulb or Atkinson cycle engine have merited "tech of the year" when they would have needed another 20+ years to become dominant? Or did the importance for having a production version of a concept people had been working at for years or the creation of long distance travel using a technology that's superior to what came before sufficient? What car technology would you have chosen? If this was a bad year, what would you have chosen from last year? Last year's winner was Chrysler's UConnect - not exactly a game-changer in my opinion: http://www.autoblog.com/2013/01/09/chrysler-uconnect-wins-aol-autos-tech-of-the-year/
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      I must confess . . . I was wrong about the Supercharger system. I thought it was really stupid of Tesla to ignore the standards and create their own proprietary charging system. That seemed crazy. I was wrong. There charging system is actually very clever, however it depends on the Tesla cars having very large batteries. It works like this . . . the Tesla cars have very large batteries such that 99+% of the time, people will just charge at home, work, or at conventional public chargers. However, to handle long trips, they have very-high Amp proprietary superchargers that are located between cities (often not in cities). These superchargers allow the cars to fill up a charge in around an hour . . . the time for a meal during travel. However, they will rarely be used so Tesla doesn't need very many of them. And since they are located between cities, the real estate for them will be very cheap. In fact they probably pay very little since the superchargers will be an attraction to get customers to restaurants and other road-side attractions and thus some people will be very happy to host superchargers. The system is brilliant . . . however, it does depend on having very large batteries in the cars so they are rarely used, they don't have to build many, and larger batteries can accept a very fast charge.
        paulwesterberg
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        Tesla's specification is offers high power with small plugs & sockets - which should make it cheaper. If the plug system offers acceptable durability then it should become the market standard. I hope Tesla licenses their charge port technology for broader use in the market.
          Joeviocoe
          • 1 Year Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          I think a premium on a car (at time of purchase) for lifetime access to the network is a MUCH smarter move than pay-per-charge schemes. Infrastructure won't likely be paid for with a pay-per-charge.... and you will push back from idiots who will compare a fast charge cost, with the cost of a gasoline fill up (like they did when Elon talked about Battery swaps) ... because people will think drivers will 'always' be using the most expensive method to charge. I myself would not mind spending the same per mile as gasoline to use the supercharger network. But it won't pay for the network quick enough, and would leave a bitter taste in the mouth of potential buyers, if the media misinterprets a comparison (as they tend to do).
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          Yeah, it would be very interesting if other companies decide to license the design from them and pay a fee for each car they sell for the car's lifetime access the Tesla Supercharger network. Or do a pay-per-charge deal. That would be great. It could help the Supercharger network grow even faster.
        jeff
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        To start with I thought the same thing when the released the 90KW units which were not more powerful than the SAS Combo part. Of course they quiclky went to 120Kw units. Later, I realized that the big advantage was not waiting on the government (or regulatory body) to actually do something.... The best way to set a standard is to simply build the best and do it yourself....
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @jeff
          Well . . . they are not ignoring government/regulatory stuff . . . they can charge with conventional J1772 Level 2 chargers. They are EXPANDING their system with really high-speed proprietary fast-chargers. And the entire industry/government/standards_bodies have screwed up fast-charging by not quickly coming up with a good fast standard and by having a standard war with the Chademo and SAE-CCS.
      fran
      • 1 Year Ago
      Tesla, you rock.. Again!
      dovegraybird
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wow really?? An AOL award....zzzzzzzzzz
        Nick Kordich
        • 1 Year Ago
        @dovegraybird
        ...Says the guy using an AOL account to comment on an AOL blog.
      JB
      • 1 Year Ago
      Congrats Tesla. -Changing the world.
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      There are now 3 Tesla Superchargers operational in Wisconsin. Now all we need is a service center(or two!).
      Soul Shinobi
      • 1 Year Ago
      AOL is still a thing?
        Sorten Borten
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Soul Shinobi
        Yep. They own many blogs and now specialize in ad revenue. See that obnoxious "Shop for a Vehicle" banner at the bottom of the site, or the AOL Autos links to the right? Engadget is another popular AOL blog.
          Joeviocoe
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Sorten Borten
          No... I don't see that annoy banner. ;) -Adblock Plus
        flammablewater
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Soul Shinobi
        They own this website.
      James Hoyt
      • 1 Year Ago
      The AOL Award and 75 cents will buy you a local paper.
      Joe Y
      • 1 Year Ago
      If this is the future of car design and styling I will be switching over to a scooter.
      Avinash Machado
      • 1 Year Ago
      Kudos Tesla.
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