• Image Credit: Copyright 2013 Sebastian Blanco / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2013 Sebastian Blanco / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2013 Sebastian Blanco / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2013 Sebastian Blanco / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2013 Sebastian Blanco / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2013 Sebastian Blanco / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2013 Sebastian Blanco / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2013 Sebastian Blanco / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2013 Sebastian Blanco / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2013 Sebastian Blanco / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2013 Sebastian Blanco / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2013 Sebastian Blanco / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2013 Sebastian Blanco / AOL
It's here and ready to make a big hydrogen-powered mark in the very near future. The Honda FCEV Concept took to the stage at the LA Auto Show today as a first look at the upcoming fuel-cell electric vehicle that Honda will launch in the US and Japan in 2015, with Europe following some time after that. We kind of love the bravery on display here, and Honda says the concept we see here hints at "a potential styling direction," but we can't imagine which parts of this spaceship concept vehicle we will see on the road one day.

The five-seater's technical details are perhaps more important than how it looks, since this is where the car really tries to set itself apart. A range of more than 300 miles will be possible from a 100kW hydrogen fuel cell stack that has a power density of 3kW/L, which is 60-percent higher than it was before while being 33-percent smaller than the stack in the gorgeous FCX Clarity. Honda doesn't get into the issue of a lack of fuel stations in its press release (there are only 10 public H2 stations in the US today), but it does say that the FCEV Concept could be refueled in about three minutes using a 70 MPa system.

The fuel stack's small size means this is the first time a fuel-cell powertrain has been "packaged completely in the engine room of the vehicle," Honda says, which means the company should be able to do a lot of interesting things with vehicle design, just as some EV designers can do today. Honda also says the compact size means there is "flexibility in the potential application of FC technology to multiple vehicle types in the future," so if you don't like the look of the concept unveiled today, keep your eyes peeled for something different.
Show full PR text
Honda FCEV Concept Makes World Debut at Los Angeles International Auto Show
  • Sleek and aerodynamic, 5-passenger Honda FCEV Concept expresses potential styling direction for next-generation Honda fuel cell-electric vehicle launching in 2015
  • Next generation Honda FCEV promises significant gains in real-world performance, cost reduction, efficiency, packaging and appeal, including more than 300-mile driving range
LOS ANGELES, Calif., Nov. 20, 2013 – The sleekly styled Honda FCEV Concept, made its world debut today at the Los Angeles International Auto Show. The concept expresses a potential styling direction for Honda's next-generation fuel-cell vehicle anticipated to launch in the U.S. and Japan in 2015, followed by Europe.

Showcasing exciting and modern styling, the Honda FCEV Concept features sweeping character lines underscored by an ultra-aerodynamic body. The Honda FCEV Concept also delivers ample passenger space and seating for 5-passengers thanks to new powertrain packaging efficiencies.

"The Honda FCEV Concept hints at Honda's future direction for fuel-cell vehicles," said Tetsuo Iwamura, president and CEO of American Honda Motor Co., Inc. "While this car is a concept, it points toward a very real future."

Next Generation Honda Fuel Cell-Electric Vehicle

Honda's next generation fuel cell-electric vehicle launching in 2015 will feature the world's first application of a fuel-cell powertrain packaged completely in the engine room of the vehicle, allowing for efficiencies in cabin space as well as flexibility in the potential application of FC technology to multiple vehicle types in the future. Significant technological advancements to the fuel-cell stack have yielded more than 100kW of power output. The power density is now 3kW/L, an increase of 60 percent, with the stack size reduced 33-percent compared to the FCX Clarity. The next generation Honda FCEV is anticipated to deliver a driving range of more than 300 miles with a quick refueling time of about three minutes at a pressure of 70 MPa.

"The Honda FCEV Concept not only sets our direction for our next generation fuel-cell vehicle in 2015, but for future improvements in electric drive technology," said Mike Accavitti, senior vice president of American Honda Motor Co. "The advancements we are making are substantial, meaningful and very real."

Honda Fuel-Cell Leadership

Honda has led the industry for nearly two decades in the development and deployment of fuel-cell technology through extensive real world testing, including the first government fleet deployment and retail customer leasing program. Honda has made significant technological advancements in fuel-cell operation in both hot and sub- freezing weather, meeting stringent emissions requirements and safety regulations since the introduction of its first generation fuel-cell vehicle, the FCX in 2002.

Honda began leasing its first-generation FCEV, the Honda FCX, in 2002 and has deployed vehicles in the U.S. and Japan, including its successor, the FCX Clarity, which was named the 2009 World Green Car. Honda has delivered these vehicles to individual retail consumers in the U.S. and collected valuable data concerning real-world use of fuel cell-electric vehicles and hydrogen stations.

Honda's current fuel cell-electric vehicle, the FCX Clarity, launched in July 2008 and was quickly heralded as a technological breakthrough in the areas of design, packaging and efficiency. As the world's first dedicated fuel-cell vehicle, the FCX Clarity features a striking silhouette and a low-slung cabin. With the V-flow fuel cell stack positioned down the center of the vehicle and the electric motor located in the front of the vehicle, Honda was able to maintain the Clarity's futuristic styling while delivering 240 miles of driving range.

In the effort to speed the advance of a refueling infrastructure, in May 2013, American Honda joined the public-private partnership H2USA, which brings together automakers, government agencies, hydrogen suppliers, and the hydrogen and fuel-cell industries to coordinate research and identify cost-effective solutions to deploy infrastructure that can deliver affordable, clean hydrogen fuel in the United States.

In July 2013, Honda entered into a long-term collaborative agreement with General Motors to co-develop the next-generation of fuel-cell systems and hydrogen storage technologies, aiming for the 2020 timeframe. The collaboration expects to succeed by sharing technological expertise, economies of scale and common sourcing strategies.

Honda Fuel Cell-Electric Vehicle Firsts:

The original FCX became the first EPA- and CARB-certified fuel-cell vehicle in July 2002. The FCX also was the world's first production fuel-cell vehicle, introduced to the U.S. and Japan in December 2002.

Additional highlights include:
  • The Honda FCX was the first fuel-cell vehicle to start and operate in sub-freezing temperatures (2003).
  • The FCX was the first fuel cell vehicle leased to an individual customer (July 2005).
  • Honda was the first manufacturer to build and produce a dedicated fuel cell vehicle on a production line specifically made for fuel-cell vehicles (2008).
  • Honda was the first manufacturer to create a fuel-cell vehicle dealer network (2008).
Honda Environmental Leadership

Honda is committed to further advancements in environmental technologies and the effort to improve fuel efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions from its products, including the 2014 Honda Accord Hybrid and Plug-In, the Fit EV, Civic Natural Gas and the Honda FCX Clarity fuel-cell electric vehicle (FCEV). Honda also has led the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) rankings of overall vehicle environmental performance since 2000, and a Honda vehicle has topped the list of America's greenest vehicles from the America Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) for 15 consecutive years.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 42 Comments
      Paul C from Austin
      • 1 Year Ago
      And the cost? The true cost of each vehicle? The cost of the hydrogen to power it? The cost to transport hydrogen to refueling stations?
        SAM
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Paul C from Austin
        My guess is the hydrogen will be reformed onsite at the hydrogen station from natural gas.
        archos
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Paul C from Austin
        It will be priced to compete the Porsche Cayenne, because its hydrogen and people will pay luxury car prices for the chance to ride a pressurized liquid bomb between their legs. Or so Honda was told.
          methos1999
          • 1 Year Ago
          @archos
          Yeah, because gasoline isn't flammable at all, and no gasoline cars have ever caught fire....
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @archos
          Archos is seriously bent on spreading FUD. FCVs are designed very similarly to BEVs, in the sense that they are designed to deflect any sort of fire away from the passenger compartment. Specifically, compressed hydrogen tanks are designed to vent outside and away from the vehicle in case of damage. Even if the hydrogen gas does ignite, it burns outside of the vehicle and only as long as there is hydrogen to feed it; once the hydrogen is completely vented there is no more risk.
          archos
          • 1 Year Ago
          @archos
          With a gas fire, at least there's a shot. When one of these go you're taking out the everyone. You the guy in the next lane. Anyone behind you. Anyone in front of you. There are videos in Iraq and Afghanistan of what that might look like.
      danfred411
      • 1 Year Ago
      They call it the Flying Pig.
      raktmn
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is how I would design the aesthetics of a car that I intentionally wanted to fail. The front end looks like they were using ascii characters to design it. It looks like this: [----]
        Joeviocoe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @raktmn
        That was my first thought too. There is going to be a massive blame game when this thing cannot sell.... and they will try to lead with "low demand". For decades, EVs had the same problem.
        raktmn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @raktmn
        Tail corners: <---->
      goodoldgorr
      • 1 Year Ago
      What happen if you got a flat tire in the back ?
        goodoldgorr
        • 1 Year Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        How can we check the tire pressure in the back ?
          Txdesign
          • 1 Year Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          Really? Here we have a cutting edge fuel cell vehicle and you are asking about how to check the tire pressure. If you look closely at the side view you can see the body panel shut lines are there seems to be a section in the back that may lift off to get access to the tires.
          Actionable Mango
          • 1 Year Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          TPM
      GR
      • 1 Year Ago
      This would be really cool if it were JUST an EV. Add in the fuel cell though and you lost me. A normal EV is much more economical and practical than this FCEV could ever hope to be. Try again Honda.
        slaven
        • 1 Year Ago
        @GR
        From what I read FCX Clarity does 60 miles/kg of hydrogen and that's just current state of tech... I don't see why battery EV is more economical and practical considering battery life or time to refuel. Even less so if FCEV is released in 2015 with promised specs.
      pmpjunkie01
      • 1 Year Ago
      No, I for one will definitely not be driving that.
      VL00
      • 1 Year Ago
      More greenwashing
      Levine Levine
      • 1 Year Ago
      Don't worry. Honda always screws up an idea or technology. As the first maker of hybrid cars, Honda became the second fiddler when Toyota's Synergy leap-frog over Honda's mediocre IMA hybrid powertrain. History will repeat with Honda's fuel cell. The problem is Honda's CEOs; they always want to low-ball, cut-corners thinking consumers don't know any better or are too stupid to protest.
      IBx27
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wow...wow. Unbelievable. This is the design that Honda needs to distill within the rest of their lineup. This is beautiful!
      SteveG
      • 1 Year Ago
      Honda make this the next insight. Drop the fuel cell BS and sell it as a hybrid or electric only.
      CoolWaters
      • 1 Year Ago
      The front end looks very Un-aerodynamic. I wouldn't have put "Honda Design" on that thing.
        Chris M
        • 1 Year Ago
        @CoolWaters
        It needs a large grille for cooling, that type of fuel cell is sensitive to high temperatures thus needs a large radiator. But there will be changes made, this is only a concept version.
      Shiftright
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yes futuristic, like a prop from a sci fi movie but hardly desirable.
        Chris M
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Shiftright
        This is a fanciful concept, the production version will be quite different. There is a long tradition in the automotive industry to produce eye-popping impractical concept cars that never get produced.
          archos
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Chris M
          letstakeawalk, this is the 2011 AC-X concept with EV-1 back wheel covers. Nothing original about it, and any design cues while come from the original 2011 concept this gets ITS design cues from.
        archos
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Shiftright
        A syfy channel movie. I could see this thing flying through tornados zapping sharks.
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