Honda is bringing a new concept to the this month's Los Angeles Auto Show called the FCEV Concept. "FCEV" stands for something, and no, it's not "funky chicken earns victory" or other such nonsense - it's short for fuel-cell electric vehicle, a market that Honda has played in, most recently, with its hydrogen-powered FCX Clarity.

The FCEV is nothing more than a styling exercise (click above to enlarge the sketch) for an eventual production fuel-cell vehicle set to hit US and Japanese dealers in 2015 (sorry Europe, you're stuck waiting). It's not heading to LA to tell us anything about the wider application of the technology used in the FCX Clarity, so fans of hydrogen power shouldn't get too excited. Still, the news that Honda is still pondering a wider-spread for its fuel-cell technology is quite exciting.

"The Honda FCEV Concept demonstrates the company's vision for the future of personal mobility and our commitment to developing advanced alternative fuel vehicles. As we work toward the introduction of our next-generation fuel-cell vehicle in 2015, our long-term experience with fuel-cell technologies will help us pave a way towards a zero-emissions future," said Mike Accavitti, senior vice president of American Honda.

Besides the world debut of the FCEV, Honda will also be showing more updates for the 2014 Civic. Following the showing of an enhanced Civic Coupe at SEMA last week, Honda doesn't make it clear if we'll be seeing tweaks for the coupe and sedan or if it will just be a reshowing of the models we saw in Las Vegas. Take a look below for the official press release from Honda, and then check back here on November 20 when we have a full recap of everything that happened on the Honda stand at the 2013 Los Angeles Auto Show.
Show full PR text
Honda FCEV Concept to Make World Debut at 2013 Los Angeles Auto Show

Honda FCEV Concept sketch hints at futuristic and aerodynamic design of next-generation fuel-cell electric vehicle launching in 2015
Honda also will announce further upgrades to the 2014 Civic, the best-selling compact car in the U.S.

Today a sketch was released of the Honda FCEV Concept in advance of its debut at the 2013 Los Angeles Auto Show on November 20. The concept model expresses a potential styling direction for Honda's next-generation fuel-cell electric vehicle (FCEV) launching in the U.S and Japan in 2015 and later in Europe.

"The Honda FCEV Concept demonstrates the company's vision for the future of personal mobility and our commitment to developing advanced alternative fuel vehicles," said Mike Accavitti, senior vice president of American Honda Motor Co., Inc. "As we work toward the introduction of our next-generation fuel-cell vehicle in 2015, our long-term experience with fuel-cell technologies will help us pave a way towards a zero-emissions future."

Honda has led the industry in the development and deployment of fuel-cell electric vehicles. In 2002, Honda was the first automaker to begin a retail initiative with the leasing of its fuel-cell electric vehicles to fleet customers. Honda also was the first automaker to put a fuel-cell electric vehicle in the hands of an individual retail consumer in 2005. Today, about two dozen customers are driving the FCX Clarity – enjoying the benefits of driving this advanced technology vehicle, while also contributing valuable experience, helping Honda to advance fuel-cell technology for the future.

Further details about the Honda FCEV Concept and the enhanced 2014 Civic, America's best-selling compact car, will be revealed on Nov. 20 at 1:35 p.m. PST at the Los Angeles Auto Show. For photos showing the styling direction of the Honda FCEV Concept, please visit www.hondanews.com.

Honda Environmental Leadership
In addition to producing the FCX Clarity, Honda has deployed numerous technologies to improve fuel efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions, including those incorporated in the Accord Hybrid, Accord Plug-In Sedan, Honda Fit EV and the Civic Natural Gas. Honda has also led the Union of Concerned Scientists' (UCS) rankings of overall vehicle environmental performance since 2000, and numerous Honda vehicles have been awarded top green accolades from the America Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), appearing on the ACEEE's list of America's greenest vehicles for 16 consecutive years. The FCX Clarity was also named the 2009 World Green Car.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 27 Comments
      Koenigsegg
      • 1 Year Ago
      not going to happen
      CoolWaters
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yawn. Why would I go from an EV to another Explosive fuel source?
        EZEE
        • 1 Year Ago
        @CoolWaters
        Ixnay on the explosiontay. Elsa-tay lewup-bay for the ird-thay ime-Tay.
      ICantDrive88
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think Honda is working on some sort of record for facelifts on a new car - it's been out only 2 years and has already got 2 facelifts!
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ICantDrive88
        [blocked]
        bK
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ICantDrive88
        Well it makes it interesting for us at their cost.
      taucephei
      • 1 Year Ago
      You mean I can fill up in a matter of minutes and not hours? What a concept.
      rubley00
      • 1 Year Ago
      Zero emissions? Good luck with that, producing hydrogen with zero emissions results in horrible efficiency
      Technoir
      • 1 Year Ago
      The concept looks fantastic. I like that the rear wheels are covered in aerodynamic body shell. If only it was an EV and not another pie in the sky fuel cell car.
        Letstakeawalk
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Technoir
        Design cues from this concept are likely to end up on much of Honda's range. The current Hybrid Insight looks very much like a scaled-down FCX Clarity.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        • 1 Year Ago
        [blocked]
      goodoldgorr
      • 1 Year Ago
      Im interrested to buy. I never heard of any drawbacks concerning these fuelcell vehicles. It was a dream from the get-go and they succeeded in improving them even more with more powerful smaller less costly fuelcell units. Many will buy, it will maybe make a dent on petrol sales and price of gasoline might shrink helping gas car owners like me and 99.7% of the markets that do not own bevs, plug-ins hybrids, hydrogen operated cars and light trucks. Further progress might be done in the hydrogen infrastructure with hydrogen made at the retail location made with small machineries like electrolizers or natural gas reformers, etc. Even green algae farming can produce hydrogen, so let\'s go hydrogen, go, go, go, hurry-up, can\'t wait anymore, lets start the hostilities on conventionnal made petroleum now and forever.
        Joeviocoe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        --" I never heard of any drawbacks concerning these fuelcell vehicles." Then you haven't been reading.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          I think that fact that you cannot buy one is a bit of a drawback.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          I was talking to an engineer the other day, who was supervising the construction of a local gasoline station. I asked him for a ball park figure, and he stated that current gasoline stations fun around $2 million a pop to build, up to $4 for a really big Interstate station. He seemed to think that hydrogen stations, at $2 million or so, were pretty much on par for capital costs. So, once the government authorities give the go-ahead with proper codes and standards for hydrogen station design, he was quite optimistic that construction could happen as needed to support the gradual introduction of FCVs.
          Joeviocoe
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          LTAW... exactly my point. The chicken / egg problem again. Gasoline stations have a virtual "guarantee" of demand from the moment they turn on their pumps. ROI is easily achieved if the location is chosen with half a brain. Did you ask your engineer friend how much it costs per year to operate and maintain said gasoline station? Ask him if he thinks a $2mil gasoline station could be sustained for the couple of years if their only customers were drivers of a single model, $60k - $80k car? ---------------------- I am happy that you have an expert in gasoline stations to speak to... the upfront costs are indeed a sticking point. But they MUST be measured in context with demand economics. Talk to Biodiesel station owner sometime. They are more analogous to Hydrogen than gasoline stations. The economics of biodiesel are quite disadvantageous for station owners. Not only in a regulatory sense, but demand wise, they have no consistent or reliable demand except for a few highly competitive fleets (who often choose to own the fuel production process themselves). For several years Biodiesel was subsidized and was expected to stand on its own economic feet. Then, the $1/gal blender credit expired and was not renewed. The economics collapsed. And this is even with so many diesel engines on the road. It came down to costs. So yes, biodiesel vs. ULSD costs are about the same (a bit more expensive now). And costs per mile driven are slightly higher with biodiesel... so the analogy is perfect there. As Hydrogen expects to have a lower cost per mile than gasoline equivalent. But most diesels can already handle biodiesel without upfront cost. Switching to fuel cells is going to be expensive for the time being. And there is no indication that lower H2 fueling costs will offset price premium... there is no clear price for a consumer FCV, nor a price for retail H2. --------------- In truth, I expect the roll out of H2 infrastructure to be similar to both Biodiesel and CNG/LPG. Misguided and full of faulty assumptions about demand... and a huge waste of money.... and yet another black eye for the Green Auto movement. It won't be worth the Billions spent on the whole fiasco, but the upside is that I think some fleets will get their FCVs and start to own and operate their own H2 fueling depots. Which is a good thing.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          The only real issue with FCVs, as Joeviocoe is wont to point out, is refueling. Other than that, they work very well.
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          @ Joeviocoe Letstakeawalk is correct. Your aversion to H2 technology, makes you create false scenario's to justify why H2 refuelling infrastructure will fail. Understandably, given your ideological preference, you desire H2/ FCV failure. Such desire, makes you blind to reality, and 'realpolitic", and you argue what you want to be true, while ignoring all other possibilities. You refuse to accept that both government's and fuel companies, have very sound economic reasons to invest in H2 refuelling tinfrastructure. Shell has a budget of $15.6 billion set aside for H2 refuelling infrastructure, with $3 billion already invested in FCV technology. The business model for H2 refining and refuelling infrastructure is not only economically viable, but enormously profitable from it's inception. Shell estimates a "stage one" roll out of over 6000 outlets.(the US has about 112,000 filling stations, but only 35,000 major outlets) ($15.6 billion isn't a lot for an oil company to protect its revenue! The 10 major oil companies could invest $200 billion, without blinking) Such coverage would provide an FCV driver with absolute certainty of always being able to refuel. If Shell invests, other oil companies will also quickly invest to protect their market share. The general public will have confidence in the Oil companies ability to provide refuelling infrastructure. Most oil companies have long since moved out of retailing, but this is an excellent model for highly profitable investment returns, secured against solid revenues. FCV and H2 technology can advance at a comparatively leisurely pace, since revenue from gasoline/diesel remains hugely profitable, and conventional ICE vehicle sales remain very profitable. There is no question of losing government support, since governments are more attracted to the H2 tax model. While EV battery technology, remains expensive, and more importantly, lacking in range, H2 will prove more popular, due to greater convenience, familiarity, and versatility. Governments will support FCV sales and H2 infrastructure, as both products are popularly perceived in the electorate as "green" technology, and H2 is not disruptive the the existing stream of revenue from the tax on fuel at the pump. The only question remaining, is not the fuel, funding, technology, or logistical resources, but Auto-manufacturers ability to meet Shell's criteria for a practical FCV. Shell's criteria requires FCV's with no more than 10% price premium, and similar performance to ICE models. Shell expects to produce H2 for a similar pump price, or lower, per gallon to gasoline (including Tax). Given the efficiency of FCV's , overall running costs will be considerably lower. Joe, like you, I am an EV enthusiast. I have considerable investment and vested interest in the success of EV technology. But, I'm also a realist, and I can't allow emotion to cloud my judgement by ignoring facts I don't like
          Joeviocoe
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          ** "And costs per mile driven are slightly higher with biodiesel... so the analogy [NOT] is perfect there. As Hydrogen expects to have a lower cost per mile than gasoline equivalent."
      SayItAintSo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Great.. now how about adding Dual Zone climate (Si) and locking glovebox..
      Jmaister
      • 1 Year Ago
      if the H isnt there. I'd thunk its a VW.
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