Geely and Volvo will finally team up for a jointly developed vehicle, more than three years after the safety-minded Swedish brand was gobbled up by Geely's parent company, according to a report in Automotive News Europe. The story quotes Geely's CEO, Gui Sheng Yue saying, "We have entered into actual research and development stage and I believe we can see the new product in the year after next."

That means 2015, which is a mighty ambitious timetable to bring a vehicle to market. But as Geely's CEO explains, life isn't going to get any easier in the Chinese market, "Competitive pressure on domestic brands in the China market should increase considerably in the coming years as most major international brands are strengthening their presence," he told ANE. Those statements also tell us that we shouldn't expect to see Geely on American shores any time soon. The brand is simply too focused on topping the Chinese market, at least among CDM brands.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 4 Comments
      Lunch
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wouldn't buy no Geely here. No way.
      rboote
      • 1 Year Ago
      Dear Geely, Just three days ago we saw video of one of your models failing Latin NCAP crash testing terribly. Understand you are entering the market in an even worse position than the Koreans 30 years ago. Everybody figured their products would be crap, but there was no actual evidence. You enter the largest/oldest car market in the world with the stigma of having cheaply-made cars with stolen designs that are literally dangerously unsafe. You bought Volvo, with the reputation of being extremely safe. You need to direct a large, large percentage of your R&D funds into safety. If you want any success your cars literally have to be the safest on American roads. You have to spend a significant part of your marketing budget PROVING this to the American automotive buyer. Anything less than this, and you'll have no success. People will buy a two year-old Japanese or Korean model rather than your new product. Good luck, I'm available for a reasonable consulting fee.