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Not to be outdone by BMW and its 45-mile-per-gallon 2014 328d or the new Chevrolet Cruze Diesel, Volkswagen is reportedly preparing to launch a more-efficient TDI diesel engine in North America. In speaking with VW recently, Edmunds learned that the automaker plans to replace its current 2.0-liter TDI engine used in many VW and Audi products (including the Golf, Passat, Jetta, Beetle and Audi A3) beginning in the second half of next year.

No word on the displacement of this new EA288 engine, but the article states that horsepower could rise from 140 up to 150 and quotes a VW spokesperson who says the next-gen TDI mill should realize about an eight-percent improvement in highway fuel economy compared to the current engine. Doing the math, that suggests future VW and Audi TDI models could get up to 45 or 46 mpg on the highway.


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  • 34 Comments
      milkylainen
      • 1 Year Ago
      The EA288 has been around for a year now already. By the time it is installed in the US cars, yet another year, it is an old "new" engine already. WV is about to release the modified EA288 which will encompass the Euro6 emission level regulation on all EA288 variants. There are articles out there on the EA288 from early 2012...
      Not Rappaport
      • 1 Year Ago
      Will VW make the new TDI B20-certified like its bow-tied competition?
      TechFreak@Farinia
      • 2 Months Ago

      A client has recently asked me what steel is actually a diesel common rail made of. This is good article on the topic: http://www.farinia.com/automotive/common-rail/required-mechanical-properties-of-common-rail-for-diesel-direct-injection

      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      VW can now compete against the 2004 Toyota Prius.
        sfast
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        Compete? Ask your right foot if the TDi can compete.
        Quen47
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        Isn't this an auto enthusiast site? I don't think anyone who cares about the driving experience is cross shopping a Prius with a VW.
      UNITEUNION
      • 1 Year Ago
      Ok guys, let's get serious. Diesel car sales in Europe are near 70% of the total. And VW group is by far, the largest car seller in Europe, selling as twice as the second seller (peugeot group). Worldwide, the VW group is third on the list, selling almost the same as Toyota and GM. So well, do you think VW TDI cars aren't reliable?? Do you think that some turbo or gas pump failures happened in the past (into the 1.9cc non-common rail engines by the way) are worh such a big gossip you make out of it??
      Michael
      • 1 Year Ago
      @ John Fish Kurmann, let's dispel a myth. There's a HUGE difference between EPA estimates and actual mileage achieved. VW diesels, for whatever reason, consistently out perform EPA estimates. For instance, my 2012 VW Golf TDI with manual transmission, is EPA rated at 30 city, 42 highway. Yet consistently, around town, my mileage is 41.5 - 42 mpg. Summer, winter, air conditioning or not, that's what I average. When I'm on the highway I never get less than 50 mpg, but have gotten as high as 59 mpg, and very often 55 mpg or better. And in my conversations with other TDI owners, they have expressed similar results. So, in my opinion, the Prius has NOTHING on the TDI. And never will I have to replace batteries, which is no environmentally kind procedure. And all this is achieved with the TDI and fun to boot. And what is wrong with more energy with the same volume of fuel? Just asking. And the problem with driving a Prius is you're driving a Prius. Nope. I'll take my TDI any day.
        skierpage
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Michael
        Burning tons of fossil fuel is the "no environmentally kind procedure", replacing a non-toxic 120-lb recyclable battery pack after 100,000 - 250,000+ miles of reduced gas consumption is nothing in comparison. Road & Track had an extensive side-by-side economy comparison of the Golf TDI and Prius in 2010 (search for hybrid Reality Real-world mpg with the Toyota Prius, Volkswagen Golf diesel). In every driving scenario the Prius got better mpg than the TDI, in congested traffic and city driving massively better. Enjoy your TDI, it's a fine car. The 8% improvement from the new engine is worthwhile. It would do even better in city driving if VW offered it a a mild hybrid that shuts off at a standstill and has limited ability to recover brake energy, as the European "Blu*" versions already do. But that would increase the cost, and confuse VW fanboys.
      Mr. BaderĀ®
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good job VW
      Michael
      • 1 Year Ago
      @skierpage, uh last time I checked, gasoline, which the Prius does burn, is still considered a fossil fuel, is it not? So what's the difference, whether you burn reduced levels of diesel or gasoline? You're still putting hydrocarbons into the air. So what are you going to do, ride a bicycle everywhere all year long, year after year? And one thing that every Prius or Leaf or Think driver fails to consider are the resources and the manufacturing process for those batteries and the pollution induced in not just their disposal, but their manufacture. And for plug-ins, well, the electricity for charging has to come from somewhere. So again, I feel that when one looks at the whole scenario, VW clean diesels are just as earth friendly as the Prius. But I do agree that if VW were to incorporate the on-off technology to supplant idling, which I understand is in the generation 7 vehicles, and combining diesel with hybrid technology, even greater fuel economy could be realized. One small step at a time. Fact is, and the reason for my post, is that popular culture just assumes Toyota's superiority with the Prius, and I say, not so fast. Too many people look right past the VW's and I believe that's a mistake. For those who realize that the driving experience is far more than just the numbers on a spec sheet or comparison test, VW offers viable, enjoyable alternatives to the Prius lineup. And VW is on the cutting edge of even greater economy and performance breakthroughs, just as Toyota. I think the VW's are superior, but then no one's forcing those who prefer Priuses to drive them. I'm just beckoning people who are undecided to give the VW's a look because I'm a satisfied VW owner who feels that my VW, and my wife's, have far exceeded our original expectations, and we both grin from ear to ear when we're behind the wheels of these vehicles. We'd like others to experience the same "fahrvergnugen!"
        4EvsHybrids
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Michael
        Clean Diesels are an oxymoron. When the EV technologies mature, the only user of Dino fuel will be Gas-Electric Hybrids. Gone will be all the EPA Superfund sites called oil refineries and diesel-fueled vehicles that emit higher levels of nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons than gas vehicles. Face it Renault put out a damming report on Clean Diesels that follows what the EPA and CARB has already stated about unhealthful amounts of air pollution from Diesel Technology. Yes keep all Diesels in Europe where the two pack a day smoker can appreciate it. Stinky Diesels!
          wxman
          • 1 Year Ago
          @4EvsHybrids
          Then why does the National Academy of Sciences conclude in a 2010 report that clean diesel technology has among the lowest, if not the lowest, cradle-to-grave environmental and public health damages (lifecycle emissions) of any of the technologies they considered, including hybrid, PHEV, pure EV, gasoline, CNG, E85, or cellulosic ethanol? Also, why have laboratory animals exposed to concentrated exhaust from clean diesel engines shown no effects, cancer or any other health effects, after lifetime exposure?
      Davidsrn1
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have owned both a 2011 toyota. Prius and a 2013 VW Passat, and there really is no comparison. When I owned the Prius, I was received an average of around 44-47 mpg's. When I first bought it, I saw up to 50-51mpg's in town, but as it got broken in, it went down. I worked hard to get around 44 mpg's, and felt like a prisoner to get that. If you've ever driven a hybrid you understand how difficult it is to get the best gas mileage. I have read hypermiling techniques, and fully bought into it, no matter how may other drivers I made mad. The only possible fun in driving a Prius comes with the potential reward of getting that kind of mileage. As far as the Passat, I have owned it for 11k miles as well, and it continues to get better and better gas mileage. I currently am averaging around 43mpg's, with a little more on the highway than in the city. I usually get right around 50mpg's on my highway trips, and have seen as low as 30 mpg's in bad city traffic with the A/C on, and still have more fun than I've ever had in my Prius!! The space is much better, the fit and finish is not even in the same conversation. The. Prius was cheap inside and surrounds with plastics. Hollow and loud, and frustrating to try and stay inside the "battery only" mode as I would creep from a red light. The Passat is just downright fun. All that torque! I had no idea it made such a difference. I understand that diesel is more expensive than regular fuel, and when you do the short term calculations the cost/price of fuel is quite different. But when you consider that diesels last much longer as their gas counterparts(not to mention hybrids), I think the $ changes. Bottom line, I hated driving the Prius and love my Passat!!!
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      crshcrstr
      • 1 Year Ago
      the last tdi I owned was an 84 jetta (I owned it in 2004), and I got an average of 46. Were they not already getting about this mileage? Side note, that car had 78 horses, and would go 55 mph no problem, but if you got up to 65, the mileage would drop precipitously.
      PeterScott
      • 1 Year Ago
      Where the heck are the posts going? The count is going down. My post that just asked whether the new engine had a timing belt was deleted.
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