Hurricane Sandy was the largest Atlantic storm in US history, and its total economic impact is just now coming into view. According to Automotive News, Toyota, Chrysler, Nissan and Honda are set to scrap around 15,000 new vehicles ruined by the storm. Nissan alone accounts for about 40 percent of those, with 6,000 Nissan and Infiniti models deeded "un-saleable" due to damage. The company saw 56 dealerships shuttered due to the storm, but 51 of those have since reopened.

Toyota, meanwhile, had some 4,000 vehicles at its Newark port facility, and of those, 3,000 may be scrapped. An additional 825 were dealer inventory when they were ruined. Honda and Acura dealers are reportedly sending 3,440 vehicles to the salvage yard. By comparison, Chrysler weathered the storm fairly well with 825 units destroyed, while Hyundai suffered only 400 lost units and Kia scrapped around 200.

As you may recall, Fisker also suffered some losses, and Automotive News reports the manufacturer saw 320 Karma models damaged beyond repair. Ford and General Motors have yet to come up with estimates, and no automaker has commented on the full cost of replacing the vehicles.

Meanwhile, NADA said the storm could claim as many as 200,000 personal vehicles.


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  • 23 Comments
      The Fat Stig
      • 2 Years Ago
      In related news, 200K new Donor Cars are now available for 24 Hours of Lemons newly formed "Hurricane Class"
      Bill
      • 2 Years Ago
      Do they not watch the news? Did they not see that a 800 mile wide storm was coming? Did they not think it might be wise to move their vehicles to a better area?
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Bill
        [blocked]
          dej
          • 2 Years Ago
          Correct. Move them North or South? Storm tracks a week out weren't sure where landfall was. West? The storm went over central PA. Parts of West Virginia and Tennessee got between 18 inches and 24 inches of snow. With enough advance notice, you might have been able to schedule trains to move them. That would have taken hundreds of railroad cars that were not most likely not nearby ( a train car not being used is not making money) . And again, what are the orders? West and don't stop?
        Andre Neves
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Bill
        Bill, you are an idiot.
        BrianD
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Bill
        And put them where on mars!
        RWD
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Bill
        I know right? The arid Arizona desert is an ideal place to store cars, why didn't they just have them all airlifted there for a week or two???
        Deepen Gandhi
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Bill
        why would they? the cars are insured and they get paid when the salvage vehicles are auctioned off at salvage auto spots!
      4gasem
      • 2 Years Ago
      They ARE just a mechanical device. The loss of life was relatively low which is what counts here.
      Stang70Fastback
      • 2 Years Ago
      This isn't aimed at the car companies, since you can't really relocate 15,000 vehicles that easily, but to private vehicle owners. I realize that sometimes there is nothing you can do to avoid a tree, or a house, or a rabid horse falling from the sky and destroying your car during a hurricane, but what I really don't understand is the people who can't take the two minutes to relocate their vehicle to NOT the lowest point on their property. I've seen so many photos of areas flooded by water where the car is half submerged, but would have been fine if it had been parked on a different part of the property. I realize most people aren't car nuts, and to a lot of them it's just a tool, but it is STILL the second most expensive thing they own, and I fail to understand why people don't bother to take the time to at least ATTEMPT to keep it safe. If people were this lazy 100 years ago, it would have been a freaking horse holocaust.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Stang70Fastback
        [blocked]
        m_2012
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Stang70Fastback
        They only had a weeks notice to get out of town. I don't think insurance should pay a dime to people that have car damaged as a result of this. You don't get a week notice for a earthquake or a tornado, you do for a hurricane. Just leave already!
      wilkegm
      • 2 Years Ago
      Usually, once the insurance company pays up, they assume ownership of the vehicles. Potentially, they can be sold to salvage operations for hard parts, that are un-affected by the flood- like plastic body panels or tires. For the dealers and auto makers, however, the inventory losses are compensated by the need to replace previously sold cars, also damaged bty the storm.
        Kobe Wild
        • 2 Years Ago
        @wilkegm
        These cars will end up on used car lot's all over the USA... trust me they won't be scrapping them. There's no legal reason why they will crush these cars as they should.
      Merc1
      • 2 Years Ago
      We should see a big bump in sales after the first of the year and especially next spring once the weather breaks and all that insurance money comes in. Nov might be too early for anyone to replace yet as the area is still getting pounded, now with snow. M
      Deepen Gandhi
      • 2 Years Ago
      gonna be some great deals on flood salvage vehicles at salvage auto dealers! :D I know place that got 200 Honda's from Metro Honda in Jersey City! Gonna pick up an Accord Touring, sticker price 35K for around 22 :D
      Deepen Gandhi
      • 2 Years Ago
      this is bad news for dealers, but great news for people who want to buy these salvage vehicles at a fraction of their sticker price!
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