Lo and behold, folks: Hyundai has wowed the crowds in Paris with what it says is the world's first serial production hydrogen fuel cell vehicle. Honda may disagree, but the Korean automaker says its ix35 Fuel Cell vehicle will be made available for private and public lease by the end of 2012, making it the first commercially available vehicle running on hydrogen.

Production is slated to begin in December of 2012, and Hyundai plans to produce 1,000 ix35 Fuel Cell vehicles by 2015, after which mass production across the globe is planned. We'll see.

As with all vehicles powered by a hydrogen fuel cell, water vapor is the only thing exhausted out the tailpipe. Besides the lack of emissions and the sound of an internal combustion engine, Hyundai says its new alt-fuel crossover is indistinguishable from a regular gas-burning ix35 (better known in North America as the Hyundai Tucson).

With a range of up to 365 miles, this is one is a seemingly practical zero-emission machine. Powerful, though, it is not – Hyundai quotes a top speed of 100 miles per hour and a 0-62 mph run of 12.5 seconds. Read all about the ix35 Fuel Cell below, but not before checking out our high-res gallery of live shots above.
Show full PR text
HYUNDAI IS FIRST TO LAUNCH SERIES PRODUCTION OF ZERO-EMISSIONS HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLE

Up to 1,000 ix35 Fuel Cells on the road through 2015
Cutting-edge proof of Hyundai's commitment to eco-friendly mobility
Public, private fleets targeted


Hyundai Motor Co. announced today that it will begin series production of its hydrogen ix35 Fuel Cell vehicle for public and private lease by the end of 2012, becoming the first global automaker to begin commercial rollout of zero-emissions vehicles.

In December 2012, Hyundai will begin production of the ix35 Fuel Cell at its Ulsan manufacturing facility in Korea, with a target of building up to 1,000 vehicles by 2015.

Hyundai has already signed contracts with cities in Denmark and Sweden to lease the ix35 Fuel Cell to municipal fleets.

Beyond 2015, Hyundai plans limited mass production of the ix35 Fuel Cell, with a goal of 10,000 units.

"The ix35 Fuel Cell is the pinnacle of Hyundai's advanced engineering and our most powerful commitment to be the industry leader in eco-friendly mobility," said Vice Chairman Woong Chul Yang, head of Hyundai R&D. "Zero-emissions cars are no longer a dream. Our ix35 Fuel Cell vehicle is here today, and ready for commercial use."

Built with proprietary technology, Hyundai's ix35 Fuel Cell is powered by hydrogen. A fuel cell stack converts the hydrogen into electricity, which in turn charges the Lithium Polymer battery that powers the vehicle's electric motor. The only emission generated by the ix35 Fuel Cell is water vapour.

The ix35 Fuel Cell is the halo vehicle in Hyundai's Blue Drive sub-brand, the badge worn by Hyundai's cleanest vehicles, including Sonata Hybrid, i20 Blue Drive and BlueOn, Hyundai's battery-powered i10.

As governments around the world step up regulations to reduce carbon output and fossil fuel dependency, zero-emissions mobility solutions such as Hyundai's ix35 Fuel Cell will become a driving force of change. The ix35 Fuel Cell aligns with the 2009 agreement by the European Union's G8 countries to reduce carbon emissions by 80 percent by 2050 and California's Zero Emission Vehicle regulations.

Hyundai's ix35 Fuel Cell boasts drivability and performance similar to that of the petrol ix35. The ix35 Fuel Cell can be filled with hydrogen in only a few minutes. It accelerates from zero to 62mph in 12.5 seconds, has a top speed of 160km/h (100mph) and can travel 588km (365miles) without refuelling.

Hyundai chose its popular ix35 as the first vehicle for its fuel cell technology. The ix35 is Hyundai's second-best-selling car in Europe, behind only i30, and was one of the first to display Hyundai's award-winning Fluidic Sculpture design identity.

Hyundai is encouraged by the actions of several governments, especially in Europe, that have created detailed roadmaps for building a hydrogen infrastructure and are providing necessary funds. Hydrogen fuelling stations exist in several European nations and additional ones are being built and planned. Expansion of fuelling stations is also anticipated in Korea and California, and Hyundai will supply its ix35 Fuel Cell to public and private fleets there, as well.

As a true zero-emissions vehicle, the Hyundai ix35 Fuel Cell is a powerful partner for public and private fleets that want to eliminate carbon emissions.

Hyundai's ix35 Fuel Cell is currently participating in the European Hydrogen Road Tour, organised by the European demonstration programme, H2moves. The Road Tour is a multi-city, pan-European display of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle technology, which has stopped in Paris during the motor show. Members of the media and the public are welcome to drive the Hyundai ix35 Fuel Cell at the Road Tour display.

Test versions of the ix35 Fuel Cell have already received both acclaim and significant day-to-day use. The ix35 Fuel Cell was selected as a test-drive vehicle for members of the European Parliament in 2011. Hyundai fuel cells and ix35 Fuel Cell vehicles provided power and transportation for the 2012 Yeosu Expo in Korea.

The ix35 Fuel Cell is the result of 14 years and significant financial investment in research and development by hundreds of engineers at Hyundai's fuel cell R&D centre in Mabuk, Korea. The car has logged more than 2 million miles of road tests in real-world conditions in Europe, Korea and the U.S.

In early 2012, a Hyundai ix35 Fuel Cell set a range record for hydrogen cars by driving from Oslo to Monaco using only existing fuelling stations.

Hyundai Motor Group Chairman Mong Koo Chung has made the fuel cell programme a top priority for the company, leading its efforts to produce eco-friendly mobility solutions and be a responsible corporate citizen.

The Hyundai ix35 Fuel Cell Vehicle

The ix35 Fuel Cell is not only the most advanced eco-friendly vehicle produced by Hyundai, it is a working vehicle ready to stand the rigors of daily use in public and private fleets.

From a driver and passenger viewpoint, the ix35 Fuel Cell is barely distinguishable from its conventionally powered cousin. The only difference drivers are likely to notice is the absence of engine noise, thanks to the ix35 Fuel Cell's whisper-quiet electric induction motor.

Hyundai's downsizing of its proprietary fuel cell stack enables the ix35 Fuel Cell to accommodate five passengers with comfort. A fill-up at a hydrogen fuelling station takes only a few minutes − just like the petrol-powered ix35. With a range of 588km (365 miles), the ix35 Fuel Cell eliminates "range anxiety" often associated with alternative-fuel vehicles.

The new Hyundai ix35 Fuel Cell has received an exterior makeover, with a new grille and other design touches that distinguish it from its predecessor test vehicles.

Inside, the ix35 Fuel Cell has received a significant upgrade. The fuel economy and range have been improved by 10 percent over the previous-generation model. Internal systems have been additionally modularised so the ix35 Fuel Cell can be easily manufactured on a conventional assembly line at Hyundai's Ulsan facility.

Most importantly for motorists, the new ix35 Fuel Cell has been tuned for the demanding preferences of European drivers, with improved handling and driving dynamics.

Hyundai's ix35 Fuel Cell has unique operating features that set it apart from its competitors.

Unlike other fuel cell vehicles that use compressed air to supply oxygen to the fuel cell stack, Hyundai's ix35 Fuel Cell uses ambient air. This reduces parasitic loss in the oxygen supply, raising fuel efficiency and reducing power consumption by 50 per cent. For passengers, the elimination of an air compressor reduces noise inside the cabin.

In addition to the fuel cell stack, the ix35 Fuel Cell uses the same lithium-polymer battery found in the Hyundai Sonata Hybrid. A kinetic energy regeneration system charges the battery when the driver applies the brakes or drives downhill.

The ix35 Fuel Cell is equipped with stop/start technology, which shuts down the fuel cell stack and relies on battery power only when the vehicle is idling, minimising energy loss in city driving.

The ix35 Fuel Cell combines all of the drivability, styling and features of Hyundai's popular ix35 and adds a powerful bonus: zero emissions.

The Hyundai Fuel Cell Programme

Hyundai's fuel cell programme is based at its Eco-Technology Research Institute in Mabuk, Korea, about 45 minutes south of Seoul. The centre represents the leading edge of Hyundai's eco-friendly power train research.

The energy-saving LEED-certified research centre has its own hydrogen fuelling station and manufactures its fuel cell stacks in-house.

The programme was launched in 1998 with a roadmap targeting series production of fuel cell vehicles by the end of 2012 and consumer sales by 2015.

"The mission of the Mabuk research centre is to create commercially viable, zero-emissions vehicles," said Dr Tae Won Lim, Managing Director of fuel cell R&D. "The ix35 Fuel Cell achieves that goal, providing a clear choice for public and private fleets."

The ix35 Fuel Cell Specifications

Length 4,410 mm
Width 1,820 mm
Height 1,655 mm
Driving range on one fill-up 588 km
Vehicle efficiency 0.96 kgH2/100km
Top speed 160 km/h (100 mph)
Acceleration, 0 to 100 km/h 12.5 seconds
Fuel cell output power 100 kW
Energy storage system Battery, 24 kW
Fuel Hydrogen (700 bar, 5.6 kg)
Exhaust gas Water vapour


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 85 Comments
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      I like how they are claiming credit for something they haven't even done yet which doesn't even really qualify for what they claim.
      Wayne Gilbert
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hydrogen is the future. Forget all that Biofuel junk the corporations and government has been pushing. Our government should be pushing to get the hydrogen infrastructure built. Sorry no more money in the pocket from the big oil companies Obama.
      Wayne Gilbert
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hydrogen wont even be close to the same price as gas. People can manufacturer it at home with a device no bigger than a small refrigerator. The only thing that would drive the price up is if the government decides to tax the hell out of it.
      scion_tc
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hyundai "claims" their cars get 40mpg too, but they don't
      Ernst Joubert
      • 2 Years Ago
      Why do automakers keep flogging the dead horse of hydrogen feul cell vehicles? These vehicles are NOT (at least in the next few decades) going to reduce emissions and, hence, are not going to make any difference in the fight against global warming. Given the slow pace at which alternatively feuled cars are being introduced, I think hydrogen proponents underestimate the time it will take to roll out infrastructure. WE DONT HAVE that much time to reduce emissions significantly. If hydrogen is ever to become the alternative of choice, then it is going to take at least 50 years to gain a foothold large enough to make a REAL difference. Once again, we dont have time! There is currently much better technology to reduce emissions (quickly) that is already on the market, namely plugin hybrids (and to a lesser extent EV's). These cars are already in the hands of REAL consumers. How many feul cell cars are in the hands of individuals? Why do so few car companies offer plugin hybrids for sale? There is no sense of urgency. I dont believe the "EV's are not practical yet" line used by the auto industry. Look at what Tesla has acheived with relatively limited resources. At least they are starting to bring down the costs for average consumers. I have the following theory: 1) Car companies like to do very little in addressing emissions. (Maybe not so much nissan, toyota and GM because at least they have something REAL on offer) 2) They are very aware of the "chicken and egg" infrastructure issue that faces FCEV's. Who is going to invest trillions of dollars to build the necessary infrastructure? Hence, they know that they cant be blamed for not rolling out FCEV's on a large scale because the infrastructure is not there. So this issue is a CONVENIENT scapegoat, because it allows them to still do nothing (no urgency) while, at the same time, maintaining positive PR (creating the illusion that they are doing something). 3) They over emphasize the pros of FCEVs, but underplay the substantial hurdles the technology faces. Conclusion: The push of FCEV's is a "do nothing" strategy. Lastly, making modest feul efficiency gains (like BMW, Audi and VW) is not going to address global warming because, every year, the number of cars on the road increases and so any gains are, effectively, wiped out.
        usbseawolf2000
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ernst Joubert
        Take a look at this chart from Toyota. I think it should sum it up for you. http://bioage.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341c4fbe53ef0120a5ba443f970b-800wi
          JakeY
          • 2 Years Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          I'd rather look at something more scientific, the ANL Greet Model: http://greet.es.anl.gov/results In both the US and CA average mix, the EV wins over the hydrogen car significantly in terms of efficiency. And the figures used by Toyota are outdated (they are using a figure from 2004): As of 2010, the average efficiency of natural gas plants in the US is 41.68%. http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=107&t=3 Plus there is a bigger difference between the tank to wheel efficiency than they indicate. http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/fcv_sbs.shtml http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/evsbs.shtml The only two EPA certified fuel cell vehicles get: 60MPGe for the Clarity and 52MPGe for the F-Cell. EVs on the other hand, range from 112MPGe to 73MPGe. In the extreme case, an EV is more than twice as efficient as a fuel cell vehicle, while Toyota only estimates 44% more efficient.
          Dave
          • 2 Years Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          Youre comparing SUVs to compact cars.
          JakeY
          • 2 Years Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          @Dave When did the B-Class F-Cell become an SUV? It's a 5 door compact hatch like the Ford Focus (the Focus is actually longer and wider than the B-Class, although not as tall) and the Leaf (the Leaf is closer in dimensions, only an inch down in width and 2 inches down in height). It competes squarely with the 1-series and A3, not the X3 and Q3, which is the job of the GLK. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercedes-Benz_B-Class http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nissan_Leaf http://media.ford.com/images/10031/2013_Focus_Specs.pdf We'll have a direct comparison when the E-Cell gets EPA numbers.
          JakeY
          • 2 Years Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          "Well to tank also includes transmission losses. If the grid is 93% efficient, then .93*.4168 = 38.8% efficient from well to tank." You are correct that I forgot transmission losses, which are 6.5% for 2010. http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=105&t=3 http://www.eia.gov/electricity/state/unitedstates/index.cfm "Your fuel economy links are useless because they do not consider well to tank efficiency." Did you even read my comment? The EPA figures are far from useless and are in fact critical to the whole comparison. Toyota figures 59% tank to wheel for FCV, 85% for EV. So EV is 144% of the FCV according to them. If you use EPA figures (which are closer to real world efficiency than the Japanese cycle Toyota uses), and you get to see the actual end result based on the vehicle you are comparing (so you can compare the same vehicle type rather than just an average). The EV is about 200% the efficiency of the FCV for tank to wheel (Focus vs F-Cell, which is more than fair). Assuming Toyota's numbers for well to tank are correct, that would bump the FCV from 119% the efficiency of the EV to 86% of the EV, flipping the result of which one is more efficient (*under natural gas*, a mix that includes nuclear, hydro, renewables, like our actual grid, is another story).
          Val
          • 2 Years Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          @usb any chance we can see a chart where the hybrid is powered by CNG and not gasoline?
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ernst Joubert
        The points you make are extensively addressed in this thread. No real debate is possible if you either have not read or responded to the very detailed refutations available.
          Ernst Joubert
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Dear Dave: The issue is: How quickly can FCEV's (given the time it will take infrastructure to be layed out) be deployed to make a difference in the fight against global warming. Not nearly fast enough. The electric charging infrastructure is already there. Also: Hydrogen proponents need to pray that current tech (batteries) doesnt become better in the meantime
          Ernst Joubert
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Dear Dave: The issue is: How quickly can FCEV's (given the time it will take infrastructure to be layed out) be deployed to make a difference in the fight against global warming. Not nearly fast enough. The electric charging infrastructure is already there. Also: Hydrogen proponents need to pray that current tech (batteries) doesnt become better in the meantime
          Ernst Joubert
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Also, if Hydrogen is currently derived mainly from natural gas, isnt it better to use natural gas directly?
        Philip
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ernst Joubert
        Hydrogen is practical for several reasons: 1. The technology isn't that new - it has been around for a long time and we can get pretty decent mileage with it. 365 miles on this car, but we could always get even more with a larger tank. This is a problem which pure electric vehicles still have to crack. Many companies already have very fancy fuel cell technologies - Honda, Nissan, GM etc. 2. If you live in an apartment block, it is really difficult to charge your car overnight because the parking lots will not have charging points - and it is impractical to get the apartment block to rewire the parking lots to give the sort of load required for multiple cars to charge overnight. So in the case of EVs, it becomes complicated to charge the vehicles - which brings us to the next point. 3. The existing network of fuel station operators can convert one or more of their pumping units to serve hydrogen. 4.. It is possible to refuel quickly and not hours (like in the case of EVs) - So from the point of view of getting support on the fuel station operators, it will be far easier to get support for hydrogen. 5. Plugin hybrid is fine and dandy but then you are lugging around a IC engine even when you are running only on electric. And when you are running on gasoline, you are lugging around all of the batteries and the electric motors. So overall efficiencies are smaller. in the case of hydrogen fuel cells, you only need to carry the fuel load. 6. There are numerous technologies right now for generating hydrogen - so the amount of energy needed to produce hydrogen is far less than a decade or so ago. Having said all that, fuel cell technology is still expensive, but I am guessing that it is possibly cheaper than buying a whole lot of batteries.
      Lachmund
      • 2 Years Ago
      amazing. this tech is the future. no alibis
      JakeY
      • 2 Years Ago
      If it's only for "private and public lease by the end of 2012" how is it any more of a "production" vehicle than the Honda Clarity (or any of the CARB ZEV lease only vehicles). It should at least be for sale to be considered a production vehicle.
        Dave
        • 2 Years Ago
        @JakeY
        The fact that they're not selling it does not mean they are not producing it. Note that the root word of production is produce.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dave
          It's an argument over whether the Hyundai qualifies as a "production" vehicle or not. It clearly meets the definition of being produced on a production line to identical specifications, which means that they aren't prototypes. They are able to be driven legally on the public roads - the only complaint up is whether or not being leased rather than being sold outright has any relevance to the categorization. So yes, I'd call that pedantic, as in"overly concerned with minute details or formalisms." If you're unwilling to call it a a production vehicle, then how *would* you classify it?
          Dave
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dave
          Apparently, the HMMV, the army Jeep, the Mail Jeep, the UPS truck, the Grumman LLV, etc are not production vehicles because they are/were not sold to individuals, even though each is/was produced in the tens or hundreds of thousands.
          JakeY
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dave
          According to wikipedia: "The characteristics of a production vehicle or production car are mass produced identical models, offered for sale to the public, and able to be legally driven on public roads (street legal)." Emphasis on "sale to the public". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Production_vehicle FIA definition: "cars of which the series-production of a certain number of identical (see definition of this word hereafter) cars, has been completed within a certain period of time, and which are meant for the normal sale (see below) to the individual purchaser." http://argent.fia.com/web/fia-public.nsf/688871134DFCB847C12574A5003A1E8B/$FILE/Hist_App_J_69_Art_252_a.pdf Emphasis on "normal sale" defined as "means the distribution of cars to individual purchasers through the normal commercial channels of the manufacturer". In both cases, the definition of a production vehicle is tied to the sale of the vehicle to individual customers. The minimum unit is 25 units according to the FIA, and 20 for Wikipedia. You can't simply produce a vehicle and not sell it to the general public (as is done for internal or governmental test fleets) and have it considered a "production vehicle".
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dave
          Jakey is rejoicing in being pedantic.
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dave
          The fuel cell world . . . where being accurate is 'pedantic'. Build those castles in the sky!
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dave
          It seems absurd to limit the definition of a production vehicle by whether it is sold or leased. Either way, the Hyundai FCV will be made on a production line, produced to identical repeatable specifications, and be able to be legally registered and driven on public roads. /silly argument - Honda did it first anyway
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dave
          JakeY is having fun being pedantic. What harm is there in that?
      Chris M
      • 2 Years Ago
      "Serial production" means one at a time, low volume. They're not the first, Honda is, even though Honda produced far fewer FCX Claritys than they'd originally planned. I suspect Hyundai will also end up making far fewer than they'd originally planned, too. But even if they do manage to produce 1,000, the BEVs and Plug-in Hybrids will still vastly outnumber fuel cell vehicles by the end of 2015. The number of charging outlets will also vastly outnumber the number of H2 fueling stations - hey, the Tesla Superchargers alone will vastly outnumber the H2 fueling stations by the end of 2015!
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Chris M
        Since Hyundai have hit every target they have set so far, there would seem little grounds for your pessimism. Initial deployment: 'H2StationĀ® CAR-100 provides 70MPa SAE J2601 compliant fast-fill of hydrogen for passenger vehicles with a capacity of up to 100kg/day. All equipment is integrated into a compact station module allowing for easy transport and installation in only two days. This significantly reduces both the investment cost and time from contract to start of operation, which is important when deploying station networks. As fuel sales in a network grows and reach a level feasible for larger stations the CAR-100 can easily be relocated to outskirts of the network.' http://fuelcellsworks.com/news/2012/09/25/h2-logic-launches-new-h2station%C2%AE-products-for-hydrogen-refueling-of-fuel-cell-powered-material-handling-vehicles-and-passenger-vehicles/ Note that these can be deployed on a rolling basis, so that as hydrogen becomes established in an early adopter area they can move on elsewhere. 100kg/day would be enough to service a couple of hundred vehicles at 30/miles/day. That sounds an EASIER roll out to me than a fast charger infrastructure. The hydrogen for that level of use would be brought in by tanker. No need to upgrade transmission systems or transformers for a high speed electric charging station. And: 'The aim is to bring down the cost to that of a natural gas filling station, around 300,000 euros, or $387,500, from around 1 million euros today, said Ulrich Buenger, a coordinator at the European Hydrogen Road Tour 2012, which is funded by industry and the European Commission.' http://www.mercurynews.com/cars/ci_21628374/hyundai-introduce-worlds-first-production-fuel-cell-electric Those cost statements are not just figures plucked from the air, but a result of analysis of the components needed to build them. Europe already has a perfectly adequate infrastructure to deliver LNG for vehicles, and whilst the cost of a hydrogen roll out may for the time being be somewhat higher, vast amounts can be saved on oil import bills, for instance by the use of hydrogen from agricultural and municipal waste. In addition: I have recently found out that more than half of German vehicle miles are for longer journeys, with the differences between that usage pattern and that of the US presumably due to their excellent public transport covering a lot of commuting. In that case present battery cars would not help much for more than half of the miles travelled, so particularly with electricity at 30 cents/kwh it is hardly surprising that they are keener on fuel cells than battery cars.
          krona2k
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          But they haven't hit every target, because the original press release for this very vehicle stated they would *sell* 1000 vehicles in *2012*
          krona2k
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Sorry - they said they would sell 500 this year: http://www.fuelcellinsider.org/?p=229 Now it doesn't look like they will *sell* any this year, right?
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Are you bitching about an error in a press release, translated from the Korean? Get real!
          krona2k
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Sorry, slight error in my previous post - they said they would sell 500 this year: http://www.fuelcellinsider.org/?p=229 Now it doesn't look like they will *sell* any this year, right?
      usbseawolf2000
      • 2 Years Ago
      This must be the $50k FCEV that they mentioned. It looks like Hyundai and Nissan will start with SUV and Honda and Toyota (FCV-R) will start with sedans. Finally these are the electric cars that need no range extender because hydrogen refills in minutes. They won't weight a lot more than hybrids, if not lighter!
        Letstakeawalk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @usbseawolf2000
        "They won't weight a lot more than hybrids, if not lighter!" The Toyota FCHV-adv has a curb weight of 4145lbs, the Highlander Hybrid (with 4wd) weighs 4641lbs. The FCHV-adv gets about 65mpgge, the Hybrid gets 28mpg.
      Snark
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hydrogen is energetically unfavorable and a silly waste - regardless of what the boosters would have you believe - but I do like the updated styling on this.
        Snark
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Snark
        Just to weigh in, and to hopefully counterbalance some of the blatant spin in this thread.... I'm an environmental scientist, and the bottom line is that hydrogen is either a massive waste of energy or dependent utterly on CNG, thus neutralizing its carbon neutrality and environmental friendliness. The notion that hydrogen is efficient and clean is predicated on a blinkered tank-to-wheel analysis of how clean it's oxidized in the fuel cell, not in a full well-to-wheel accounting of the feedstock and inputs needed to create the hydrogen. Hydrogen is indeed very clean and zero-emissions, but then so are a lot of alternative energy sources that one could name - like an EV charged off solar panels or nuclear power. If you really want a clean way to power cars with CNG, just build solid oxide fuel cells to generate clean electricity at rapid-charging stations for EVs and PHEVs. CNG derived hydrogen has a well-to-wheel embodied energy of 5-6000 BTU/mile, no better than a Prius. Electrolysis-derived hydrogen runs at about 10-12,000 BTU/mile. Electric cars charged off US grid mix are somewhere between 2-5000 BTU/mile, depending on source. The numbers are cold and hard and don't lie: if we're taking seriously the notion that energy is not a limitless resource, and that we've got to use less of it and generate what we use cleanly, hydrogen isn't really that sensible. It's no more energy efficient than a diesel, and that's when you're making it out of a (finite, environmentally damaging) fossil fuel. Also, I'm no Milton Friedman, but the market does do a pretty good job at sorting out supply and demand. If hydrogen worked, the technology is there; we could have hydrogen cars that cost about as much as a Volt on the road now if we wanted to. But aside from Hyundai, almost every major OEM is moving away from hydrogen and pursuing EVs and PHEVs. After pursuing FCEV tech all through the 90s and early 00s, most of these programs are moribund. And Hyundai - the major carmaker in a geographically tiny but relatively affluent country - may just be the exception to the rule. If I were feeling like a gambling man and wanted to make hydrogen work, I'd pick a small, wealthy Asian country to do it in - NOT the US or Europe or any developing market.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Snark
          Lovely dismissal of several multi-billion dollar programs, Snark. I see you live up to your nom de plume.
          Wayne Gilbert
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Snark
          Snark you dont have a clue what you are talking about. Why do you even care about this since you clearly dont have any facts? I figure you must be connected to big oil somehow and are upset you will be losing money though its taking a lot longer than it should since big oil has their fingers in every politicians pocket. Sorry little one, Hydrogen is the future and no amount of misinformation losers like you can try to push the technology is there, its proven and just like the combustion engine, it will get better over time.
          Snark
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Snark
          "I suppose you can be forgiven for being ignorant of the very lively FCV programs at Daimler, GM, Toyota, Honda, and Nissan." You must have a different definition of lively, Letstakeawalk. I'm perfectly aware that those manufacturers maintain small shops, mostly for marketing purposes. And they might - though most of them haven't - leased a few prototypes to people and institutions here and there. But they're not lively programs to the extent that every manufacturer's EV and PHEV program is. And it's no coincidence that most of the manufacturers that are still even slightly interested in fuel cells are Japanese and Korean. It's a different market over there. Fuel cells might, despite their flaws, make sense there for certain applications.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Snark
          Real scientists understand that you need to reference figures you churn out. Otherwise they are so much wallpaper, but thanks for playing.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Snark
          "If you really want a clean way to power cars with CNG, just build solid oxide fuel cells to generate clean electricity at rapid-charging stations for EVs and PHEVs." That's going to happen, no doubt. But you forget the third stream that is available from a SOFC run in tri-generation. Heat, Electricity, and Hydrogen. All produced very cleanly. So, we have a station that can provide both electricity to BEVs (and the grid) as well as clean hydrogen for FCVs. http://energy.gov/articles/fuel-station-future-innovative-approach-fuel-cell-technology-unveiled-california http://www.renewableenergyfocus.com/view/24574/fuelcell-energy-and-air-products-to-market-trigeneration-stationary-fuel-cell-power-plants/ "But aside from Hyundai, almost every major OEM is moving away from hydrogen and pursuing EVs and PHEVs. After pursuing FCEV tech all through the 90s and early 00s, most of these programs are moribund." If you're not a regular reader of this site, or others like it, I suppose you can be forgiven for being ignorant of the very lively FCV programs at Daimler, GM, Toyota, Honda, and Nissan.
      Nowuries
      • 2 Years Ago
      Great job Hyundai, keep up the good work! I personally don't care if the Clarity can take first to the race honors, all I care about is getting rid of our dependence on foreign oil and hybrid vehicles.
      BB79826
      • 2 Years Ago
      Nice front end. Is the Tucson gonna get this nose, too?
        Letstakeawalk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @BB79826
        Very similar; the US model has a chrome bar added in the grille. https://www.hyundaiusa.com/vehicles/2013/tucson/?
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