Ford has revealed that it is updating the base powerplant on its 2013 Police Interceptor sedan. Ford's 3.7-liter Ti-VCT V6 engine will replace the naturally aspirated 3.5-liter V6 engine in its Taurus cop car, and the new engine will slot under the optional twin-turbo 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6.

The V6 offered is a version of the powerplant found in the base Mustang and F-150, and it was already available on Ford's Police Interceptor Utility (read: enforcement-spec Explorer). With the help of twin independent variable camshaft timing, the 3.7-liter V6 makes 305 horsepower and 279 pound-feet of torque. It puts up these numbers while achieving 18 miles per gallon city, 25 mpg highway. Combined fuel economy is 21 mpg.

According to Ford, the 3.7-liter provides the highest output of any naturally aspirated V6 pursuit engine. The change should improve its 0–60 time, especially compared to competing six-cylinder pursuit vehicles. If you recall, the outgoing 288-hp 3.5-liter V6 resulted in a 0–60 run of 8.36 seconds, well behind the 7.34 of the Chevrolet Caprice PPV V6 (301 hp), and the 7.68 of the Dodge Charger Pursuit V6 (292 hp). The new 3.7-liter mill should put the Ford Police Interceptor in that range, though we do not yet have those numbers.

If a police department decides that 305 horsepower is not enough to chase down perpetrators, Ford still offers its 3.5-liter EcoBoost engine with 365 horsepower, and it's still the only twin-turbocharged V6 engine being offered in America's police vehicle fleet. For more information on the naturally aspirated V6, click below to read through the press release.
Show full PR text
Ford Boosts Police Interceptor Sedan Performance and Fuel Economy with New 3.7-Liter Ti-VCT Engine

· Ford Police Interceptor sedan now available with 3.7-liter twin independent variable camshaft timing (Ti-VCT) engine offering increased power with fuel efficiency

· Standard all-wheel-drive sedan with 3.7-liter Ti-VCT engine offers EPA-rated 25 mpg on the highway, 18 mpg in the city and a combined 21 mpg – an improvement over current powertrain lineup

· Both Ford Police Interceptors, sedan and utility vehicle, recently earned top safety ratings in the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's New Car Assessment Program testing, which combines vehicle performance in frontal and side-impact crash tests and resistance to rollover


DEARBORN, Mich., Sept. 13, 2012 – The new Ford Police Interceptor is getting another boost under the hood with the addition of the 3.7-liter twin independent variable camshaft timing (Ti-VCT) engine, offering law enforcement agencies fuel economy with more power.

The 3.7-liter V6, now available on the Police Interceptor sedan, delivers a performance increase to 305 horsepower and 279 lb.-ft. of torque while also achieving increased fuel economy of 25 mpg on the highway, 18 mpg in the city and 21 mpg combined. The horsepower and torque ratings are the highest of any naturally aspirated V6 engine offered for pursuit-rated sedans.

"This combination of great performance and top-notch fuel economy means law enforcement agencies won't have to compromise power or fuel efficiency while getting the job done," said Bill Gubing, chief engineer for Police Interceptor.

A tough lineup
Ford's Police Interceptor engine strategy provides a V6 lineup that performs better than V8 engines of years past. The Police Interceptor sedan lineup now comes with three powertrain options, allowing police to choose the powerhouse that best meets their patrol requirements. The Police Interceptor sedan is available with a standard 3.5-liter V6, the new 3.7-liter V6 and the performance powerhouse 3.5-liter V6 EcoBoost® engine.

The 3.7-liter engine now available on the sedan was already available on the Police Interceptor utility vehicle.

To develop the all-new Police Interceptor, Ford engineers worked hand-in-hand with Ford's Police Advisory Board of law enforcement professionals, who provided input on key vehicle attributes such as safety, performance, durability, driver comfort and functionality.

Safe, durable, functional
Building on Ford's safety leadership, Police Interceptor is engineered to pass 75-mph rear-end crash testing.

Both sedan and utility Police Interceptors recently earned top safety ratings in the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's New Car Assessment Program testing, which combines vehicle performance in frontal and side-impact crash tests and resistance to rollover.

Throughout its development, Ford's new Police Interceptor has been put through the paces, undergoing a battery of torture tests to ensure its individual components can hold up to the rigorous driving styles of police professionals.

To meet the rigors of durability testing, the unique police brakes have been increased in size and performance for confidence. The cooling package is purpose-built as well, featuring a heavy-duty alternator and larger radiator. Its honeycomb grille is designed to work in harmony with the interior components, offering more airflow throughout the vehicle. Plus, the standard 18-inch steel wheels are vented, designed to work in concert with the enhanced brake system.

Front seats have been specially designed, with a lower bolster removed to better accommodate officers' utility belts. Inserted into the seatback are anti-stab plates, designed to protect front-seat occupants.

The Police Interceptor second row also has been optimized to address police-specific needs. The vinyl seats are specially sculpted and set back to improve second-row space and maximize legroom. The back door hinges are modified to open up another 10 degrees versus traditional rear doors.

The Ford Police Interceptor also is equipped with a column shift specifically designed so the console area is free for the ever-increasing amounts of aftermarket police equipment necessary for officers to do their jobs.


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  • 42 Comments
      A P
      • 2 Years Ago
      One of the reasons that the PI and Charger police cars will always outsell the new Caprice for police duty is believe it or not, the Chevy wont come with a column gearshift...it will have an offset unit but that is not good enough for most cities. The floor shift gets in the way of the computers that most forces have. Speed is really not needed that much like others have said...the CVPI was not fast at all but it was big, steady and very durable. There will always be a need for interceptor units for Highway Patrol uses but most will just need the V6.
      carguy1701
      • 2 Years Ago
      That would be nice if the Taurus weren't FWD and not a piece of crap.
      That Guy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Really AutoBlog? "Taurus-based"? The Explorer is "Taurus based" , The Flex is "Taurus-based". This half-assed police car IS a Taurus. And it's an absolutely terrible police car. I sat in one and the visability is absolutely horrid. And that's before the police equipment gets added. The thin, sorry excuses for windows are very dangerous. Secondly, the trunk is a joke. The proper Crown Vic had a massive trunk, this Taurus is tiny. Ford really dropped the ball with the Taurus PI. Once agencies get over the flash in the pan excitement and realize how badly Ford f-ed this up, they will switch back to the proper police cars.
        merlot066
        • 2 Years Ago
        @That Guy
        The Police Interceptor is Taurus-based, the Explorer is D3-based, the Flex is D3-based. I'm sure you haven't sat in one. The Police Interceptor has 20.1 cubic feet of cargo space, the Charger has 15.4, the Caprice has 17.4 Final point, piss off.
          That Guy
          • 2 Years Ago
          @merlot066
          Well, once again you are completely wrong. Your mom shouldn’t let you play on the internet, all you do is make a fool of yourself. Secondly, this is, indeed a Taurus. It looks like a Taurus, is built on the same exact line as a Taurus. This is like saying that the new Chevy Captive Sport is not an old Vue. Only ignorance would make you call this a “Police Interceptor Sedan”. And this is most certainly due to sales. Ford has to keep the lights on in their Chicago appliance factory, and fleet sales are needed to do that. The Explorer and Taurus have mediocre sales. Plus, the old Crown Vic, like the Ranger, did not fit into Ford’s business plan of “planned obsolescence”. The Taurus and Explorer will not hold up under police work. They will fail. Hell, the weak AWD system fails when used. So, with these things braking all the time, Ford will not only ensure the mechanics have jobs, but by pricing these appliances so cheaply, they will ensure that citys keep buying the because Ford will have the lowest bid. As for the trunk, it’s awful. The factory mounted slide out tray (that’s hardly sturdy enough to hold hamburger buns) eats up a lot of room. The trunk is basically unusable. And I know exactly what my city’s 15 squads carry in the trunk. It will not be easy to get things in and out. Again, Ford just doesn’t care. We all know Ford could care less about reliability, durability, or even the safety of the people driving them. All they want to do is make short term money. If Ford focused an ounce on the long term however, they would realize that they would make even more money. Big Al needs to be fired ASAP. Accepting complacency and mediocrity like he does will be the end of Ford.
          merlot066
          • 2 Years Ago
          @merlot066
          Taurus is the #2/#3 selling large sedan, the Explorer is the #1 selling large crossover and the Explorer has a huge export market around the world (the Explorer made in America is exported to Bolivia, Canada, Mexico, Dominican Republic, Japan, South Korea, Israel, The Philippines, Russia, Iceland, the Middle East, and certain countries in South America and Africa). Your turn...
        ebn.hahn
        • 2 Years Ago
        @That Guy
        OK That Guy aka "the Realist". You big TURDDD. When you blab your mouth, give some numbers. But since we know better we expect nothing out of a "Walking Talking REKTUM" refer to himself as " that Guy". Well I will give you some numbers that will hopefully make you crawl back under the rock you live under!!. and hopefully disappear for good... August YTD sales: Taurus PI (5251), Crown Vic (3010), Caprice PPV (2411). And the Taurus PI started selling this year, the PPI was selling last year (sold 358 and August 2011) Source: Goodcarbadcar.net. What do think B#$@ch
        imoore
        • 2 Years Ago
        @That Guy
        @ That Guy: Ford prefers to not identify its PI as a Taurus, but rather Taurus-based. That's why. Blame Ford for this, not the messenger.
      frost54661
      • 2 Years Ago
      Incorrect. Ford is offering the 3.5L as the base engine, you can upgrade to the 3.7L, or 3.5L EcoBoost.
        frost54661
        • 2 Years Ago
        @frost54661
        Forgot to add that Chrysler will offer AWD with the Charger for 2014 as well. 5.7L models only thus far. I'd expect the V-6 too.
      ken
      • 2 Years Ago
      Police pursuit isn't all about speed. Accurate information feed and well planning are more important than fast cars. Sometimes you just need to take a good look of the driver and passengers, and then wait for them at their homes.
      Ducman69
      • 2 Years Ago
      Considering how often police officers sit with their engine idling, it makes no sense to me that they would choose any vehicle that wasn't a hybrid. Here, Sugar Land police just upgraded their entire fleet to gigantic Chevy Tahoes, which might be fun for the cops but means I have to pay out the ass to fuel their monstrosities.
        carmicheals
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        Those Tahoes get better mileage than the Crown Vics they replaced... http://www.michigan.gov/documents/msp/006Pages_from_VehicleTestBook2011_Web_mil_-_Fuel_Economy_341047_7.pdf
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Cruising
      • 2 Years Ago
      this car puts those ancient robocop taurus's to shame.
      macfreakbudda
      • 2 Years Ago
      THESE ARE NOT TAURUSES OR EXPLORERS! Ford no longer modifies stock vehicles for police work, these are separately assembled purpose-built police vehicles. The only thing they share with Taurus and Explorer are the body panels. I test drove an Explorer and was impressed earlier in the year. About 6 weeks ago I was issued an Interceptor Utility and I can assure you, it is a different beast. I also oversee the equipment installs for my agency and can attest to everything underneath the trim and panels are different as well. Please get your facts straight before reporting.
        davidhall1013
        • 1 Year Ago
        @macfreakbudda
        ford had to mod the rear doors on the tauruses because the stock doors were too small to put anyone in the rear. there fore the body has been mod'd too. i saw the news story when they first said that the taurus would replace the c.v.
        davidhall1013
        • 1 Year Ago
        @macfreakbudda
        ive owned a 98 cv pi since 02 and ill still keep it. 210,000 miles and no major repairs. uses no oil between changes either. no smoke. i baby it and will prob get another 100,000 easy.
        007 Vodka Martini
        • 2 Years Ago
        @macfreakbudda
        You are about 8% correct...
      Avinash Machado
      • 2 Years Ago
      Matt never misses an opportunity to bash Ford,does he?
      Toneron
      • 2 Years Ago
      Base Impala (W platform circa 1988) -- 300 HP.
        jtav2002
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Toneron
        The Impala is such an irrelevant car. Especially for police use now with the new Impala coming out and the Caprice PPV out I doubt there will be any future police Impala's.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        jtav2002
        • 2 Years Ago
        Yea. a V8 Charger costs a department rougly $26k. Highly doubt they could get M3's for that?
        imoore
        • 2 Years Ago
        Economy cars are not good for high-speed pursuits. BMW's are too expensive. And with the room of the big cars, you don't need to wait for a paddy wagon to haul pers away.
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