Before we get started, we feel the need to repeat the standard issue warning about automotive stupidity: Do not try what's shown in this video, and if you do, make sure it's in the safe confines of a legitimate track facility.

One individual recently learned firsthand what happens when you remove the factory's 112-mph speed limiter on the Ford Mustang V6 and proceed to accelerate to 135 mph. The vehicle lost its driveshaft, which turned itself into a spinning hunk of metal that tore into the floorpan, bashed through its interior bits and generally caused mechanical mayhem.

The term for this type of failure is "catastrophic."

So, what happened? Well, we might first point out that the driver of this particular Mustang was clearly still accelerating after the drivetrain started making suspect noises – never a good idea. We have to imagine the vehicle was vibrating like an overloaded Magic Fingers bed before things went sideways.

As it turns out, the 305-horsepower and 280-pound-feet of torque 3.7-liter V6 Mustang is built with a 2.73 rear gear ratio and a lightweight, one-piece driveshaft that's engineered to toe the line between fuel economy and performance. That driveshaft is part of the recipe that allows the coupe to yield 31 mpg highway – it simply isn't built to handle the type of speeds the owner in the video after the jump submitted it to.

In a statement to Autoblog, Ford said that the Mustang V6 is "the ultimate in fuel economy and performance," noting that owners looking for more speed should look toward the Mustang GT with its 412-horsepower V8, heavy-duty two-piece drive shaft and variety of rear axle ratio choices. The Mustang GT is speed limited to 145 mph from the factory.

As an aside, we would also like to point out the idiocy of trying to film oneself at triple digits by hand. While the YouTube description says that the impromptu test course is a "closed" road, it looks like it might be a public roadway. The videographer is lucky to be alive. Keep it on the track, people, and hit the jump to see the clip for yourself.



I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 421 Comments
      ngiotta
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is precisely why I have a driveshaft safety loop on my 2006 GT (and my 1967 Mustang as well). $45 and 45min of labor = cheap insurance if you like pushing your car harder than what it was intended for. In all likelihood, this isn't a matter of the driveshaft not being able to handle over 112mph. It's most likely a case of minor damage to the driveshaft or ujoint bearings during the 17,000 miles on the odometer. The slightest balance issue at those speeds can cause a drive shaft to shake itself apart.
      timbrands
      • 3 Years Ago
      What a bunch of trolls. The Mustang V6 has a limited top speed for several reasons, not everything is engineered for 130+. The engine can, and if you want to spend a few thousand to make the car track ready it will be too. It's be more cost effective just to get a GT from the get-go. If you want to go racing at high speeds, get a GT, BOSS 302, or a GT500........the "go faster" stuff is included. The guy in this video is a moron for all the reasons already mentioned. The Raptor drivers that had bent frames were morons too. They were doing 11/10s on a course they didn't inspect before hand. A regular F150/RAM or Chevy would have been trashed. MFT is only available on the top level cars, but still it was a problem for more than a few. There's a new beta version being released for current users, of course the new release will be installed on new 2012 vehicles. The "glass" manual transmission problem is 3% of all 5.0 Mustang 2011/2012s. Some were probably abused, some were probably defective. The manual is made in China, true. The automatic is USA, and just as fast btw.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @timbrands
        [blocked]
          Dean Hammond
          • 3 Years Ago
          actually you are twisting the truth. Write this down please, because it has been adressed with YOU before. You STILL have the factory 3year bumper to bumper. Its the 5yr 60000 POWERTRAIN warranty that gets nixed.
          jtav2002
          • 3 Years Ago
          Use of the key alone will shorten the powertrain warranty to 3 years 36k miles. The only way it's voided completely is if you mod the car after you receive a track key.
      jonkolo13
      • 3 Years Ago
      Come on! We all know that the aftermarket performance aluminum driveshafts are about 20lbs lighter. Fuel efficiency, give me a break! It's more like cost cutting! A lot of these cars are driven in places where driving at 150MPH and higher speeds is a normal part of everyday life. American's post speed limits instead of teaching people how to drive!
      50 AKA Ferrari
      • 3 Years Ago
      The OWNER of this car is wrong. There is a limiter on that car for a REASON. The model is designed for FUEL ECONOMY., not racing. He has embarrassed himself and his family who has to claim him as a relative for bashing Ford. And I'm a GM guy saying that.
        Varcity
        • 3 Years Ago
        @50 AKA Ferrari
        That is stupid!!! But ignorance is bliss I guess. So if a mustang V6 driveshaft fails and the owner happens to have a cold air intake then it's the owner's fault? LOL yeah right, keep defending the shitty quality. I don't see this kind of **** happening to German and Japanese cars. Seriously, its a fuckin mustang, Ford KNEW it would be modified, how much did they care about your safety? lol
      Waltzon
      • 3 Years Ago
      And in other news, scientists have now determined that any car, from any manufacturer, can be broken by a moron hoping to look cool on YouTube.
      brgtlm
      • 3 Years Ago
      Gets what he deserves especially on a public roadway.
      Ben Hayat
      • 3 Years Ago
      Damn, scared the $hit out of me... :-)
      AP1_S2K
      • 3 Years Ago
      that video also captured a guy who cr*pped in his pants at 130+ mph
      donnieorama
      • 3 Years Ago
      That was a genius move.
      merlot066
      • 3 Years Ago
      Much like the bent Raptor frames, every vehicle has a limit. However, it might be a good idea for Ford to offer a heavy duty driveshaft for people who want to upgrade the specs on the V6 model. Now that gas prices are so high and the 3.7L is such an awesome engine they may find more people beefing up the V6 rather than the GT.
        dirtyblueshirt
        • 3 Years Ago
        @merlot066
        They do offer a heavy duty driveshaft. it's called the Mustang GT. If you're going to spend that much on upgrading the drivetrain on a V6, you'd be better off starting with the V8. It'd be cheaper than upgrading the V6's parts.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @merlot066
        [blocked]
          merlot066
          • 3 Years Ago
          Really? They took them to the same course as the commercial? That's interesting, I never knew where that track was. I also don't recall them jumping cattle grates at 80+ MPH on the commercials either. I seem to recall that most, if not all, of the trucks that had bent frames also had aftermarket suspension components which removed a safety feature built into the truck's suspension, much like the situation here where the person removed the top speed limiter from the factory.
        jonkolo13
        • 3 Years Ago
        @merlot066
        True, it should already be part of the performance package!
      hevace
      • 3 Years Ago
      In short, the current Mustang V6 is not engineered to the lofty standards set by the Mustang II of the 70's.
      jonkolo13
      • 3 Years Ago
      The fact that Ford limited the Mustrang to a slower top speed then it's even more fuel efficient Fiesta and Focus models (118MPH-Car and Driver)) is a major red flag to a design shortcoming. Even a new $23K Honda Civic tops out at 137MPH without breaking! (Car and Driver)
    • Load More Comments