2012 Volkswagen Tiguan – Click above for high-res image gallery

Volkswagen
is reportedly seriously considering moving production of its compact Tiguan crossover to this side of the pond in an effort to cut costs. If the Tiguan moves to North America, it will likely be built alongside the Jetta and Passat. By moving production of the small CUV here, Volkswagen would cut down on shipping and labor costs, as well as put its plants closer to some parts suppliers.

According to Automotive News, VW execs hope such a move would stop exchange rate fluctuations diminishing profits from the world's number two car market and allow it to better stay ahead of consumer trends. The proposed move of Tiguan production coincides with the opening of VW's new $1 billion plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee. If everything goes according to plan, the new plant will crank out 150,000 vehicles a year starting in 2012.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 24 Comments
      NightFlight
      • 3 Years Ago
      Maybe then they can price it where it makes sense and people will actually buy it. The current pricing on the Tiguan is outrageous. You have to spend $27,000 to even be able to have 4Motion as an option. Higher trim lines are bumping up against the Q5, RDX, GLK, XC60, etc. It doesn't make sense.
      lojkyelo
      • 3 Years Ago
      So does this mean that it will be built like a Jetta? If so, what's the point...
      SpikedLemon
      • 3 Years Ago
      Here's hoping it keeps its Golf roots instead of sharing too much w/ the Jetta.
      tenspeeder
      • 3 Years Ago
      A midlevel SE model with sunroof and AWD and vinyl..oops I mean leatherette interior >$33k yikes! No wonder they sell so poorly
      te3
      • 3 Years Ago
      first!
      te3
      • 3 Years Ago
      first!
      tantareanujellob
      • 3 Years Ago
      Let me guess, engine options will include the 2.slow, a 5 cylinder with 90s tech and a tractor mo... I mean TDI. Interior will be manufactured by Fisher Price and it'll have drum brakes.
      Scr
      • 3 Years Ago
      They still make these? How many did they sell...five?
      tantareanujellob
      • 3 Years Ago
      How about a Jetta or Passat that doesn't suck. Crazy idea, i know.
        rocketmoose
        • 3 Years Ago
        @tantareanujellob
        New American Passat doesn't suck. Can't say I'm too pleased about lack of 4motion/Wagon variants though. But I wont defend the Jetta. Still, though, it is helping them reach their sales targets, and the GLI is back for the fans of the old, better, more expensive Jetta.
        Lachmund
        • 3 Years Ago
        @tantareanujellob
        move to europe!
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      m5nm3
      • 3 Years Ago
      only ppl I see driving these cars are usually young women. Looks pretty nice but I think it's overpriced.
      ccweems
      • 3 Years Ago
      You'll know VW is serious about US production when they source all vehicles worldwide in Tennessee. That will mean the US production meets all quality standards and in fact is the low cost producer. That is what MB and BMW have largely done (there are multiple 3 series production locations) and to great effect. Now that many German OEM's are in the US VW should find it easy to build cars here that meet German expectations. Should VW decide that US production is only for US consumption then that is the code phrase that means "We do not expect the demanding German market to buy the American crap they produce there". Competitive makes have had a good reception for the models made in the US and shipped abroad. The first gen ML was an exception because the initial production was crap as seen by all.
        Carlos Cruz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ccweems
        Why would VW make products aimed for the European market here? The products meant for production in Tennessee would be economical models aimed at the masses with an appealing price. Not luxury products. Some VW loyalists already are not liking the fact that VW is now designing cars to compete with Toyota and Honda and therefore making products with a more "bland" design and cheaper materials. BMW and MB operations here are a little different though, they kept their upscale design and quality, their vehicles did not suffer as much. Im hoping that just like their brothers from Deutschland, and American Audi plant wont mean a crappy product. I am not against a US workforce, but we have to be realistic with what VW is willing to outsource to the US and how much quality are we to expect from a workforce that makes $15 per hour, on a plant that is all about cost cutting. "We do not expect the demanding German market to buy the American crap they produce there", funny you mention that, since a lot of people I know feel that way about American products, myself included.
        Jake
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ccweems
        "We do not expect the demanding German market to buy the American crap they produce there". Is that why nearly every American brand, except the ones destroyed by a German company, outclass every German brand on any quality or reliability rating? I don't want "German expectations", or expect to dump thousands of dollars a year repairing your German made car once it hits about 50k miles.
          Carlos Cruz
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Jake
          I usually do not keep cars for long, but I've seen my share of Jetta TDIs get to the 200,000 mile mark and beyond... also, when I was younger I would go to my dad's shop and almost exclusively see cars from the big 3 in detroit come in for major service, while the japs and euro vehicles came in for maintenance. This is still the case for the majority of the time. My first car was a Mexican made MK4 Jetta and I had it until almost 160,000 with no problems. Historically speaking, American car makers have been of low quality until they received a wake-up call in 2008. Maybe they have improved, but as of now, Gen Y grew up in a world in which the big 3 were regarded as low quality vehicles, and in a world in which Toyota and Honda were a synonym for quality and reliability. Its going to take some time for me, or anyone that I know my age actually consider purchasing an American car.
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