13 Articles

The study took place, but it wasn’t quite what reports are making it out to be.

The notion that VW was exposing humans to diesel tailpipe emissions makes for a great headline with powerful historical connotations, but it's simply not true based on the information we have right now.

Official

But the CEO has the backing of the Porsche and Piech families and will stay

But the CEO will stay on.

Report

We don't know how many jobs will be lost in North America yet.

Volkswagen's way forward lies in electric vehicles and mobility services, and these segments will be boosted by 9,000 new jobs in Germany.

Official

Detroit Diesel will spend over $28M to clean up NOx other pollutants.

The fine is equivalent to $3,660 per uncertified diesel engine.

Report

Stefan Knirsch was Audi's head of technical development.

He's already been asked to clean out his desk.

Report

Germany also suggests the EC have another chat with Italian authorities.

Under suspicion: Fiat 500X, Fiat Doblo, and Jeep Renegade.

ETC

Historical precedent gives us the answer, and it may not be pretty.

If VW can't fix its diesels, they may go the way of the dodo and the '87-'90 Nissan Van.

Official

Dealers will finally get compensated for the cars they weren't allowed to sell.

Report

New stakeholder Nissan is also planning on Mitsubishi improvements.

One investigator said it was a 'collective failure.'

Report

If American TDI owners will get $7,000, then so should European ones.

An EU commissioner says that VW should treat each side of the Atlantic the same when it comes to diesel scandal customer payments.

Legal action taking place in Norway and South Korea, to name just two places.

This just keeps getting bigger. A VW executive is arrested in South Korea over the diesel scandal, while Nissan sues Korea and Norway sues VW over diesels.

Report

VW's official plan to US regulators will be submitted June 28.

Early rumors of the deal VW has struck with US regulators would see it pay diesel owners up to $7,000 per vehicle in a plan that could cost $10 billion.

Report

US government is asking the German automaker for details on diesels.

The EPA has asked Daimler AG for more information on the emissions of some diesel vehicles in the US. There's no probe or claim of wrongdoing, yet.