3LT 2dr Convertible
2019 Chevrolet Camaro

2019 Camaro Photos
7.5
Autoblog Rating

Chevy's pony car is a divisive one. It’s fast on the track, but makes sacrifices as a daily driver. One thing’s for sure: it ain’t boring.

Industry
8.5
MALIBU, Calif. — The updated 2019 Camaro SS might be the third-best-selling muscle car, behind the Dodge Challenger and the Ford Mustang, but it makes a mighty bid for relevance. That's due in large part to the enthusiasm of guys like Mr. Camaro himself — Chevrolet chief engineer Al Oppenheiser, sitting with me at breakfast ahead of my first drive of the new 2019 Chevy Camaro SS 10-speed. "Here are a few pics of my garage," he gushed, sharing cellphone snaps of his multi-generational stash of Camaros, which include the crown jewel, a lovingly restored and gorgeous 1968 SS convertible. So he knows muscle. And the 2019 SS ($37,000) is a large-displacement monster stalking the land that turbochargers forgot. We're talking 6.2 liters of growly, burbly, naturally aspirated V8 power producing a stout 455 hp and 455 lb-ft. And yes, you can pair the mighty mill with a good old-fashioned manual transmission. The facelifted iteration of the sixth-generation Camaro that debuted in 2016 adds an available 10-speed automatic gearbox, revised front and rear ends with new LED taillamps, updated 20-inch wheels and a new third-gen infotainment system. But before you go bashing the two-pedal setup, spoiler alert: This is no uninspired slushbox. It's actually really good. The multi-clutch 10-speed was co-developed initially with Ford (go figure), and claims shifts in as little as 150 milliseconds — faster than Porsche's PDK dual-clutch. Interestingly, Oppenheiser says he was so impressed with Porsche's predictive tachometer, which blips down to meet the projected rpm in the next gear, that the feature was incorporated into Camaro. For what it's worth, the Camaro's new mask-like face has gleaned more than its share of controversy. However, haters should note that the so-called Flowtie — introduced on the 2014 Camaro Z/28 — serves a functional purpose by channeling up to 3 cubic meters of air per minute through the front end. Nifty. The Camaro SS's cabin is immersive — and not necessarily in a good way. Shut those big heavy doors, and the high sills makes you feel like you're sitting deep within the vehicle, with large haunches and C-pillars obscuring quite a bit of rear visibility. New for '19 is an available digital rearview mirror that goes a long way towards remedying those notorious blindspots. Even in the convertible version, which has a relatively small rear window opening with the top up, flipping the mirrors to digital mode provides a much-needed boost in confidence and situational awareness. The cabin, understated as it is in color and trim, is decently outfitted save some hard plastic on the transmission tunnel. Real aluminum trim rims the door and instrument panel. But more crucial to muscle car fanatics is performance and personality, and the SS has surprisingly capable dynamics for a big bore, front-engine car. There's a lovely bass note from the V8, though four customizable settings can vary the sound output, hushing it considerably in so-called Stealth mode. The engine delivers a ton of torquey gravitas, while the 10-speed auto …
Full Review
MALIBU, Calif. — The updated 2019 Camaro SS might be the third-best-selling muscle car, behind the Dodge Challenger and the Ford Mustang, but it makes a mighty bid for relevance. That's due in large part to the enthusiasm of guys like Mr. Camaro himself — Chevrolet chief engineer Al Oppenheiser, sitting with me at breakfast ahead of my first drive of the new 2019 Chevy Camaro SS 10-speed. "Here are a few pics of my garage," he gushed, sharing cellphone snaps of his multi-generational stash of Camaros, which include the crown jewel, a lovingly restored and gorgeous 1968 SS convertible. So he knows muscle. And the 2019 SS ($37,000) is a large-displacement monster stalking the land that turbochargers forgot. We're talking 6.2 liters of growly, burbly, naturally aspirated V8 power producing a stout 455 hp and 455 lb-ft. And yes, you can pair the mighty mill with a good old-fashioned manual transmission. The facelifted iteration of the sixth-generation Camaro that debuted in 2016 adds an available 10-speed automatic gearbox, revised front and rear ends with new LED taillamps, updated 20-inch wheels and a new third-gen infotainment system. But before you go bashing the two-pedal setup, spoiler alert: This is no uninspired slushbox. It's actually really good. The multi-clutch 10-speed was co-developed initially with Ford (go figure), and claims shifts in as little as 150 milliseconds — faster than Porsche's PDK dual-clutch. Interestingly, Oppenheiser says he was so impressed with Porsche's predictive tachometer, which blips down to meet the projected rpm in the next gear, that the feature was incorporated into Camaro. For what it's worth, the Camaro's new mask-like face has gleaned more than its share of controversy. However, haters should note that the so-called Flowtie — introduced on the 2014 Camaro Z/28 — serves a functional purpose by channeling up to 3 cubic meters of air per minute through the front end. Nifty. The Camaro SS's cabin is immersive — and not necessarily in a good way. Shut those big heavy doors, and the high sills makes you feel like you're sitting deep within the vehicle, with large haunches and C-pillars obscuring quite a bit of rear visibility. New for '19 is an available digital rearview mirror that goes a long way towards remedying those notorious blindspots. Even in the convertible version, which has a relatively small rear window opening with the top up, flipping the mirrors to digital mode provides a much-needed boost in confidence and situational awareness. The cabin, understated as it is in color and trim, is decently outfitted save some hard plastic on the transmission tunnel. Real aluminum trim rims the door and instrument panel. But more crucial to muscle car fanatics is performance and personality, and the SS has surprisingly capable dynamics for a big bore, front-engine car. There's a lovely bass note from the V8, though four customizable settings can vary the sound output, hushing it considerably in so-called Stealth mode. The engine delivers a ton of torquey gravitas, while the 10-speed auto …
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Retail Price

$37,000 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

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Engine 3.6LV-6
MPG 16 City / 27 Hwy
Seating 4 Passengers
Transmission 6-spd man w/OD
Power 335 @ 6800 rpm
Drivetrain rear-wheel
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